Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Focus in Film: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Author of: "The Filmmaker's Guide" series

Email: [email protected]

How does it work?
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 17 hours ago
    Layered Snowmen Desserts

    Layered Snowmen Desserts

    Of course, you probably know me very well for invading Vocal with my film studies stuff and articles entitled ‘a filmmaker’s guide’. I have often explained that I love to bake as well. Since I was young, I have loved the idea, the creativity and the relaxation of baking different things. I love to make macarons, layer cakes and gingerbread in particular and the activity of it really gets me away from my laptop (where I’m sure you know that I spend most of my life). So, I hope you enjoy me talking about what I bake and why I bake it complete with pictures (if not very good) of me actually baking, my baked goods in the process of being created and when they’re finished. I’m really happy to share this with you. And if you like, you can show me your baking (yes, I spend a lot of time writing, but I also spend a lot of time reading other people’s articles!), I would love to see it. Since I was in school, I was always interested in creating things, whether that be pieces of writing, welding things to make small statues or baking foods and making sweets (candy, if you’re American). I hope you enjoy looking at some of the stuff that has honestly kept me sane, because I seem to be going slightly mad.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 18 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Carpe Diem

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Carpe Diem

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 18 hours ago
    Out of the Depths...

    Out of the Depths...

    I know I’ve been saying for a long time that I will do something lifestyle based and so, I am doing a lifestyle blog about things that happen on a day-to-day basis. I will be talking about my experiences with various things, some things will come back over and over again because my days are very much similar. If something else happens then it happens. Hopefully, you and I can get along and I can go along and tell you a little bit of a story about this experience I’ve had and then we’re going to talk about it. I’m going to discuss my reaction and my thoughts on the experience afterwards. Not only am I thinking about getting a dialogue going, but I’m also looking to make friends with people who have probably had similar experiences to me. Not only that though, maybe we can have a bit of a laugh and rethink this shit - maybe our minds can be changed and enlightened together. Or, you can just be here to enjoy the story and listen to me ramble on. If you want to read this in my voice then I kind of sound like a cross between Freddie Mercury and Scar from the “Lion King”. So get the full ‘experience’ there. So immersive.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 18 hours ago
    Vertigo (1958)

    Vertigo (1958)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 18 hours ago
    Book Review: "Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eye-Witness Account" by Miklós Nyiszli

    Book Review: "Auschwitz: A Doctor's Eye-Witness Account" by Miklós Nyiszli

    I'm not going to lie when I say that this book was something I read some weeks ago and then, unusually, spread across a few days of reading time. I couldn't bring myself to read the whole thing in one sitting even though it was a pretty short book. It was just too graphic and too uneasy to sit there and take in all at once. I spread it out over a few days in order to pace myself. Don't worry, I did the same thing with a number of other graphic war books as well. Some books go into some detail, but when you're reading a book by someone who was actually there and it goes into the details like the smell of dead bodies and children who suffer horribly, you have to put it down if you want to eat or sleep that day.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)

    A Filmmaker's Review: The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)

    An almost three and a half hour long film about the life and death of Jesus Christ, this film not only misses out no details but it also has a pretty great cast of characters. I have to say that honestly, it was so long that I sometimes I felt myself zoning out but the realism of rioting after the death of King Herod and the execution of the masses upon the warning of the birth of Jesus to the King made it more exciting to watch. I have seen many films about the life of Jesus Christ and yet this one has to be one of my favourites.