Iria Vasquez-Paez

Iria Vasquez-Paez

I have a B.A. in creative writing from San Francisco State. Can people please donate? I'm very low-income. I need to start an escape the Ferengi plan. 

How does it work?
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 5 months ago
    The California State Legislature

    The California State Legislature

    The California State Legislature is made up of the California State Assembly and 80 members. The California State Senate has 40 members, with both houses of the legislature convening at the California State Capitol in Sacramento. I want to serve the California State Legislature as a member someday because it is one of ten full-time state legislatures in the United States. The State assembly consists of 61 Democrats, and 18 Republicans with one vacancy, while the Senate is composed of 29 Democrats, and 11 Republicans. There was a brief period between 1995 and 1996 where Republicans ran the show, the Democrats have run the California Assembly since the 1970 election.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 5 months ago
    The 27th Amendment

    The 27th Amendment

    Gregory Watson was an undergrad at the University of Texas, Austin, who rediscovered a forgotten amendment, the 27th Amendment to be accurate. This Amendment had come about on September 25, 1789, including eleven other proposed amendments. The first Congress had wanted to address the issue of salaries for Congress. In 1982, Watson had dredged up this amendment by writing a paper about it. This amendment had not been fully ratified in the 18th century, as it had become constitutional on May 5, 1992, because this was a ratification period of 202 years, 7 months and 10 days when this amendment was finally ratified.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 5 months ago
    The 26th Amendment

    The 26th Amendment

    I got to vote at 18, I remember that I took this very seriously. I couldn’t drive yet because of my family, but I decided to vote. I felt powerful, and I think I voted for Clinton that year again, despite all of his crazy scandals. The 26th Amendment is all about the right of 18 year olds to vote in any election. The United States is bound to not be able to deny the right to vote. The 26th Amendment is the last of its kind in a series of amendments enacted in more than one century. This amendment is designed as protection for voting rights.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 5 months ago
    The 25th Amendment

    The 25th Amendment

    The 25th Amendment delves into what is to be done if a sitting President dies while in office. The Amendment takes into account what happens to a President if necessary, whether found in the circumstances of death, removal, resignation, or incapacitation. The removal of a President or Vice President from office requires the application of these procedures. The 25th Amendment was already organized in the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, an act that shocked the free world, leaving huge emotional scars for those who were around during this time.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 5 months ago
    The 24th Amendment

    The 24th Amendment

    The 24th Amendment is what stops Congress and any state from allowing the right to vote to be predicated on a payment poll of taxes, or any kind of tax for that matter. Voting is supposed to be free. Congress wrote the 24th Amendment, and it was proposed to the States on August 27, 1962. It was then passed on January 23, 1964. The Southern states who used to be a part of the Confederacy, had adopted poll taxes in the late 19th Century, because they wanted to make sure that former slaves did not vote much if at all.
  • Iria Vasquez-Paez
    Published 6 months ago
    The 23rd Amendment

    The 23rd Amendment

    The 23rd Amendment to the Constitution was passed on June 16th, 1960 and had to do with electors, as well as the right to the people living in the District of Columbia the right to vote in Presidential elections. The 23rd Amendment was ratified on March 29th, 1961. This Amendment refers to the fact that the Constitution provides each state with presidential electors that are equal to the number of seats that are put together in the Senate and House of Representatives, since the District of Columbia is not a State, which means it didn’t have electors prior to the adoption of the 23rd Amendment.