Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Focus in Film: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Author of: "The Filmmaker's Guide" series

Email: [email protected]

Interests: Film, Literature and Bob Dylan

How does it work?
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 12 hours ago
    Large Cherry Almond Sharing Cake!

    Large Cherry Almond Sharing Cake!

    Of course, you probably know me very well for invading Vocal with my film studies stuff and articles entitled ‘a filmmaker’s guide’. I have often explained that I love to bake as well. Since I was young, I have loved the idea, the creativity and the relaxation of baking different things. I love to make macarons, layer cakes and gingerbread in particular and the activity of it really gets me away from my laptop (where I’m sure you know that I spend most of my life). So, I hope you enjoy me talking about what I bake and why I bake it complete with pictures (if not very good) of me actually baking, my baked goods in the process of being created and when they’re finished. I’m really happy to share this with you. And if you like, you can show me your baking (yes, I spend a lot of time writing, but I also spend a lot of time reading other people’s articles!), I would love to see it. Since I was in school, I was always interested in creating things, whether that be pieces of writing, welding things to make small statues or baking foods and making sweets (candy, if you’re American). I hope you enjoy looking at some of the stuff that has honestly kept me sane, because I seem to be going slightly mad.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 13 hours ago
    Book Review: "The Magician of Lublin" by Isaac Bashevis Singer

    Book Review: "The Magician of Lublin" by Isaac Bashevis Singer

    As you can tell, I have gotten back into reading Isaac Bashevis Singer lately and honestly, I am really enjoying myself. His books are very deep and mystical with powerful, engaging and very human storylines. This one in particular is about a magician named Yasha who lives his life in 'sin' [as some characters reflect]. He has a wife, but he is unfaithful. He has a grounding, but he seeks fame and fortune. He has these deep philosophical interjections about who he will be when he dies and there are these large descriptions of the sun, moon and stars that almost belittle Yasha in the bigger, everlasting space of the universe. Yasha is a flawed man yes, but he is also hopeful, passionate and he performs magic ironically in his personal life by deceiving others he cares about. You may grow to like the character, but you do not respect him. You may grow to understand the character, but you will never figure him out. Yasha, by the end of the book, is still a mystery and an enigma. He is a puzzle and yet, his narrative has already been solved.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 13 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Alternate History

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Alternate History

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 13 hours ago
    The Beast Under the Stairs

    The Beast Under the Stairs

    The beast underneath the stairs howls at the lightbulb above its head and crouches down under the blanket of shame. The moonlight doesn’t come through the grates
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 13 hours ago
    Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

    Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    Full Metal Jacket (1987)

    Full Metal Jacket (1987)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.