Iria Vasquez-Paez

Iria Vasquez-Paez

I have a B.A. in creative writing from San Francisco State. Can people please donate? I'm very low-income. I need to start an escape the Ferengi plan. 

How does it work?
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 3 months ago
    The New Congress

    The New Congress

    The 116th Congress is run by 67 Democrats and 44 Republicans, to which I say, good. For once, Congress has some diversity. Yes, there is the occasional black representative, but see, my own people, Hispanics, have historically been underrepresented. The New York Times is a publication I got my free subscription to because my dabbling in real journalism is going nowhere without access to information like the type found in The New York Times. Okay, we have 101 fresh Representatives in the House, mostly white, although there are some people of color.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 3 months ago
    What We the People Could Do About the Constitution

    What We the People Could Do About the Constitution

    We’ve seen Amendments to the Constitution but I’m going to go out on a limb and say we need to rewrite it for modern times stating that men and women get equal work for equal pay, that we are all equal no matter where we come from, and that birthright citizenship will always exist. We need to define what America means to us. We can’t let somebody else do it, we have to have everybody’s input, which is why the Internet exists. We don’t have to do this with a drop of blood spilled either.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 4 months ago
    Why I Want to Run for President

    Why I Want to Run for President

    First of all, I’m shy. I’m dreadfully shy. So nobody break down my email box with emails, please. I want to run for Governor of California and serve as the Senator of Los Angeles when I move to Sacramento, after getting my Ph.D. along with everything else, which is on my blog or Facebook page, and then I become a congressional representative in Washington, D.C. After that, the door is wide open to run for president. The old Man used to say that being president is a man’s job, and how dare I even think it?
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 4 months ago
    The House of Representatives

    The House of Representatives

    The House makes up half of Congress as the government’s legislative branch. The House has 325 voting members, their positions are based on the population of the 50 states. A representative is referred to as a congressman or congresswoman. The number of voters for the House was set at 435 on August 8, 1911, in effect since 1913. The number of representatives per state is proportionate to the population. Article one, Section two of the Constitution has provided for the minimum and maximum sizes for the House of Representatives, as there are five delegates representing the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 4 months ago
    The Way Congress Works

    The Way Congress Works

    Congress is the legislative body of the United States government. Our lawmakers make decisions that affect us on a federal level, and federal generally refers to the entire country. Individual state law is different from multi-national law that affects the entire country. Each state in the Union is represented by two law makers from the state. There are two chambers that make up Congress, the House of Representatives, and the Senate. Congress has 535 voting members, and 100 Senators. There are six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, The Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the District of Columbia.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 4 months ago
    United States Congress

    United States Congress

    There are three branches of government, judicial, legislative, and executive. The President leads the executive branch, while the judicial branch's highest office is the Supreme Court of the United States. Congress has the power to make laws, as the legislative branch of the United States system of governance. Congress is the only branch of the government elected by the people. The people have given Congress the power to make the laws, to declare war, and to raise public money, as well as to impeach and try federal officers. Congress approves or impeaches the President, and has the power to approve treaties negotiated by the executive branch, as well as help out with oversight and major investigations.