collection
Only the Classics

Only the Classics

The roots from which poetry as we know it has flourished. Taking you back to the classical era, one stanza at a time.

  • Amariah Torres
    Published 3 years ago
    We Art Not Frighted

    We Art Not Frighted

    We art not frighted from the bloodied field;
  • Amariah Torres
    Published 3 years ago
    Silent Words

    Silent Words

    This wind billows like the silent words thou hath spoken,
  • Eyn Ione
    Published 3 years ago
    Sonnet I

    Sonnet I

    O’er the break of dawn hath thy clouds come,
  • Heidi Wilson
    Published 3 years ago
    Dream... My Soul

    Dream... My Soul

    Dream, my soul parched of light,
  • Robert Montalbano
    Published 3 years ago
    Wanderer's Soul

    Wanderer's Soul

    Look upon the very land we sit upon
  • Spencer Barrett
    Published 3 years ago
    Struggle Not

    Struggle Not

    Still winged soft my feather flock o' kin.
  • Louis Nicholas
    Published 3 years ago
    T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land"

    T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land"

    "The Waste Land" is a wrathful attack on modern civilisation, stretching not only to the horror of the Great War but attacking the society that bore it. In his sobering evocations of ancient myths and Shakespearean lines, T.S. Eliot contrasts contemporary society with the past, atheism with belief; thus bringing about the breakdown and dysfunction of the society of "Wasteland."
  • Louis Nicholas
    Published 3 years ago
    Homeric Heroism

    Homeric Heroism

    To what extent did Homer view Odysseus as a heroic figure?
  • Tomas Alejandro
    Published 3 years ago
    My Cyclops

    My Cyclops

    Who is this giant, this legend from afar?