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Beyond the Blues

Beyond the Blues

Understanding depression is difficult; hear from Psyche's community of peers on their experiences with this mood disorder.

  • Bulky Babble
    Published 3 years ago
    Going in the Deep End

    Going in the Deep End

    I was asked one time on how my anxiety started. When having anxiety and dealing with it for many years, that answer was nearly impossible to answer. Before you know it, days turn into weeks, weeks turn into months, and on and on and on and on. Then you start asking yourself questions to determine the answer to the first question. Your brain takes you to the deaths of loved ones. Then the memories and emotions start flowing of the wonderful times you had with them. Before you know it, there are things rapidly stemming off in every direction like a chaotic flow chart without any end. Your anxiety that was only playing with you like a cat chasing a string has now become thoughts of regrets and what if's to take total control of all mental functions. Answers? Answers don't come easy when dealing with anxiety.
  • Rooster Robinson
    Published 3 years ago
    The Glorification of Depression and Its Disastrous Consequences

    The Glorification of Depression and Its Disastrous Consequences

    15 Habits of People With Concealed Depression
  • Mackenzie Lu
    Published 3 years ago
    What You Need to Know About Postpartum Depression

    What You Need to Know About Postpartum Depression

    Postpartum depression is hell on Earth, and I ought to know. After all, I've lived through it, and having gone through that misery, I can say that there is something decidedly terrible about the way that most people view postpartum depression in today's society.
  • Rowan Marley
    Published 3 years ago
    Common Myths About Depression

    Common Myths About Depression

    Depression is currently one of the most widespread mental illnesses in the world, and 6.7 percent of the American population will suffer from depression any given year. One would think that people would understand depression, considering how common it really is — but this is clearly not the case.