Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Focus in Film: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Author of: "The Filmmaker's Guide" series

Email: [email protected]

How does it work?
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 10 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Lighthouse" (2019)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "The Lighthouse" (2019)

    I had been meaning to watch this film ever since it had first come out but was cynical about the premise because I had heard somewhere that a sea monster and some cult-like shit was involved. I decided to pass on the film for over a year and so, when I did get around to watch it I became surprised by the fact that this was not something I was concentrating on in the film. What I was concentrating on, in fact, was the slowly declining sanity of the two men in the lighthouse and the splicing of various scenes together that, without the context of the drinking, the loss of food and the lack of human contact, would make little sense. In order to see the decline of their sanity, you have to really take it all in. However, this film does have its disadvantages as well and we will discuss the pros and cons briefly as we go through this review.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 10 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: How Do We Measure a Great Performance in Film?

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: How Do We Measure a Great Performance in Film?

    Film is a fairly versatile subject when it comes to defining a great performance because a lot of it comes from and can be based on public opinion, subjectiveness and unanimous agreement. These three aspects of opinion, though very different, are normally rooted in some form of reason. Whilst the performance of Daisy Ridley in the new Star Wars trilogy is debated by many, the performance of Cate Blanchett in “The Aviator” and “I’m Not There” is pretty much unchallenged as examples of great performances on screen. The performances of Daniel Day-Lewis in “There Will Be Blood” and Al Pacino in “The Godfather” are unanimously known as some of the greatest performances of the 21st and 20th century respectively. The main question therefore is not whether these performances are actually good or great, because in all respects they definitely are. But the question is actually about how we can value a performance as great. Is it mainly because of the work of method actor Sir Daniel Day-Lewis? Is it the superior knowledge of one of the greatest Shakespearean Actors in all of history, Al Pacino? Or is it the modern day Katharine Hepburn-esque ideals of Cate Blanchett? The main thing to investigate is what makes a great performance ‘great’, why we rate them as such and what are the components and criteria that performances need to meet in order for them to be associated as such.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 10 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "American Psycho" (2000)

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "American Psycho" (2000)

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we are going to explore some of the films that have changed our outlook of the possibilities in cinema in some way, shape or form. These can include, but are not limited to: revolutionary cinematography, narratives that challenge the social structure and the common view, trademark styles of auter cinema, brilliant adaptations of novels and other works, films of philosophical value and films that touch our hearts and souls with their incredible underlying messages and morals. Within each of the films in this chapter there is a certain something that makes them special and a certain something that makes them linger long after we have watched them for the first time. Lasting impressions are difficult to create, but I think that the films we will briefly touch on in this chapter are some of the films we will never ever forget.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 10 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House" (Netflix, 2016)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House" (Netflix, 2016)

    This film, released to Netflix in 2016, is a grand mixture between gothic romance and strange, almost Hitchcockian, vibes. I would not call it a perfect horror movie, but it is definitely enjoyable to watch because the gothic and the supernatural connections really resonate through the screen as the narration beats on. The pros and cons to this movie are many, but the performances are definitely an advantage, giving this film a highly expressive edge in which both women, Lily and Polly, seem to be connected by the fact that they could physically not see what was coming. With Lily admitting that she has not been able to see Polly until recently and Polly being physically blindfolded before being bludgeoned to death. The strange noises around the Blum residence and the psychological torture of the protagonist in being constantly mistaken for a then unknown women named Polly seem to come out in whispers throughout the film.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 11 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "Citizen Kane" (1941)

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "Citizen Kane" (1941)

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we are going to explore some of the films that have changed our outlook of the possibilities in cinema in some way, shape or form. These can include, but are not limited to: revolutionary cinematography, narratives that challenge the social structure and the common view, trademark styles of auter cinema, brilliant adaptations of novels and other works, films of philosophical value and films that touch our hearts and souls with their incredible underlying messages and morals. Within each of the films in this chapter there is a certain something that makes them special and a certain something that makes them linger long after we have watched them for the first time. Lasting impressions are difficult to create, but I think that the films we will briefly touch on in this chapter are some of the films we will never ever forget.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 12 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "Midsommar" (2019)

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: "Midsommar" (2019)

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we are going to explore some of the films that have changed our outlook of the possibilities in cinema in some way, shape or form. These can include, but are not limited to: revolutionary cinematography, narratives that challenge the social structure and the common view, trademark styles of auter cinema, brilliant adaptations of novels and other works, films of philosophical value and films that touch our hearts and souls with their incredible underlying messages and morals. Within each of the films in this chapter there is a certain something that makes them special and a certain something that makes them linger long after we have watched them for the first time. Lasting impressions are difficult to create, but I think that the films we will briefly touch on in this chapter are some of the films we will never ever forget.