Latest in Serve
  • Darrius Dickerson
    Published 2 days ago
    Random tidbits from my stint as an American sniper

    Random tidbits from my stint as an American sniper

    Diving in headfirst: 1.) Don't ever forget that a sniper's most valuable weapon is his/her ability to remain undetected. Leaving equipment and waste all willy nilly is a big no-no. "Periodt".
  • Mike Torrez
    Published 3 days ago
    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan

    22 months in Afghanistan is always thought of as “hell on earth” to everyone. I’m not downgrading anyone, I’m just saying there’s different things that make deployments easier than others. My friends may have different memories, but this is just my story, from my eyes...
  • Lawrence Edward Hinchee
    Published 3 days ago
    Memories Of Germany

    Memories Of Germany

    As I stepped off the charter flight that cold day in April 1979, I knew not what to expect. Here I was for the first time in a country that wasn't my own. We had a sergeant meet us at the airport and then the police dogs came through to sniff our bags for drugs and contraband. I was just eighteen and never been more than five hundred miles from Roanoke, VA for any extended amount of time now here I was more than three thousand miles from home. I was like thousands of others before me fear of the unknown.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 3 days ago
    Marine Corps Stories: 4GAT321

    Marine Corps Stories: 4GAT321

    “Coriolanus is underappreciated,” Dylan McCole said. “How could you say that?” Merrin Vault retorted. “It’s clearly one of his worst. There’s hardly a soliloquy to speak of to address the inner turmoil of the character.”
  • Hannah Dalpe
    Published 5 days ago
    Anatomy of a Sailor

    Anatomy of a Sailor

    So you want to know what a Sailor is made of, huh? A Sailor is a simple thing made up of salt, alcohol, and disgruntlement. The salt is coarse-cut with jagged, sharp edges like broken glass that rip up the soul to shreds with every voyage. It stings at every open wound and infects the mind and body with poisonous introspection. The lacerations made by every barbed granule don't heal but instead become one hulking, pulsating gash that swallows everything whole.
  • Luc Levesque
    Published 7 days ago
    MISSION

    MISSION

    The Colours of the fall are so beautiful, but November has me feeling heavy and sad for the fallen and those who are still falling. I am also falling... but if I fall, those who love me will suffer and life for them will never ever have the same colours and they almost surely may also fall... Therefore, I still have a purpose here and I do want to stay alive, but why is death always so close to me and always looming over me?
Staff Picks
  • Alan Russell
    Published about a month ago
    Travels of a War Bride

    Travels of a War Bride

    INTRODUCTION There were approximately 48,000 British women who fell in love with and married service men from around the world during and after World War II. All of them have their own deeply personal stories. Some were both happy and some tragic. None of those 48,000 stories could have been more deeply personal than the story of my own parents which, fortunately in my case, turned out very happy.
  • Sharon Wilfong
    Published 5 months ago
    First Place in Confession Corner Challenge
    I Dropped Out of Marine Bootcamp

    I Dropped Out of Marine Bootcamp

    I have a confession to make. I joined the Marines and went into Bootcamp right after high school. If that surprises you, then what do you think when I tell you that I dropped out?
  • Faye Wilde
    Published 7 months ago
    Truth

    Truth

    The sounds of summer are coalescing around me. They have always felt the same to me. Hot and oppressive, full of shouting and sorrow, fear.
  • Peter Ellis
    Published 11 months ago
    1917: The Frontline Review

    1917: The Frontline Review

    World War One is a period of time that doesn't receive a lot of attention in the movie industry. Maybe it is because the powers that be got involved for less-than-noble reasons, so it wouldn't seem right to try and make a film on the matter. But for the hundreds of thousands of everyman soldiers that thought and died in battle, this was just them following orders, even if they didn't always agree with them.
  • Chantell Fourie
    Published about a year ago
    They Will Not Be Home for Supper

    They Will Not Be Home for Supper

    My torn coat flaps in the vicious breeze as I walk slowly back home, my four year old brother running and skipping ahead, oblivious to our suffering. Pain shoots through my empty belly as I jolt and shake with each jagged step. My skin feels burnt, despite the cold, as I stride to what I humbly call my home. Disappointment reddens my face every time I walk the broken garden path to my front door. The door is dull and weathered, the lock all but broken. My sunken eyes blur as I notice the torn curtains and empty closets. I check for letters then hurry inside to start dinner for my little brother. My father is in the army. He will not be back for supper. I pour water into an iron pot and open the pantry door. I stare at the same thing I stare at every day. Nothing. I stifle a sob, not wanting the carefree nature of my brother to be corrupted by my hopelessness. My mother is dead. She was shot protecting the daughter of two complete strangers. The fruits of a country too long at war. She will not be home for supper.
  • Dave Smith
    Published about a year ago
    D-Day Siblings Reunited 75 Years Later

    D-Day Siblings Reunited 75 Years Later

    On 6th June, 1944, allied forces undertook what became the biggest seaborne invasion in history. In what was known at the time as "Operation Neptune," 160,000 American, British, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and other allied soldiers stormed a 50 mile stretch of heavily-fortified coastline in Normandy, in Nazi-occupied France, landing in amphibious craft and immediately coming under heavy fire. The operation has been re-imagined in countless movies, TV shows and video games—perhaps most famously in Steven Spielberg's 1998 film Saving Private Ryan.
Featured Collections
Airforce
  • Len Davies
    Published 11 days ago
    RAF Days Part 7

    RAF Days Part 7

    As 1973 began major changes in my life were about to take place anad these would see me return to Civvy street. More memories from my biography "Do or no Not"!
  • Len Davies
    Published 14 days ago
    RAF Days Pt 6

    RAF Days Pt 6

    More escapades from my RAF days as recounbted in my biography "Do or do not". In the sticky hot summer of 1972 I had a very close call one day when an emergency exercise was called. Every Nimrod had to be airborne as soon as possible and my assigned place was with one of the engine Sergeants who would start the engines on the aircraft, then go to start another as I waited for the crew to arrive from the mess on the main camp at which point I would put on my ear defenders, pick up the marshalling bats and guide the aircraft from the pad to the taxiway. Mine was the last aircraft in the row and as I waved it on I would normally have left my ear defenders on until they were clear, but it was so hot and sticky that I took them off early only to hear the sergeant shouting “Davies Hit The Deck”, so training kicking in I dived for the ground as the aircraft I had just marshalled opened up its throttles full sending waves of heat over me. Had I been standing I would probably have been blown head over heels, but I survived with only a few scratches. On debrief the pilot claimed that he felt a vibration and wanted to test the engines, but was disciplined as he should only do that at the end of the runway so I was informed. On a positive side the aircraft were all up in 11 minutes, and the sight of 11 Nimrods taking off one after the other was unforgettable.
  • Len Davies
    Published 16 days ago
    RAF Days Part 5

    RAF Days Part 5

    More teenage memories of my days in the RAF from my biography 'Do or Do Not'. 1971 only had 8 weeks to go as I settled in and I was to experience my first Christmas away from home, which really hurt, but I must admit the mess did a good job on Christmas dinner, which must have been bittersweet for them as they no doubt wanted to be home too. As 1972 came in I discovered the RAF St. Mawgan radio station that was piped into every billet and selectable on a speaker above the door in every room. I didn’t have much of a private life so I decided to check it out and was doing regular radio shows pretty soon. The station controller was a guy called Keith Oliver who had a strong love of American radio stations and used to get as many radio jingles as he could from them. I had a ball as musically there was so much good stuff coming out and we used to get a lot of the latest music provided into the radio library. My musical tastes have always been a huge mixture from Classical through Soul through pop to hard rock, and this year saw some of the best music around. Argent, The Sweet, The Detroit Spinners, Carole King, The Strawbs, T Rex, Electric Light Orchestra, The O’Jays, The Osmonds, The Jackson Five, Alice Cooper, the list just goes on, and even to this day the music of the time brings back totally sharp memories of every event. I can still see the layout of the radio station with its antequated turntables and slipmats, old fashioned mixer and typical RAF Microphone and headphones, but I loved it. I even opted to do the breakfast show one day at 6am, and thought “If they wanted to be woken up this should do it” and promptly opened with ‘Schools Out’ by Alice Cooper. People left the radio switched on if they wanted it to be used as an alarm so I guess a few people got a rude awakening that day.
Army
  • Mike Torrez
    Published 3 days ago
    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan

    22 months in Afghanistan is always thought of as “hell on earth” to everyone. I’m not downgrading anyone, I’m just saying there’s different things that make deployments easier than others. My friends may have different memories, but this is just my story, from my eyes...
  • Lawrence Edward Hinchee
    Published 3 days ago
    Memories Of Germany

    Memories Of Germany

    As I stepped off the charter flight that cold day in April 1979, I knew not what to expect. Here I was for the first time in a country that wasn't my own. We had a sergeant meet us at the airport and then the police dogs came through to sniff our bags for drugs and contraband. I was just eighteen and never been more than five hundred miles from Roanoke, VA for any extended amount of time now here I was more than three thousand miles from home. I was like thousands of others before me fear of the unknown.
  • Johnathon Mackin
    Published 7 days ago
    ARAB AND ISRAELI MILITARIES

    ARAB AND ISRAELI MILITARIES

    As someone who has directly trained with IDF and Arab militaries. On the most basic level of training the IDF will outstrip any Arab military. For example, on the individual zeroing weapons was a trial. These Arabs did not believe it was useful and neither did the commanders. Some of the Arab country soldiers thought that basic geometry was like magic. Yes, one millimeter movement of your sight is really one meter at one thousand meters. It works. Does anyone believe I had to make any IDF soldier believe that? This is just an example and indicative of the problems I would encounter in Arab countries on the individual level. Yes, your Arab soldiers need water and food. Believe it or not I had to tell Arab commanders these things. I believe it was systemic because almost everyone I encountered had this attitude. At the company and battalion level the leadership was just lacking. Follow through with even any basic job just was not there. When conducting combat operations, planning was unrealistic, not timely, or just plain bad. We normally just utilized my plan. A lot of the Arab soldiers’ leadership did not and would not lead their soldiers in combat during major operations. They would either want to utilize the radio from base or take annual leave. I wrote this part in another post but it is relevant. When we were setting up basic combat training for the Jundi in Habbiniya, the Iraqi Army had virtually a blank check to train the Jundi how they wanted. Unlimited funds really. I said, “You can train them like the United States Marine Corps, Army, French Foreign Legion, Royal Marines,” I showed them videos of entire boot camps and basic training, the follow-on training they received. “Nope, we’re going to train in the dirt and not utilize any technology or experience from modern militaries. Because that training worked against the Americans.”
Career
  • Jenson John
    Published 12 days ago
    PassUp-Letgo Clone

    PassUp-Letgo Clone

    https://www.trioangle.com/letgo-clone/
  • Veteran / LEO Served
    Published about a month ago
    My Introduction To My Life (Joining The United States ARMY)

    My Introduction To My Life (Joining The United States ARMY)

    Article #1 In this article (My Introduction), I will be writing about my life experiences while serving in the Military (4 Years) and Law Enforcement (10 Years And Counting...). The goal is to be able to help other people who are interested in serving in the Military or Law Enforcement. This is will be a compilation of articles which I will continue to write and publish here on Vocal Media. The point is for you to continue to come back and read more articles about my life experiences and anything that will be able to help you transition into your career, even readers who are already serving, or you as a reader and are just interested in the military/law enforcement life. I will talk about my life in the military first and eventually into my life into law enforcement.
  • Dana Catoe
    Published 2 months ago
    Memoirs from Iraq

    Memoirs from Iraq

    Rob called me into the office area of the suite. "Alright brother what's the gig? What will I be doing when I get to Iraq"? I ask.
Family
  • Lee-Anne Ford
    Published 20 days ago
    The soldier's heart

    The soldier's heart

    My adopted father served in the 29th Brigade, 47th Battalion, Australian Commonwealth Military Forces, in World War II, and never spoke much about his six years in the army. Since his passing, I have done much research at the Australian War Memorial, to get a better understanding of his history and his service. There is a memorial plaque, at the AWM, for the 29th Brigade, and I wept when I saw it. My adopted father had actually told me quite a lot about his war; I didn't realise it until I saw that memorial plaque, and the Brigade motto:
  • Marlena Hallett
    Published about a month ago
    Once a Military Wife, Always a Military Wife

    Once a Military Wife, Always a Military Wife

    I spent many years married to the military thru my husband at the time .I have held many jobs in one form or the other ..some I was paid for,, other's were volunteering for the unit my husband served in.
  • Kyri Martinez
    Published about a month ago
    Deployment VS Wife: Part 2

    Deployment VS Wife: Part 2

    You Chose This Life Correct me if I am wrong, but all military wives hate when people say, "You chose this life. You knew this was going to happen." A person saying that does not automatically make everything difficult about deployment disappear. Some of us wish that it would, but unfortunately that is not how it works.
Gear
  • charlie btallent
    Published 2 years ago
    The Top Four Fearsome Blades Used By Special Forces

    The Top Four Fearsome Blades Used By Special Forces

    Many people have a sort of love/hate relationship with all kinds of weapons in general. They do find them fascinating to look at from a distance, but to get them to touch or wield a sword or gun would be too much of a stretch. Additionally, a lot of us have this internal fear within ourselves that we may very well end up hurting ourselves, because we have no idea how to handle them. Given how many times that has happened to people, this fear is perfectly valid.
  • Buddy Brown
    Published 2 years ago
    10 Gifts That Help Support Veteran Organizations

    10 Gifts That Help Support Veteran Organizations

    Anyone who has been watching the national budget getting passed can tell you that veteran care is grossly underfunded. For all the work veterans do, Uncle Sam simply doesn't want to take care of them once they are out of the service.
  • Jesse Kinney
    Published 3 years ago
    10 Tactical Folding Knives for Survival & Self-Defense

    10 Tactical Folding Knives for Survival & Self-Defense

    Whatever your situation is, whether you want to join the military, you're an active member of the military, or just in the market for survival gear, you'll want to look into the best possible equipment you get. Tactical folding knives are some of the popular pieces of tactical defense equipment and can be extremely important.
History
How To
List
  • Darrius Dickerson
    Published 2 days ago
    Random tidbits from my stint as an American sniper

    Random tidbits from my stint as an American sniper

    Diving in headfirst: 1.) Don't ever forget that a sniper's most valuable weapon is his/her ability to remain undetected. Leaving equipment and waste all willy nilly is a big no-no. "Periodt".
  • Jenson John
    Published 12 days ago
    PassUp-Letgo Clone

    PassUp-Letgo Clone

    https://www.trioangle.com/letgo-clone/
  • Veteran / LEO Served
    Published 30 days ago
    To Do List Before Leaving For US Army Boot Camp / Basic Training

    To Do List Before Leaving For US Army Boot Camp / Basic Training

    Article #3 In this article, I will compile a list of things that should be done before leaving for basic training. I will add things to the list that should benefit both a young 18 year old person straight out of high school to someone who is in their late 20's that's married and has children. The list will either help you out or it doesn't. I know each person is different in their seasons of life but I know a lot of people joined the military straight out of high school as enlisted. That is to all the branch of the military not just the United States Army.
Marine Corps
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 3 days ago
    Marine Corps Stories: 4GAT321

    Marine Corps Stories: 4GAT321

    “Coriolanus is underappreciated,” Dylan McCole said. “How could you say that?” Merrin Vault retorted. “It’s clearly one of his worst. There’s hardly a soliloquy to speak of to address the inner turmoil of the character.”
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 9 days ago
    Marine Corps Stories: The Drone Plan

    Marine Corps Stories: The Drone Plan

    The spinning blades of the drone whirred with intensity. The cerulean brilliance of the morning sky was only enhanced by the presence of some small, pure-whte cumulus clouds. Each of the blades reflected the sunlight as the device raised up from the ground. Anyone looking up at the Yuma Marine Corps Air Base in Arizona couldn’t help but see the drone.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 10 days ago
    Marine Corps Stories: They Know

    Marine Corps Stories: They Know

    Colonel McCarthy Beal sat down as the scant amount of onlookers seated themselves as well. “First Lieutenant Claire Howard, I understand you have been in the brig for six and a half months. Is that right?”
Movie Review
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 12 days ago
    All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

    All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about a month ago
    Apocalypse Now (1979)

    Apocalypse Now (1979)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • MovieBabble
    Published 3 months ago
    ‘Beau Travail’: Hard Work Has Never Looked So Good

    ‘Beau Travail’: Hard Work Has Never Looked So Good

    Beau Travail is the 1999 cult classic from renowned director, Claire Denis. It tells the story of Galoup, an ex-Foreign Legion officer who recalls his time leading troops in the country of Djibouti; and thanks to the folks over at Janus Films, the world is finally receiving a brand new 4K digital restoration, supervised by director of photography Agnès Godard and approved by director Claire Denis. From an outsider’s perspective, this seems like something that has been a long time coming and I cannot think of a better way to watch this film for the first time.
  • Hannah Dalpe
    Published 5 days ago
    Anatomy of a Sailor

    Anatomy of a Sailor

    So you want to know what a Sailor is made of, huh? A Sailor is a simple thing made up of salt, alcohol, and disgruntlement. The salt is coarse-cut with jagged, sharp edges like broken glass that rip up the soul to shreds with every voyage. It stings at every open wound and infects the mind and body with poisonous introspection. The lacerations made by every barbed granule don't heal but instead become one hulking, pulsating gash that swallows everything whole.
  • Cooking With Casto
    Published 2 months ago
    Please US NAVY forgive me

    Please US NAVY forgive me

    The journey began in 2010. After making it out of separations, I was back into boot camp. One Captains mast down, but more to come. I guess an assault on civilian swimmer isn’t tolerated these days in boot camp. I was ordered to take an anger management course, that’s where, according to Sr. Chief Rodriguez I found out that I might have a big penis, I probably liked to stare at my naked body in the mirror, and I may have been molested as a child. This guy was crazy. He would touch me on the thigh; it was funny to see his reaction. When I would agree to everything he was saying. Like one question was “do you like looking at your naked body in the mirror, I bet your penis is big too? Do you play with it in front of the mirror? What kind of sick questions is this amigo laying on me? I think (hope) they were trying to make me be aggressive, or at least I hoped, with these tactics. Well after all that for a week, I finally passed and was sent to a new division. Wow, that was a close one I thought to myself.
  • Shentel Downes
    Published 3 months ago
    On Remembering

    On Remembering

    I have a lot of thoughts about yesterday- the anniversary of 9/11- and about how that day shaped my life. I was eleven years old, walking between classes in middle school, feeling that something was off, on my way to math class. The TV was on when I got there, which was completely out of the ordinary. None of us in the class knew where the Twin Towers were, so our teacher, Mr. Myers, showed us on the map. People were falling or jumping from the towers on TV as we watched. I cried. I was afraid. On the way home from school on the bus, the armory parking lot next to the Weis grocery store was dotted with military vehicles like something out of a movie. When I got home, mom cried in front of the TV, and we all held each other. I kept a journal of the details from the news, because I didn't know what else to do. There were no planes in the sky that week, and I remember Dad saying I'd never see that happen again- he was right.
Veteran
  • Luc Levesque
    Published 7 days ago
    MISSION

    MISSION

    The Colours of the fall are so beautiful, but November has me feeling heavy and sad for the fallen and those who are still falling. I am also falling... but if I fall, those who love me will suffer and life for them will never ever have the same colours and they almost surely may also fall... Therefore, I still have a purpose here and I do want to stay alive, but why is death always so close to me and always looming over me?
  • Olivia Crowe
    Published 12 days ago
    A Fallen Soldier

    A Fallen Soldier

    A Fallen Soldier Olivia Crowe She jolted upright in a cold sweat. On high alert from the gruesome flashbacks, all she could hear was rapid machine guns and screams. Her nose was assaulted with a memory of gunpowder and iron seemed to be filling the air. She looked around frantically and after a moment she realized she wasn't on the battlefield. It had been three weeks since she was given her honorable discharge. After five years of service it seemed like her life was back to the beginning. Five years she had known everything she needed to do with her life. Where to be and when. Now she was lost. Her life seemed over. She wasn’t able to start her intern year for residency until the therapist her corporal assigned had her cleared for practice. So here she was. Twenty-three and trapped in the house her mother left her. No family in Seattle anymore and no friends since she grew up in Atlanta. Looking at the clock she sighed. Three in the morning and with no hope to fall asleep again she rolls out of her bed. Into the kitchen to start coffee she gently pats her dog. A two year old retired military dog named Atlas. He was retired at the same time she was. His handler had been shot down in an ambush in Iraq. They were going to put Atlas down after he had been brought in with a shattered leg and a bullet wound. Everyone told her that he wasn’t worth saving but she saw a kindred spirit in him. He had seen and survived the drums of war. He helped her recover in the rehab facility and she put in the request to take him home with her. Her impeccable record allowed approval of her request immediately then it seemed her and Atlas were on their way home. They settled into what has become their routine very quickly. She would have a therapy session at seven but before then she decides to start breakfast.
  • Sunshine rayray
    Published 18 days ago
    Son

    Son

    "You are not the kind of guy who would be at a place like this at this time of the morning." I look up from the grave which sat right underneath a big beautiful willow tree, seeing my sister walking toward me and stopping not even three feet away. She looks at me and then down at the grave.
Vintage
  • Rebecca Smith
    Published 10 months ago
    Heroic Female Spies - World War Two

    Heroic Female Spies - World War Two

    Bravery. Whether you have a lot of it or only a little, at one point in your life you will need to be brave. Whether you have to give a speech to your bosses in a large boardroom, or you have to get a spider out of the bathroom – you will need to use your inner bravery. But whatever bravery is called upon, it’s unlikely you’ll ever have to face the terrifying situations thousands of female spies confronted in World War Two. But this group of pioneering women put all fears aside to help Britain and her allies win the war against Germany, through acts of incredible bravery. Their story deserves to be heard and their amazing achievements known.
  • Kenans Caune
    Published 3 years ago
    Of War

    Of War

    Also, known as the Prince of the Brigade, Tommy Prince was a Native American who was born in Manitoba, Canada in 1914. Tommy at an early age was forced to drop out of elementary school to feed his 11 siblings, mother and father. Growing up he quickly learned from his father who was a hunter how to use a rifle and a knife to be able to hunt the nearby wildlife in the native reserve that he lived in himself. Now, does he not sound like a modern-day Mowgli? He became an extremely talented marksman and tracker from all the days he spent hunting and gathering food for his family. Years later he worked as a tree feller as well as joined the cadets during his teen years. Now think back, what did you do when you were 14 years old? Suddenly the Second World War began, and due to Tommy being an Aboriginal he was rejected several times from the Canadian army as discrimination was a widespread fact at the time. Eventually, he was accepted and was assigned to the first Field Park Company of the Royal Canadian Engineers. There he was trained to be a sapper, which was the first step to his impressive skill set. If you’re unsure of what a sapper is, they were essentially engineers with demolitions expertise. Two years later he became a sergeant with the Canadian Parachute Battalion, however, soon after he volunteered for the first Special Service Force also known as the Devil’s Brigade.
  • Aaron Loftin
    Published 3 years ago
    Julius Caesar and the Historiography of the Battle of Alesia

    Julius Caesar and the Historiography of the Battle of Alesia

    Many historians have said that out of his entire life time, his best military achievement in Gaul was winning the Battle of Alesia. What makes this feat extraordinary is the scale and determination of the battle’s two opposing sides, but in what way did Caesar describe the battle of Alesia? On the side of the Gallic armies, an Arverni man named Vercingetorix led a rebellion against Rome bringing many of the tribes of Gaul together in a united front. Being that Gaul was a Roman province and Julius Caesar was its governor Caesar had to quell another Gallic uprising. Gallic wars background. Who started the rebellion and why?