personality disorder

Personality disorders are as complex as they are misunderstood; delve into this diagnosis and learn the typical cognitions, behaviors, and inner experience of those inflicted.

  • Perez U. Hamilton
    Published 9 days ago
    You Again, but Why?

    You Again, but Why?

    I want you no more. In your origin you seemed fruitful, but through the entirety of the process I saw you for what you really were. The salty drops fall on my meadows no longer. The reservoir from which they originate shall be depleted. These thoughts I have when you appear to me are of the nefarious kind. Like a Nosferatu, your thirst is unquenchable. However, this gluttonous greed that you withhold will be apprehended from your heart. Worry not though. These precious sins of yours shall be put back where they belong. The abyss that I was trapped in will be their new resting place. Seek them not, for you will never reach them. For none of us can return to the place that we were born. Once we decide to grab that light, we cannot return to the comfortable darkness. Not even you, darkness itself may return to it. While in nature you are dark, but it entitles you not to the bed of darkness.
  • Madison Mackenzie
    Published 13 days ago
    At Capacity

    At Capacity

    It was one of those dreary days where a grey filter covers the land. I remember it clearly because the old Allen Inn looked incredibly musty when I first saw it peering through the fog on that brisk November afternoon. It was a historical building from the 1800’s made of brick and covered with rich, green verdure like laced stockings crawling up its sides. The Inn was located not far from my childhood home and I can remember riding my bike past it as a child. My pigtails matched the pom-poms that dangled from my handlebars as I glided down Fowler Street. At the time, I didn’t know what the place was, I only ever heard my mom say, “You better settle down or you’re going to the Inn!” I figured she meant she was going to book me a room all by myself so she could have some peace and quiet at home. Peace and quiet, that’s why I had returned to the place, to soothe my mind.
  • Ver Armstrong
    Published about a month ago
    Unstable Relationships in BPD

    Unstable Relationships in BPD

    Disclaimer: The following account of the given NHS symptom relates solely to the writer and is, in no way, a blanket generalisation of how all people think it feel. It has been shared to potentially allow more understanding, or to allow other sufferers to take comfort knowing they aren't alone.
  • Ver Armstrong
    Published about a month ago
    Impulsive Behaviour in BPD (Trigger Warning)

    Impulsive Behaviour in BPD (Trigger Warning)

    TRIGGER WARNING: Self-harm, bullying, child abuse, sexual abuse
  • Ver Armstrong
    Published about a month ago
    Disturbed Patterns of Thinking in BPD

    Disturbed Patterns of Thinking in BPD

    Disclaimer: The following account of the given NHS symptom relates solely to the writer and is, in no way, a blanket generalisation of how all people think it feel. It has been shared to potentially allow more understanding, or to allow other sufferers to take comfort knowing they aren't alone.
  • Ver Armstrong
    Published about a month ago
    Emotional Instability in BPD

    Emotional Instability in BPD

    Disclaimer: The following account of the given NHS symptom relates solely to the writer and is, in no way, a blanket generalisation of how all people think it feel. It has been shared to potentially allow more understanding, or to allow other sufferers to take comfort knowing they aren't alone.
  • Jasmin
    Published about a month ago
    BPD & Lock Down

    BPD & Lock Down

    2020, what a year it has been so far. From September 2019 to January 2020 I had been going through what I would call a BPD slump. I was not myself at all, I had not been able to hold down a proper job within 2 years so was unemployed once again, I was acting on terrible impulses which was creating problems for myself and I was basically the kind of me I did not want to be.
  • Brenda Michael
    Published 2 months ago
    Borderlines and Relationships

    Borderlines and Relationships

    My name is Brenda and, I have had a long history of psychiatric issues. When I was 17 years old, I was diagnosed with borderline tendencies in my first psychiatric hospitalization. I was hospitalized because, I was seeking help, for self-harm issues, and, I would always seek help, if I ever struggled, with this again. However, the borderline personality disorder has stayed, with me.
  • Linda Williams
    Published 2 months ago
    Understanding the Dark Triad of Personality

    Understanding the Dark Triad of Personality

    The Dark Triad of Personality. What exactly is it? And what does it mean to be a Dark Triad member?
  • Amy Wildsmith
    Published 3 months ago
    Finding a Therapist for OCD

    Finding a Therapist for OCD

    It may seem stupid to double check that your new potential therapist knows about OCD as they're a therapist, they're there to help you right? And surely they wouldn't offer you their services if they didn't? Well, you'd like to think so but this isn't always the case. This articles was sparked this morning in my imagination after I attended an assessment at a new therapy practice in the hopes of finding a full time and long-term therapist.
  • TvV
    Published 3 months ago
    I’m not as evil as I might seem

    I’m not as evil as I might seem

    Welcome to my labyrinth of a mind. Don’t get confused. I’ve always known I was different. It used to bother me. I honestly thought I was an alien or mentally ill before I realized I am an INFJ. A turbulent one. A Cancerian too. The ONLY sign governed by the moon. Now I describe myself as a walking contradiction of authentic complexity. I have many truths.
  • Ashley Nestler, MSW
    Published 3 months ago
    Borderline Personality Disorder and Me

    Borderline Personality Disorder and Me

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is often categorized — in short — as a mental illness where the survivor exhibits explosive anger, impulsive behaviors, and unstable relationships — with romantic partners, as well as friends and family. Due to the destructive nature of these symptoms, BPD has almost become a bad word in the mental health community. As an MSW, I have come across professionals who won’t work with individuals who have been diagnosed with BPD due to the stereotypical “abusive” nature of the disease. However, the symptoms listed above provide an overgeneralized assumption of the disorder based on only three out of nine possible symptoms — and all symptoms are frequently linked to trauma. This overgeneralization of BPD marginalizes survivors of the illness by belittling or oversimplifying their experience — particularly those who don’t fall under the assumed criteria. Furthermore, it makes finding help extremely difficult, let alone receiving an appropriate diagnosis. There are four types of Borderline Personality Disorder that all exhibit differently, and to be diagnosed with BPD, one must exhibit five out of nine possible criteria. The variation of symptoms then puts the survivor on a sliding scale of 256 possible representations of the disorder. Because of this, no one person fits 100% into any one of the four categories of BPD due to the number of possible variations. Survivors often exhibit symptoms that put them in more than one category — and sometimes all four — but the categories help survivors, loved ones, and professionals better understand Borderline Personality Disorder, possible causes, and treatment options.