Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Writer: "Filmmaker's Guide"

Focus: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Instagram: @anniethebritindian

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  • Annie Kapur
    Published 13 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to Adaptation: Dashiell Hammett

    A Filmmaker's Guide to Adaptation: Dashiell Hammett

    Dashiell Hammett died on the 10th of January, 1961 - but by then he had amassed a great amount of noir literature written with characters we love like Sam Spade, Nick and Nora etc. He was a great writer and ever since his birth on the 27th of May, 1894 in Maryland, USA - he has been a continuous name mentioned when we talk about the great film noir. After he basically created hard-boiled crime fiction, many thought it would be great to adapt his works into films.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 14 days ago
    Literature

    Literature

    I started my love of reading at an early age of about 6 or 7. I would come home from school with my book and sit down to read. At that age it was the normal Harry Potter or the like that was popular. Mainly, it was the fantasy books. I would read a couple of books here and there and it was alright, I'd enjoy what I was reading. And then, I thought I would just go and enjoy it some more.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 15 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Elvis Presley

    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Elvis Presley

    On the 8th of January, 1935, Elvis Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi. He wasn't rich, not even close to rich - probably not even close to average earning. Be that as it may, he was found - they made the records and he became known simply as "The King". Unfortunately, in 1977 - Elvis Presley succumbed to his overworking schedule and accidentally died from taking some horrid pills. But, from when he was making the records to this day and beyond - there are still people who listen to Elvis Presley, old and young.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 16 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Passion of the Christ" (2004)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Passion of the Christ" (2004)

    "The Passion of the Christ" (2004) is one of the great masterpieces of indie drama/historical cinema. Directed by Mel Gibson, the film entirely comprises of real languages spoken by and at the time of Jesus Christ such as: Aramaic, Hebrew and Latin. It features the last 12 hours of Jesus Christ's life before he is sent to the cross and, through this, has many flashbacks, side-stories and multi-narratives that tell various stories of the disciples, the passion of Jesus Christ and the gospels in a range of forms.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 17 days ago
    The Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Eddie Redmayne

    The Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Performances: Eddie Redmayne

    Eddie Redmayne was born on the 6th of January, 1982 in Westminster, London, England. From a very early age, he was into his theatre and plays - performing everything from Shakespeare to the modern play. Not only did he do theatre, but obviously we know him because of his transition into film. By 2006, Redmayne was at lead in the film "Like Minds" (2006) with Toni Collette (Hereditary (2014)) after showing a great performance in "The Good Shepherd" (2006) alongside Angelina Jolie and Matt Damon. Amassing a great amount of fame for his portrayal of Stephen Hawking in the film "The Theory of Everything" (2014), Redmayne went on to win his Best Actor Academy Award.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 17 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Most Visually Stunning Films

    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Most Visually Stunning Films

    To call a film 'visually stunning' we normally mean that some of the shots look amazing. Well, that's exactly the case. Some films can look incredibly grand and have some amazing cinematography work on them - it doesn't necessarily mean that they have to show you breath-taking nature shots. It does, however, mean that the shot in some way must move you emotionally. There must be some emotion in the grandeur of the shot that makes you stop and stare at it, sometimes even just rewind the film to see it again or even take a picture of it and set it as your wallpaper.