therapy

Focused on the relationship between doctor and patient. Therapy is the process of self-discovery.

  • Airika Lewis
    Published about a year ago
    Labels

    Labels

    Usually, when people give someone or something a label, they are trying to describe the person or object. One might label to help define what is going on around them. One might be trying to make sense of what’s occurring. It is human nature to label things and people, and it can occur without the person acknowledging that they are doing so. In the book Drunk Tank Pink, written by Adam Alter, he delves into the definition of labels, stating, “In the 1930s, Benjamin Whorf argued that words shape how we see objects, people, and places (29)”. Many people do not realize that while they are quickly assessing what is in front of them, they could be judging or assigning a negative label. Labels are powerful, in a sense that they could begin to affect how the person or object is perceived. Alter also states, “Labels are harmful to the extent that they become associated with meaningful character traits (34)”. Common labels can potentially turn into stereotypes, which is unfortunately unavoidable. If one would educate themselves before making an assumption, labels and stereotypes can become more positive and accurate.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 21)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 21)

    A couple years ago I started to see references to the term "narrative therapy" as a therapeutic toolset. At the time I was between therapists, but while art therapy, cognitive behavioral theory, and more traditional psychotherapy had all felt artificial and problematic, I instantly grasped and appreciated narrative therapy.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 20)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 20)

    So. It is happening. I will soon have health insurance. And with that health insurance, comes the potential for reduced therapist rates! Now, I'm locked into the crappy provider list of the insurance company, which is a little bleak looking, but there are options—which is more than I could say before.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 19)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 19)

    So, as some background here: I have an uncle who suffers from schizophrenia. His illness is well-treated, and he lives well enough, though he isn't able to live independently. My mother once told me that his provider was concerned that his schizophrenia was actually a particularly severe psychotic depression combined with a low IQ. After all, though he is paranoid about the government, he never really felt that he was receiving secret messages. Instead, his fixation was on how awful things are. On how garbage the government is, on how much they don't care about the wellbeing of people. On how awful life often is.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 18)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 18)

    So, I am close, so close, to seeing a doctor.
  • Gulce Sakallioglu
    Published about a year ago
    The Basics of Therapy

    The Basics of Therapy

    At one point or another, we are all likely to face difficulties in our lives that are seemingly too complicated to overcome by ourselves. This might be an isolated incident that we encounter, such as losing a job, which perhaps triggered a set of overwhelming emotions like self-doubt and shame that engulfs us. Or it might be a general sense of sadness and loss of motivation that seems to linger, no matter what we do, which makes it difficult to get out of bed each morning. When such a situation arises, seeking help from a therapist could be a great option; to not only solve present problems, but to also foster a deeper understanding of ourselves and our minds, which will enable us to be more competent in dealing with similar problems in the future.
  • Tobias Gillot
    Published about a year ago
    How Therapy Helps Set Boundaries

    How Therapy Helps Set Boundaries

    Sometimes, a relationship ends without any clear reason. But more often than not, there are early warning signs. It’s common to ignore those signs when you’ve just gotten together with someone and think everything about them is charming. But once things get serious, then you’ll have to either deal with those issues or decide to break up.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 16)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 16)

    In many carer industries, they use the term "Compassion Fatigue." This generally refers to the trauma, exhaustion, and stress that results from overextending yourself in the care of others. It's a common issue in the fields of counseling and hospice, as people lose themselves in the fight to ease the suffering of others.
  • Claire Peters
    Published about a year ago
    Getting Better Together: The Benefits of Group Therapy

    Getting Better Together: The Benefits of Group Therapy

    Mental health issues are not new, but many of the ways that we think about, and deal with them, are. Society has changed quite a bit, and the ever-learning mind has a lot to process, in this ever-expanding world. Traumatic experiences, depression, and intense anger complicate the process of life, exponentially.
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 15)

    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 15)

    So, as I may have mentioned previously, I have only been medicating with basically a little THC and some lifestyle maintenance things.
  • Azaria Brown
    Published about a year ago
    I Can't Afford Therapy

    I Can't Afford Therapy

    There are a few pretty widespread affordable therapy options out there: Talk Space, Open Path, Better Help, etc. But, if your pockets look anything like mine, you still can’t afford them. While paying $30 to $70 a week is an enormous decrease in price, it can still cost up to $300 a month, which is just an extra bill that many can’t afford. In some cases, healthcare will cover therapy and mental health services, but I know that I can’t afford healthcare and I’m sure many others can’t either. So, what do you do when you can’t afford therapy, but you don’t want your mental health to climb aboard a sinking ship?
  • Haybitch Abersnatchy
    Published about a year ago
    Who Needs a Therapist When (Pt. 14)