collection
Hidden Figures

Hidden Figures

It's time to put the spotlight on historical heroines that time forgot. A look at female leaders, fighters, and change makers of past and present.

  • April Demarco
    Published 2 years ago
    Most Famous Female Engineers in History

    Most Famous Female Engineers in History

    From the 1800s to now, famous female engineers continue to make their mark on history, creating groundbreaking inventions that will alter our lives day to day. As huge milestones for women, and huge milestones for the world, each of these inventions are used to this day. And they weren't created with ease, as there were tireless hours spent, limitations due to gender prejudice in a male-dominated world, and even struggles with illness.
  • Leona Freebush
    Published 2 years ago
    The Heroic Horseback Librarians of The Great Depression

    The Heroic Horseback Librarians of The Great Depression

    The Great Depression came swiftly and severely, plunging America into poverty. Stock prices started slipping in September 1929. Within a month the market crashed and worldwide GDP fell by 15 percent. 15 million Americans were put out of work and the state of Kentucky, which was a poor state that had been made even poorer by the paralysed national economy, was one of the hardest hit. Food, education, and economic opportunity were scarce.
  • Mary Moon
    Published 2 years ago
    Plus Size People Who Inspire!

    Plus Size People Who Inspire!

    If you're someone that believes someone has to be a size 0 to be attractive then I don't think this post is for you. But if you're someone who needs inspiration to love yourself no matter what size, shape, height, skin colour, then this post is for you.
  • Fern Wigfield
    Published 2 years ago
    A Century of Corruption

    A Century of Corruption

    Last night at the Golden Globes, actors and actresses wore black to display their support of the Time’s Up movement, a campaign founded in response to the Harvey Weinstein allegations and subsequent Weinstein effect. The response in Hollywood since the watershed moment of the first allegations against Harvey Weinstein in October 2017 has been significant, but not surprising. Since Weinstein, there have been following allegations of abuse against a number of prominent names, including Kevin Spacey, Louis C.K., Charlie Rose, James Toback, Matt Lauer, Brett Ratner – the list is sadly exhaustive, and will most likely be continuously added to. But as appalling as these revelations are, they are far from shocking. Hollywood has been an abusive industry for its entire existence, forming over a century’s worth of heartbreaking stories of ‘casting couch’ abuse, manipulation and mistreatment, from the days of the silent era, through Hollywood’s golden age to the present day.
  • Shante Hernandez
    Published 2 years ago
    Judy Garland

    Judy Garland

    The beautiful Judy Garland was a legend that we all remember as Dorothy from the famous movie The Wizard of Oz. But before she became Dorothy and got lost in the land of Oz, she was born Francis Ethel Gumm on June 10, 1922 in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Judy Garland's parents were vaudeville professionals, so she started show business at a very young age. Judy was 2 years old. Her first public performance was singing "Jingle Bells." Then Judy Garland started singing with her two older sisters Susie and Jimmie. They formed a group together called "Gumm Sisters." Then in 1926, Judy Garland and her family moved to California where the Gumm Sisters studied singing and dancing. Their mother as being both the sister's manager and agent made them gigs after gigs. The Gumm Sisters had appeared in some films here and there. The sisters later changed their name to "The Garland Sisters." They changed their name after performing with comedian George Jessel in 1934. Also that is when little Francis changed her name to Judy Garland. The following year was when she would be a solo act and sign a movie contract with MGM when she was 13. Judy Garland debuted one special song called "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart." Shortly after debuting the song, her father passed away. But despite what happened, young Judy Garland started getting movie roles after movie roles. She starred along side her best friend Mickey Rooney in a few movies together. Love Finds Andy Hardy really helped the pair with stardom. The stress of working non-stop really got to Judy Garland. The studio gave her some medications to help with her weight and image. Then the time came in Judy Garland's life. In 1939, she starred in the movie that really made her a BIG star. The Wizard of Oz won Judy Garland an Academy Award. She went to star in more musicals like Strike Up the Band and Babes of Broadway with Mickey Rooney. And For Me and My Gal with Gene Kelly. Even though she was a big star, she did have a family. Judy Garland did get married more than twice. And she had three wonderful children named Liza Minnelli (American actress) and Lorna and Joey Luft. Then Judy Garland had a breakdown from all the working days and nights. In 1950 Judy Garland was dropped from MGM, because of all the problems she was having in her life. Then Judy Garland decided to get back to work and do more movies. A Star Is Born got her nominated for an Academy Award. As the 1960s approached, Judy Garland worked more on her singing than her acting. She won a Grammy and did her very own TV show with her and her two daughters. When her TV show ended, she did one last attempt to fame for acting. She did a Broadway show called At Home at a Palace. When she fell into some financial and personal trouble, she went to a London nightclub and perform. But she was in such bad shape. On June 22, 1969, the beautiful and talented Judy Garland passed away of an accidental overdose while she was in London. Judy Garland was a phenomenal singer and actress. Her daughters Liza and Lorna live their mother's legacy on and on. There have been books and movies made about Judy Garland and her life. The biopic Me and My Shadows: A Family Memoir really told the story about her life to fame and everything. One of the best biopics I seen. Judy Garland will always be Dorothy. She is finally able to fly and be over the rainbow.
  • A. Lello
    Published 2 years ago
    Marie Antoinette: Debunking the Myths

    Marie Antoinette: Debunking the Myths

    Everyone, for the most part, has at least heard the name of the most notorious queen, Marie Antoinette. If not her name, they've at least heard the infamous fable of the phrase: "Let them eat cake." For hardcore historians and fans like myself, it's a hard pill to swallow when your ill-informed teacher makes the mistake of asking the class "Who said let them eat cake?" and accepts the answer: "Marie Antoinette."
  • Sierra George
    Published 2 years ago
    The Unsung Women of WWII: The WASPs

    The Unsung Women of WWII: The WASPs

    If you've ever attended school, you must know about the Second World War and how countries all over the globe came together to fight a war of political ideology of every extreme. Democracy, Fascism, Totalitarianism and so much more. We hear every November about the heroes who fought for this country and how thankful we should be that they did so. I am thankful for those who sacrificed their own lives to fight for what's right for this country and for the rest of the world. But what if I told you that women were actually allowed to serve in combat during this war? Sounds crazy right? But these women didn't serve on the ground, they could be only be found in the sky.
  • Shante Hernandez
    Published 2 years ago
    Anne Frank

    Anne Frank

    The Diary of Anne Frank is a very popular, number-1 selling book in the whole wide world. Before the diary became popular, the beautiful young writer Anne Frank was born Annelies Marie Frank on June 12, 1929 in Frankfurt, Germany. She lived with her parents Otto Frank and Edith Frank-Holländer and older sister Margot Frank. Anne was born in a time where there was a lot of political chaos in Germany. Her family decided to move to Amsterdam when Adolf Hitler won the election. It was there where she attended school at Montessori. She was a very friendly, talkative, and outstanding young girl. She loved to read and do a lot of writing and journalism a lot. Even though she was very talkative, she was also secretive. She wouldn't even share with her best friends at school.
  • Em DiMonaco
    Published 2 years ago
    Queen Elizabeth II's Most Badass Moments

    Queen Elizabeth II's Most Badass Moments

    No matter where you live, the words "the Queen" almost certainly conjure up one world-famous monarch: Queen Elizabeth II, of the UK (and Canada, and Australia, and so on). In addition to being the longest-reigning and oldest living British monarch, she is also the grandmother of the ever-popular young Royal generation, Princes William and Harry (whose recent engagement to Suits actress Meghan Markle recently took the world by storm). But the 91-year-old Queen Elizabeth, or Lilibet, as her family calls her, is not all tea and crumpets and "my-husband-and-I"s.