Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Writer: "Filmmaker's Guide"

Focus: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Instagram: @anniethebritindian

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  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 2 hours ago
    My First 20 Books of 2020

    My First 20 Books of 2020

    We all know how much I love to read and how I love to read more than one book a day. Now, if you'd like to know what I'm reading on a regular basis then you can follow me on Instagram. But, here I would like to share with you the first twenty books I've read this year simply to save us the time of going through all of them at once at the end of the year.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 5 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "Albert Nobbs" (2011)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "Albert Nobbs" (2011)

    I initially didn't think too much of this film when it first came out, I thought it was just yet another period drama. But how wrong I was... This film is a modern masterpiece of disguise and intrigue, a film of secrecy and darkness. There is something incredibly tense about this film that keeps you on the edge of your seat throughout even the every day life of the manor. The tagline is spoken almost as part of the dialogue in the film when the doctor speaks to Albert and says "We are all disguised as ourselves..." that's more of a realisation moment by the audience. But let's move on to the review for now...
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 6 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Cary Grant

    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Cary Grant

    Cary Grant was born on the 18th of January, 1904 in Bristol, England. The English Born-American actor was the second child of a tailor and a seamstress (which explains why his clothes were always so good!). Be that as it may, his mother was suffering from clinical depression and his father was an alcoholic. His mother was placed in a mental institution and his father had told him, after some time, that his mother had died. Cary Grant grew up not really being very close to his parents until his father not only remarried and started a new family but he also found out when his father was dying, that his mother was still alive.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 6 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide: "Hard Candy" (2005)

    A Filmmaker's Guide: "Hard Candy" (2005)

    This thriller is possibly one of the most intense thrillers you'll ever watch that has cropped up straight out of 21st century nightmares. The 21st century nightmare in this film involves what happens when a little girl speaks online to an older man and I can honestly say that if you were a little girl (a minor) online in the first decade of the 21st century you probably experienced you fair share of older men wanting to chat/meet up with you. Saying "no" for some girls can be difficult I know, but seriously it wasn't very difficult for me because as soon as I told them my mom was a cop shit turned. But in some cases, the girl can be terrified and seriously, I think that hitting on minors is a problem for a lot of men from the top ranks to the bottom jobs - I really don't know what it is with men and either little girls or women behaving like little girls. It kind of grosses me out.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Machinist" (2004)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Machinist" (2004)

    This film is a god damn masterpiece and now, I have probably seen it about four or five times. Every single time you watch it, you see something you did not pick up before and every time you see the film the meaning of it gets closer and closer until you see something else and that changes the whole meaning entirely and you're back at square one. It's a film that constantly changes meaning.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Shakespeare Enigma" (2011)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Shakespeare Enigma" (2011)

    So let's start with a bit of a history. I am a huge Shakespeare fan. I've read all the plays, I went to see a ton of them in the theatre and I've even got a ton of Shakespeare merchandise including bags, posters, etc. I have been a Shakespeare super-fan for well over ten years now and this is the very first time I have come across such an incriminating film. Unfortunately enough for myself I am also a huge Christopher Marlowe fan, owning the same amount of merchandise, having read and seen all the plays performed live and even having studied Dr. Faustus for nearly every year of my university life because it is so damn good. Marlowe and Shakespeare may have been around at the same time, they may have had a similar (ish) writing style and they may have had a similar target audience. But to suggest that they are the same person is a theory tried, tested and failed long before this film even came about in 2011.