aging

Aging with grace and beauty. Embrace age with aging advice, tips, and tricks.

  • Emilly Parris
    Published 4 days ago
    How to Care For Your Elderly Relatives During COVID-19

    How to Care For Your Elderly Relatives During COVID-19

    If you’re caring for an elderly relative or you live in a multigenerational household, you may have concerns about how COVID-19 will affect them, both directly and indirectly. Evidence suggests that older people are more likely to experience serious and life-threatening complications from the virus.
  • Cheryl E Preston
    Published 7 days ago
    Reasons Older Adults Continue Their Education

    Reasons Older Adults Continue Their Education

    Narrow minded people often make false assumptions regarding situations where they are not aware of the details. People tend to put their own spin on why others make the decisions they do, and usually they are wrong. This is very true when it comes to adults over age 50, who are not sitting in a rocking chair waiting to die. One area in question is why senior citizens decide to go back to school. The small mind, associates college education with youth and trying to obtain a good paying job. While that is one aspect of higher learning, there is so much more to why older men and women decide to continue their education. Please consider the following.
  • Scotty Roberts
    Published 8 days ago
    Ode to a Sunday Morning...

    Ode to a Sunday Morning...

    Y’know – and here’s some phenomenal profundidty – I am not as young as I used to be.
  • Marshall Stevenson
    Published about a month ago
    Healthy Aging for Men

    Healthy Aging for Men

    As you age, chances are your health is a top concern. But aging doesn’t necessarily mean that your health needs to decline. There are precautions you can take to ensure your physical and mental health prosper as you age. Some habits, like exercising and regularly visiting your doctor, may seem like common sense—but other important steps might not come to mind. When utilized together, these tips will help support a man’s healthy aging process.
  • Ashley Bell
    Published about a month ago
    Let's stop spreading the myth that getting older is such a rewarding experience that is symbolic of wisdom.

    Let's stop spreading the myth that getting older is such a rewarding experience that is symbolic of wisdom.

    Events that represent the passage of time, such as the celebration of birthdays; the emergence of a new season like summer, spring or winter; New Years' Eve celebrations and wedding anniversaries, traditionally invoke meaningful memories for most of us - but for the elderly - especially those living in aged care facilities and those who live with the effects of dementia - being reminded of ageing can be a depressing experience, triggering symptoms of anxiety and grief.
  • Krisna Garcia
    Published about a month ago
    Why Is CoQ10 So Important?

    Why Is CoQ10 So Important?

    What is CoQ10, and what does it do? CoQ10 is a form of coenzyme and natural antioxidant found in every cell in our bodies. Coenzymes can aid enzymes with several different bodily processes, from food digestion to muscle repair and more. Antioxidants protect the cells in your body from damage caused by harmful molecules. Specifically, CoQ10 plays a serious role in cell energy production and helps oxygen get where it has to move into your system. All the things that go into decline as we age, CoQ10 helps to repair and rejuvenate. If this sparks your interest then read ahead for all the data within the following article titled Why is CoQ10 so important?
  • Frank Racioppi
    Published about a month ago
    The connection between Hearing Loss and the Brain

    The connection between Hearing Loss and the Brain

    Senior citizens are often afflicted by loss of hearing and a new study concluded it's the brain, not the ears that may be the cause of the hearing difficulties.
  • Inthu Parameswaran
    Published about a month ago
    You're so old Grandpa..

    You're so old Grandpa..

    I'm getting the impression that my parents, who are aging as we all are, have convinced themselves that they are "too old" to pretty much continue living. On top of this impression which I should really state is an epiphany, their loved ones and the public also convince my naturally aging parents that they are in fact "too old." CONVINCE was a very thought out word on my part for this whole paragraph and introduction.
  • Stephanie Murguia
    Published about a month ago
    Could Nursing Home Abuse Spike During COVID-19?

    Could Nursing Home Abuse Spike During COVID-19?

    Nursing home abuse is a growing problem in the United States and during a pandemic where contact with elders has become limited, we could see a spike in elder abuse across the country. According to U.S. statistics, at least 5 million elders are abused each year, most cases involving physical abuse. At the beginning of the spread of COVID-19 older people were considered the most vulnerable type of person to contract the virus, therefore, the first steps were to stay far from people who were older than 64. This meant family members couldn't visit them if they lived in an assisted living community.
  • Isabelle Emma
    Published 2 months ago
    First Place in Love More Challenge
    Generation Bloomer

    Generation Bloomer

    Why is a 22-year-old writing about the importance of positive ageing representation in social media, you may ask?
  • Britt Alexandria
    Published 2 months ago
    Portrait of a Memory Part 3

    Portrait of a Memory Part 3

    When Jane walked through her front door, she dropped her bag and slumped into the couch. Her eyes stung from the tearful episode in her car.
  • Britt Alexandria
    Published 2 months ago
    Portrait of a Memory Part 2

    Portrait of a Memory Part 2

    Jane pulled a purple composition notebook and purple pencil from her messenger bag. She didn’t particularly like the color purple. In fact, she had a love/hate relationship with that color. After her grandmother’s Alzheimer diagnosis, Jane went off the deep end of advocacy. She joined support groups, wrote and signed petitions to spread awareness, and ran fundraisers to raise money for research. Purple is the “official color” of Alzheimer’s disease, so naturally she collected everything in purple. She worked tirelessly as if her actions would somehow change her grandmother’s prognosis. When it didn’t work that way, Jane was stuck with a lot of purple junk.