Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Writer: "Filmmaker's Guide"

Focus: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Instagram: @anniethebritindian

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  • Annie Kapur
    Published 13 days ago
    20 Books of 2020 (Pt.32)

    20 Books of 2020 (Pt.32)

    Well, we're underway into the 600s now and I can honestly say that it has been a great ride, but we're not stopping here! In this article introduction, I want to talk shortly about reading books and reading kindle books/ebooks etc. and the way in which we see differences between them.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 13 days ago
    "Kafka was the Rage" by Anatole Broyard

    "Kafka was the Rage" by Anatole Broyard

    The first time I ever read “Kafka was the Rage” by Anatole Broyard, I was sitting on a coach on my way to a university trip for five days of intense work. I was in the second year of my undergraduate degree and had just about turned twenty years’ old. My first experience of reading it was brilliant and I read the whole thing in one sitting, much to the confusion of my lecturer since I was the only one not talking on the coach ride. It ended up with me talking to my lecturer about how good the book was - and it was awesome. “Kafka was the Rage” really influenced my world view of how the planet worked after the second world war. It made me believe less in the fact that everything went back to normal and believe more in the fact that there were actually a great number of problems after the war, especially concerning these displaced soldiers pretty much left to their own devices. It is one of those stories that simply touches you with its realism.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 14 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Films: David O. Selznick

    A Filmmaker's Guide to the Best Films: David O. Selznick

    David O. Selznick is synonymous with the Hollywood Golden Age. He was one of the foremost producers for films by Alfred Hitchcock, Carol Reed, Victor Fleming and many more. As one of the biggest producers in Hollywood at the time, David O Selznick managed to make a big name for himself. He worked on films that today are known as classics of their genre and some of the greatest films ever made.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 15 days ago
    "Tess of the D’Urbervilles" by Thomas Hardy

    "Tess of the D’Urbervilles" by Thomas Hardy

    It has been just about ten years since I first read Thomas Hardy’s magnum opus “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” and I read it mostly because it was everywhere. I remember it being in bookstores with these amazing clothbound covers on the copies and I managed to save come money in order to get myself one. This was how I discovered the book. I was simply in a bookstore looking at the clothbound edition of “Anna Karenina” when near it was Thomas Hardy’s “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” and simply realising I hadn’t read it and it looked interesting, I bought it. (Since I also already had a copy of “Anna Karenina” - nobody was letting me buy another one). My first reading experience of “Tess” was pretty disturbing because I found myself really upset for a few days afterwards because of the way I believe Tess was treated unjustly. The book managed to change my opinion of what could happen to people who were the protagonists of their own novels, and I thought that sort of stuff only happened in Shakespeare’s plays. How wrong I was.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 16 days ago
    World Refugee Day: Ten Books on Refugee and Immigrant Voices

    World Refugee Day: Ten Books on Refugee and Immigrant Voices

    Every year on the 20th of June, World Refugee Day is celebrated internationally as it is a day where we respect and honour the most vulnerable members of our society who constantly risk their lives in hope that they can find safety.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 17 days ago
    "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe

    "Doctor Faustus" by Christopher Marlowe

    I first read this book when I was twelve years’ old and I’m going to admit that it was very difficult to read, even as a girl who had already studied Shakespeare by that age - I had some difficulty and had my dictionary on hand and my Latin dictionary on hand when they were required. I discovered this book literally because I found it. When I say I found it I mean that I was looking through the Shakespeare books and it was amongst them. I thought it looked fairly interesting and so I picked it up and began to read. I understood nothing and so, I took it home to the comfort of my dictionaries. For the next twelve years, I would read “Dr. Faustus” at least once every year because of the fact it had enthralled me and I was always one of those people who were trying to work out whether I was seeing an actual ending or one of the possible endings to the play. It’s an intriguing script with a ton of grand references, speeches and monologues. I love the entire thing and to this day, it is my favourite play of all time.