Annie Kapur

Annie Kapur

Film and Writing (M.A)

Writer: "Filmmaker's Guide"

Focus: Adaptation from Literature, Horror Filmmaking Styles and Auter Cinema

Instagram: @anniethebritindian

How does it work?
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    The Best Works: Nathaniel Hawthorne

    The Best Works: Nathaniel Hawthorne

    Biography
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    "The Aeneid" by Virgil

    "The Aeneid" by Virgil

    It’s been about nine or ten years since I first read Virgil’s “Aeneid” and there’s a strange reason behind why I even read it in the first place. I found it in a beautiful copy at a bookstore. It was clothbound and patterned. The reason I actually picked it up was because I was watching a strange cartoon on the internet the previous day that was all to do with romans, I can’t remember exactly what it was but when I opened “The Aeneid”, the cartoons reminded me of the ones from the video - just drawn a billion times better. My first reading experience of “The Aeneid” was actually really strange because I remember trying to bullet point exactly what was happening all the way through the book and yet, I didn’t really understand what happened at the end because it didn’t really end at all. This book really ended up changing my opinion on the possibilities for poetry. It was a whole new poem with a great amount of drama. It was an epic in every sense of the word and I loved it so much that I ended up reading it every year since. I studied it for my undergraduate dissertation and I even got some people in to it online as well. It’s a brilliant poem with some great characters and history.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    July 4th: A Celebration of American Literature

    July 4th: A Celebration of American Literature

    American Independence Day is a great day, even though I am not American and nor do I live in America, I like to see how our friends across the Atlantic are celebrating this auspicious occasion. Filled with fireworks, party foods, gatherings of friends and family, this is set to be incredible day complete with unforgettable memories and happiness all around. American Independence Day is obviously the day where America celebrate being free of their overlords in Britain and became their own country, their own power and their own land. I think it’s a brilliant day to celebrate the works of fiction and nonfiction that came out of America due to its rapidly changing scene. From the late 1700s to the present, the USA has undergone so many changes in their artistic movements and so many social reforms that it is difficult to really count where one ends and another begins. I would like to celebrate alongside our friends across the Atlantic by offering a book set in every state of the USA. From the Southern Gothic to the Jazz Age, from the Harlem Renaissance to the 80s Transgressive Era and from Civil War Literature to the Post-Modern Destruction of the American Dream. American Literature has so much to offer us in terms of characters like the loveable George and Lennie from Steinbeck’s “Of Mice and Men” or the regrets of characters like Thomas Sutpen from Faulkner’s “Absalom, Absalom!”, the terrifying prospect felt by John Unger in Fitzgerald’s “Diamond as Big as the Ritz” and even the innocence of one of the most beloved character from any American Literature Work ever, little Scout Finch of Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird”. From fiction to nonfiction, poetry and back again, American Literature is endless in its surprises and innovation…
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 4 days ago
    "Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secession to Loyalty" by John W. De Forest

    "Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secession to Loyalty" by John W. De Forest

    This book represents the way in which learning from each other can be a struggle especially in the midst of a war. But, the American Civil War is more than just war politics and a class struggle, it is also about race and slavery and humanity. There is also a great amount of violent language and the exploration I did into this book was to do with the way in which the characters talk about the war and what the reader learns about the view of the war throughout the novel. We get firsthand character judgements and a range of differing opinions to the way in which the war impacts the younger generation - both positively and negatively. When the reader encounters more humane characters, they are in no way perfect or even progressive for our own day, but when it comes to the American Civil War and the other characters who are brilliant examples of the racially insensitive and the racially abusive stereotypes, it makes the progressive characters obviously look more progressive than they actually are. Thus, we have this range of different characters that mostly depend on the way in which other characters too are viewed in the book.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 4 days ago
    10 Books: Fallen Women

    10 Books: Fallen Women

    Fallen Women in literature actually has its own genre concerning women who gain agency through marriage and love affairs etc. and then, have their secrets found out or are violently mistreated and so, fall from this agency back down to either abject poverty or even worse, death. The literature of fallen women were most famous during the 1700s and 1800s with women being seen as more than alive for their agency in the 1900s and 2000s. Be that as it may, we can find fallen women in literature even in early eras of artistic movements. In Ancient Greece, we have the Orestian Trilogy and Sophocles’ Theban Plays which both contain fallen women, and in Shakespeare we can find fallen women in Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello and even in aspects of Julius Caesar. The fallen woman sub-genre has been around for ages throughout literary history, but became more and more famous in the decadent eras of the 1700s and 1800s partially because of the adornment of women of the aristocracy. The scandal that was created around women of the richer classes who required to hold themselves with decorum but ended up becoming involved with acts of degeneracy and the such. Readers were very much used to tragedies involving men and so, from the decadent courts of the Enlightenment and Romanticist Era we get women becoming more involved in tragedy, most obviously inspired by the richness and vulgarity of the Baroque and Rococo Styles. Towards the 1900s and 2000s, the ‘fallen woman’ sub-genre became more complex as instead of just having a rich woman who gains agency and falls into tragedy - we get a more complex story. We still have a woman either coming into riches or being above a certain social class, but then, we have a number of turns: familial tragedy, love stories, backdrops of war and sometimes the woman fell from grace before the plot line began and now, she is attempting to redeem herself. It certainly comes into the modern and post-modern eras with style and poise.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 4 days ago
    The Best Performances: Margot Robbie

    The Best Performances: Margot Robbie

    Margot Robbie, I feel, is an often underrated actress. Her range is incredible and her ability to portray characters with a thorough often romantic nature is her forte. As she turns thirty, Margot Robbie already has quite a lot under her belt, being nominated for an Academy Award for her role in "I, Tonya" (2017) which I felt she wholeheartedly deserved but unfortunately didn't win. However, Robbie has also been known to portray comic book characters with Harley Quinn becoming a cultural phenomenon pretty quickly. Margot Robbie has not only proved that she is more than just a pretty face, she is also quick-witted, intelligent and often very down-to-earth, humble and confident in her nature - arriving at interviews with the prime focus of keeping interest on her growing career.