recovery

Your illness does not define you. It's your resolve to recover that does.

  • Katelynne Donoghue
    Published 6 months ago
    It Happened

    It Happened

    It happened. When I look back, I feel as if it was a different person, a different me, a different life, that it was not a chapter of this life that I am living now. But it did happen. No, it does not define me and no, I do not carry it around with me anymore, I have chosen to accept it because acceptance breeds peace and I deserve peace.
  • Lewis Jefferies
    Published 7 months ago
    How I've Recovered from My Suicide Attempt This Time Last Year

    How I've Recovered from My Suicide Attempt This Time Last Year

    From October 2018, my mental health began to deteriorate following the passing of my grandfather on 30th September 2018. Grief is different in everyone. Some know how to cope with it, whereas some don’t. For me, I’d never fully experienced grief. I’ve lost loved ones in before my grandfather passed last year, but I wasn’t old enough to understand grief overall.
  • Rebecca J Lee
    Published 7 months ago
    DBT and Me

    DBT and Me

    *Trigger warning—Talk of Suicidal Ideation
  • Rose Summers
    Published 7 months ago
    Halloween: PTSD Not Allowed!

    Halloween: PTSD Not Allowed!

    When you used to be in a relationship with someone that is now dead, what do you call them?
  • Cassidy Webb
    Published 8 months ago
    National Recovery Month: Together We Are Stronger

    National Recovery Month: Together We Are Stronger

    Every September is National Recovery Month. It is a time to celebrate people in recovery, spread awareness around the disease of addiction, and help shatter the stigma that often surrounds it.
  • india
    Published 8 months ago
    Personal

    Personal

    It’s not about them anymore.
  • Gillian May
    Published 9 months ago
    Four Steps to Help Navigate a Breakdown

    Four Steps to Help Navigate a Breakdown

    Years ago, I went through a breakdown that brought everything to a screeching halt and prompted an enormous change in my life.
  • ToriAnne Brinsley
    Published 9 months ago
    The Day Hospital and Beyond

    The Day Hospital and Beyond

    Once upon a time, in the days before Uber, I took a cab from my glitzy corporate job where I drank designer coffee drinks and carried designer, overpriced handbags (which I still do because they are AWESOME), and was dropped off at one the premier hospitals in Chicago. I was there because my then husband called a psyche intake meeting for my botched suicide attempt.
  • Maelyn Jeffers
    Published 9 months ago
    Healing

    Healing

    Lately, I have been having a lot of things weighing heavy on my mind. Weighing in on the scale at one million pounds is my childhood trauma. When this weight takes over, I begin to think about how life never really gave me the chance to dwell on my pain because it does what it’s good at doing, “it moved on.” I started to think about how my sisters went through a lot of traumatizing things as well, and they never got the chance to dwell on the pain, we never got to heal. After other thoughts, I began to think about how people go through so many things in their lives. Whether it’s from your childhood or adulthood, and they never get the chance to heal from it. The process of healing takes time, whether you are improving alone or with a support system. Regardless healing must happen; one of the reasons I feel like it is hard to heal is because of life. Many different versions of life happen for people; some people’s trauma is distracted by moving away, new job, new additions to the family, new friends, or even new relationships. When all these things happen, the trauma is pushed back, and the wound is still open. In my situation, after my trauma was acknowledged a big move occurred for my family and me, then at the age of 16 only two years after my ordeal ended, I was pregnant with my son. All the horrific things I had gone through were pushed back, and although it was still affecting me every day, I was so busy I was never able to bring it up again. Another reason I feel like people push back their trauma is that other people aren’t supportive of their healing. Both family and friends have a role in the healing process. Being supportive starts with communication, reaching out to someone and asking them how they’ve been doing after various situations is a start. There are adults now that have been through things as children, and they never healed from it because family members or friends weren’t supportive of their healing. Their mother, father, grandma, or uncle, etc. never talked to them about things they’ve been through, so they felt like it didn’t matter. The process is even worse when you’re an adult because you’ve been carrying the pain forever and other’s might not take what you’ve been through as traumatizing as it was then because it happened so long ago. As an adult, I can honestly say if I would’ve got the acknowledgment of what I went through in my past from a healthy support system I would be more healed at this point in my life. It is not okay to hold in the things you’ve been through because you feel like it is a waste of time talking about it or it happened so long ago that it doesn’t matter. It does matter, any pain that you’ve experienced matters when you haven’t healed from it. Whether it’s trauma from abuse, neglect, losing a job, finances, being robbed, it matters. A lot of people push their mental health to the side based on how people react to what they’ve been through.
  • Lalie Kavulich
    Published 9 months ago
    Bitters & Soda

    Bitters & Soda

    Bitters & Soda is a raw, honest and sometimes embarrassing perspective of what modern sobriety looks like outside of an organized program. This is a first hand account. It is not a step-by-step guide to getting sober nor is it a sermon on alcohol abstinence for one and for all. I am an alcoholic and this is my personal experience.
  • Ginger Curls
    Published 10 months ago
    Overcoming the Mess

    Overcoming the Mess

    I've been a hoarder for as long as I can remember. I keep useless shit, receipts from delis in Quebec, train tickets from France, the list goes on and on. I moved to a small town a little over two years ago, and never had anyone come over to my apartment because of the disaster it has always been in... I'm talking about clothes all over the floor (separate piles of clean and dirty), dishes all over the counters making it impossible for making any sort of actual food, and just mess and garbage everywhere. This is now all starting to change.
  • Lauren Ottewill
    Published 10 months ago
    “How to Stay Sane in a Crazy World”

    “How to Stay Sane in a Crazy World”

    Hi I’m Laurene Hope. In 2012 I came out of a Therapeutic community without a trace of Bpd after two years, where I learnt, how to sit with my pain and heal my childhood abuse issues with-out medication. Now if I can do it so can others. In the community I was reduced to feeling like a child again, through surrendering to the process. We had a validation bell, which you rang if and when you were triggered. The community and staff would then gather around and offer support. This would enable you to distract from your pain. The support could be a walk in the park or in my case some kind of chore to ground me. Bit by bit you were able to adjust. The community experience was a difficult one for me. I call it my own personal Holacaust as I’m Jewish. Like many others I couldn’t settle, due to my need to fight everything and everyone. I am also an ex war child who grew up in Israel.