Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Focus in Film: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Author of: "The Filmmaker's Guide" series

Email: [email protected]

Interests: Film, Literature and Bob Dylan

How does it work?
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Existentialism

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Existentialism

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    The Maltese Falcon (1941)

    The Maltese Falcon (1941)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    Book Review: "Selected Poems" by Joseph Brodsky

    Book Review: "Selected Poems" by Joseph Brodsky

    Joseph Brodsky’s poetry is an imaginative, beautiful piece of work about the way in which we can see magic and style, fluency and control flow through Russian Poetry even after the likes of Anna Akhmatova, Leo Tolstoy etc. are no longer around. Brodsky takes concepts such as love and war and interweaves them into the symbols of darkness, nature and many more symbols of emotions to do with death and loss. Brodsky’s poetry is a powerful blend of melancholy and hope, grief and regaining, timelessness and patience. It is simply beautiful to read and is that poetry that you have to read out loud or it just does not have the same ring to it.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    Bob Dylan's "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues"

    Bob Dylan's "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues"

    This is a song that I have loved for many years in many forms. There’s the album version on “Highway 61 Revisited” (1965) and then there’s the version on “No Direction Home” which is also pretty amazing in a different key. I want to have a quick look at what I think this song means and honestly, I want to have a look at how the song sounds. I think there’s enough critical analysis on deeper meanings in Bob Dylan’s lyrics for you to check out by people who have, to Bob Dylan’s own dismay, studied him for fifty or so years. My reviews on Bob Dylan are purely for entertainment purposes. Why? The poetics are great, the lyrics are amazing and wild, the song sounds good and his singing voice is seriously underrated.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    Book Review: "The Armies of the Night" by Norman Mailer

    Book Review: "The Armies of the Night" by Norman Mailer

    “You, Lowell, beloved poet of many, what do you know of the dirt and the dark deliveries of the necessary? What do you know of dignity hard-achieved, and dignity lost through innocence, and dignity lost by sacrifice for a cause one cannot name. What do you know about getting fat against your will, and turning into a clown of an arriviste baron when you would rather be an eagle or a count, or rarest of all, some natural aristocrat from these damned democratic states.”
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 3 days ago
    Citizen Kane (1941)

    Citizen Kane (1941)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.