collection
Only the Classics

Only the Classics

The roots from which poetry as we know it has flourished. Taking you back to the classical era, one stanza at a time.

  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 months ago
    "The Poems" by Propertius

    "The Poems" by Propertius

    The poet Propertius was an Latin Elegiac of the Augustan Period and his only surviving works are those of his four books of “Elegies”. This totals around 92 surviving poems and his more romantic side of poetry is dominated by a character named “Cynthia”. The romantic affair between Propertius and Cynthia takes wild turns and often turns either violent and turbulent or graphic and passionate. Common themes in the poems include: passion, romance, jealousy, violence, standards of love and courtship, lament, death and the afterlife, mythology, religion and ghosts. Propertius’s unconventional use of the Latin language have often made his texts and allusions within texts difficult to translate and edit. The surviving manuscripts of his poetry have led translators to often alter the texts and therefore corrupting them before the editing stage. Propertius’s boldness has often been said to exacerbate the problem of translation due to the way in which the syntax of the poetry is often incorrect. Be that as it may, themes, symbols and motifs are still clearly visible throughout the anthology. Propertius, being popular within his own lifetime but also a poet considered to be a scandal was also not really enjoyed by the other poets of his time and period. Horace had once stated a veiled attack on him and Callimachus as did Quintilian who states that the poet was not as popular as he made himself out to be.
  • V. Plut
    Published 4 months ago
    If Basho Owned a Camera

    If Basho Owned a Camera

    Matsuo Kinsaku, or Basho, as he is more commonly known, born 1644 in Japan, considered to be the master of Haiku poetry, would today perhaps take a liking to the camera, especially the iphone and smaller mirrorless cameras. They could easily have been transported in his backpack on a trip into the north country of Japan — but would it have changed his poetry?
  • Shawna Holley
    Published 2 years ago
    Field of Flowers

    Field of Flowers

    I saw a field of flowers On a sunny day I sat down to watch them As they began to sway In the breeze so gentle They then began to say
  • Aaliyah Baez
    Published 2 years ago
    To Love or Not to Love

    To Love or Not to Love

    To love or not to love—that is the question: Whether ‘tis easy to express your feelings And to give your heart away. Or to suffer from loneliness
  • J. Rafael Ponciano
    Published 2 years ago
    Sonnet No.2

    Sonnet No.2

    O, Bane of Argos, pray tell truthfully, When by thy crafty hand a lyre thou lent To Leto’s son, Apollo, faithfully, Was mischief for thy brother thine intent?
  • Logan Solo
    Published 2 years ago
    Templar Rain

    Templar Rain

    “Why dost thou fret?” inquired the knight Behind his colored shield “Thy face is long, thy eyes as cold As this sword that I wield.”
  • Lucas Joanis
    Published 2 years ago
    Heat

    Heat

    The Sun arising feasts the sleet of snow, Quenching yeast with water from its melt, Umb’ring the boreal bunny pelt, Emaciating winter cajoled b’low.
  • Ayesha Javed
    Published 2 years ago
    A Rendition of Sonnet 18

    A Rendition of Sonnet 18

    “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more scorching with thine words not temperate. And like the rough winds, harsh and in constant flux, of may.
  • Hannah Javens
    Published 2 years ago
    The Wrong Sailor Taken

    The Wrong Sailor Taken

    O’ Hope–O’ frail thing made from feathers and sea wind– What do you see when you gaze downward? Our prize has been won with hard-earned blood and steel