addiction

The realities of addition; the truth about living under, above and beyond the influence of drugs and alcohol.

  • Daniel Wittler
    Published about 23 hours ago
    Finding Support in Early Recovery from Drugs and Alcohol

    Finding Support in Early Recovery from Drugs and Alcohol

    I spent about 5 solid years of trying to get sober and completely failing. There are a multitude of reasons, in recovery from drugs and alcohol, why people come up short. I like to tell people that you get in what you put out in this deal, it wasn't until I put my heart and soul into getting sober that I was finally able to create a brand new life, I sit here today almost 5 years sober. I want to talk about what I believe to be the most important component for me getting sober. Human connection. That is what got me to where I am today if I had to simplify it. There are several ways to find support for your recovery and I can't stress enough how vital it is that you take advantage of each form of support.
  • Ulises Acosta
    Published a day ago
    The Junkie

    The Junkie

    Watching the needle penetrate his skin and the fluid turn the syringe from half full to half empty, he felt his pain slip away; almost instantly, he could feel everything. Not just his emotions but virtually everything. He could feel the texture of his rippled clothes, the fluff of his hair, the wide gaping holes in his shoes, the fuzz in his socks, the worn out bracelet choking his wrist, his dirt stained fingers, and even his blood. Within the walls of his veins he could feel the warm substance mixing in with his blood cells and becoming very comfortable. Maybe too comfortable. A distant relative who lives on your couch, eats your food, and only pays part of the rent once every two months. Comfortable.
  • Gabriela Rosales
    Published 3 days ago
    When You Are a Food Addict, Everyone Is a Dealer
  • Cindy Gust
    Published 3 days ago
    They Didn’t Lie About Methamphetamine, but I Did. To Myself.

    They Didn’t Lie About Methamphetamine, but I Did. To Myself.

    I’m going to talk frankly about my addiction to methamphetamine, which is something I don’t often talk about. But I feel there is so much that a person needs to know with the abuse of methamphetamine. The only thing is, throw bipolar disorder on top of it and your whole world as you know it becomes Alice in Wonderland, Peter Pan in Neverland or Frosty locked in the green house. Your world as you know it disappears at the blink of an eye and you are completely clueless.
  • Cindy Gust
    Published 3 days ago
    The Broken Link

    The Broken Link

    I should be about written out by now. I finished the book I had been working on for several months and finally got it published in Ebook form today. The hard copy is going to be awhile. I’m taking a needed vacation. Then I’m going to write a revision for the hard copy.
  • David Wyld
    Published 4 days ago
    9 Holiday Party Survival Tips If You or Your Guests Are in Recovery

    9 Holiday Party Survival Tips If You or Your Guests Are in Recovery

    Helpful Hints on How to Have a Recovery-friendly Party This Holiday Season.
  • Brittany-Amber Burton
    Published 6 days ago
    My Recovery Journey

    My Recovery Journey

    Hey guys, let me introduce myself. My name is Brittany-Amber, some call me Bamber; and I am in long term recovery from IV drug use. I am 10 months sober and recovered. I was in active addiction for nearly a decade, and the father of my children and I used to both be in active addiction for close to 5 years together. In that addiction, I got pregnant with my son Jax (although I was clean during this pregnancy) born 2015, my daughter Nola born 2017, and my brand new son Kylo born in September of this year, 2019. We’ve both tried sobriety and recovery before they were conceived in 2014, but it did not stick. I finally began my real journey towards recovery from active pain pill, IV use of heroin, and IV use of methamphetamine addiction. The father and I were both on all of these together. I went for recovery, with a relapse in between, and back to recovery, although he never stopped. Since I went to my first rehab in Georgia in June 2018 (Dalton, my children, my parents, and I all are from Tennessee), I have signed guardianship to my parents of my two children Jax and Nola (to live with them in TN until I get back on my feet and enough to move back home and take them back). In September 2018 (on my daughters first birthday) I not only relapsed, but I used a needle for the first time with a guy I met in rehab, and was high by the time I sang "Happy Birthday" to my daughter over Facebook video messenger that evening. I was so torn up about having to sing "Happy Birthday" to her on the phone in another state because I had screwed my own life up that I used that day and let that be my justification instead of my strength. After that day I continued my relapse and even moved back to Tennessee to be with Dalton in active addiction and stayed there with him at his mother's house until February of this year. On February of this year, my parents picked me up to go to rehab again to finally get my kids back since I ended up missing Christmas and was starting to severely worry my parents. When they picked me up, I hugged Dalton and said goodbye, and was escorted out to the ambulance by the cops who were called because I was so violent when it came time to leave for rehab. I ended up staying with my parents for five days in their camper to detox on my own. I couldn’t blame them for having me detox cold turkey because of all the times I detoxed using a facility before did not work and I know I wasn’t covered by medical insurance and it would’ve cost too much. I knew I had to do it. Once almost over withdrawals, my parents took me to a 14 month program called Adult and Teen Challenge in Tennessee where I had already been accepted. I arrived, and started my moving in process, was searched and drug tested, only to find out I was pregnant and would no longer be accepted. That very day I was sent straight to Missouri Teen Challenge. I did leave, but only to go to a program closer to my children back in Georgia. I am now almost 10 months clean and sober, have a healthy 2 month old baby boy, and am working my recovery program everyday. I recently graduated from my program in Georgia, and plan to move back home to Tennessee with my new son Kylo and my boyfriend, whom is also in long term recovery, by the beginning of 2020. However, their father is still using and is in and out of jail. We are are not together anymore and I’ve tried my hardest, many times, to get him to go to rehab and find the happiness and peace with himself that I have found. So basically, I know I’m far from perfect, but if my story can help even just one soul, it was all worth it. I want to offer my experiences, strengths and hopes to anyone who reaches out to me according to the twelve step program and twelve traditions through sharing different steps of my journey. Thank you!
  • megan espinosa
    Published 7 days ago
    The Day I Died

    The Day I Died

    The day I died was April 3rd, 2018. It was like any other day. I got up, went to work, got some pizza with my husband, ran some errands, and then went home. Except it wasn't like any other day. This was the day I died and the day I realized I wasn't as scared of death as I thought I was.
  • Elizabet Deg
    Published 9 days ago
    Serious Mental Disorder as Earning Tool - Who Benefits from Gambling Addiction?

    Serious Mental Disorder as Earning Tool - Who Benefits from Gambling Addiction?

    That is because of their illness, or is it a specially built system that exploits people with this disease? Let's discuss it.
  • Mayurie
    Published 13 days ago
    The Diary of a BindiBabe—Series 2: Part 2

    The Diary of a BindiBabe—Series 2: Part 2

    I was 10% reluctant to hand it over straight away, and gave 90% in action: slowly but surely passing over what was a very sleek and shiny reminder of my life before September 2017, over to the dressing room attendant. It wasn’t the pair of Christian Louboutin peep-toe heels or the Mink DKNY fur hanging, coincidentally hanging in front of me on my clothes rail. And despite the disparity between each item that hung freely in front of me in my bedroom on this Summer evening, these only two luxury items left, that I owned currently, because I had finally reached the realisation that I had terrible troubles with money and my spending habits (which to my positive outlook, brought many interesting stories) had spiralled me into DEBT. A four letter word I did not love.
  • Niti Sharma
    Published 14 days ago
    Role of School, Parents and Society to Overcome Substance Abuse

    Role of School, Parents and Society to Overcome Substance Abuse

    “Addiction destroys lives, tears apart families and harms society.”
  • Kailey Fitzgerald
    Published 20 days ago
    7 Things Recovering Addicts Wish You Wouldn’t Say

    7 Things Recovering Addicts Wish You Wouldn’t Say

    Most of us have an addict or alcoholic in our lives that we love dearly and want nothing more than to provide them with the help they need. So why do we say the things we do? The language we use when we refer to addicts and the things we say directly to them can greatly impact their self-worth and even their hope of recovering. Sometimes we may be unintentionally contributing to the stigma that keeps our loved ones sick through the words we say.