Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Focus in Film: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Author of: "The Filmmaker's Guide" series

Twitter: @AnnieApprox

IG: @AnnieApproximately

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  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 10 hours ago
    Book Review: "Transit" by Anna Seghers

    Book Review: "Transit" by Anna Seghers

    This book may be better written than others, but there is a real lack of philosophical reflection passages for a book that claims to be most about the existential. When it does happen, it is well written. But it just does not do it enough nor does it go in-depth enough about the philosophical viewpoint of the narrator. I think that this is because the character has no real traits that match up or associate with the author and so the author finds it difficult to assume the existential points in his head without being reductive. It is played safe, but research could have made the character a lot more well-built and thoroughly examined. I feel like we just get one thing after another and there is no real time to stop and stand, just admiring the characters and their inner beings. This obviously makes the relationships between characters suffer as we do not feel like we know them enough to care about them properly.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 10 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Idealism

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: Idealism

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    Book Review: "Selected Poems" by Federico Garcia Lorca

    Book Review: "Selected Poems" by Federico Garcia Lorca

    When I first read Federico Garcia Lorca, I was only about sixteen and I cannot remember exactly what I was reading because it was not a book. It was on a sheet of paper and it was one of his poems. The only thing I did remember [because I wrote it in my journal] was that it was 'revolutionary' in language [is how I put it]. Through reading a book filled the selected best poems of Lorca, I have come to re-establish what that means. I wrote it to mean that the images that I was reading of Lorca and relating it to the context of the Spanish Civil War in which he had been active in, this would have been a revolutionary act and may have been one of the reasons that ultimately and unfortunately, he was killed. The intense liberation of human emotion in the poems may have been one of the reasons why the Spanish Army were not too fond of Lorca's writings and why Lorca, in the many years after the Civil War, became an icon for freedom, revolution and basically one of the heroes of Spain.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide to: The Everyman

    A Filmmaker's Guide to: The Everyman

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    Bringing Up Baby (1938)

    Bringing Up Baby (1938)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    Un Chien Andalou (1929)

    Un Chien Andalou (1929)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.