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Abu symbel temple Egypt

The larger of the two  tabernacles,  frequently appertained to as the Great Temple, is  devoted to Ramesses II himself. The facade is adorned with four colossal statues of the caesar, each standing about 20  measures( 66  bases) high. These statues are seated on thrones and depict Ramesses in a calm, serene posture, embodying his  godly nature and authority. Between the legs of these  jumbos are  lower statues representing members of his family, including his  principal  woman

By vinoth kumarPublished 2 months ago 4 min read

The Abu Simbel  tabernacles in Egypt are among the most  emotional monuments of the ancient world. Sculpted into the mountainside during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II in the 13th century BCE, these  tabernacles serve not only as a testament to the architectural and engineering prowess of ancient Egypt but also as symbols of the caesar's  godly power and his achievements. Located in Nubia, near the  ultramodern border with Sudan, the Abu Simbel  tabernacles have a fascinating history that spans from their  original construction to their  ultramodern- day relocation to save them from the rising waters of Lake Nasser.  

literal environment and Construction   Ramesses II,  frequently regarded as one of Egypt's  topmost  dictators, ruled from 1279 to 1213 BCE. His reign is noted for its military  juggernauts,  expansive  structure  systems, and the establishment of Egypt as a major power in the ancient world. The construction of the Abu Simbel  tabernacles began around 1264 BCE and took  roughly 20 times to complete. These  tabernacles were  devoted to the gods Amun, Ra- Horakhty, and Ptah, as well as to Ramesses himself. The choice of  position was strategic, as it lay on the southern border of Egypt, serving both as a  important symbol of Egyptian dominance over Nubia and as a warning to implicit  raiders.

   The larger of the two  tabernacles,  frequently appertained to as the Great Temple, is  devoted to Ramesses II himself. The facade is adorned with four colossal statues of the caesar, each standing about 20  measures( 66  bases) high. These statues are seated on thrones and depict Ramesses in a calm, serene posture, embodying his  godly nature and authority. Between the legs of these  jumbos are  lower statues representing members of his family, including his  principal  woman

            , Nefertari, and some of his children.   The innards of the Great Temple is inversely  emotional. The hypostyle hall, supported by massive pillars shaped like Ramesses, leads to a series of chambers  climaxing in the sanctuary. In the sanctuary, statues of Ramesses and the three gods to whom the  tabernacle is  devoted sit side by side. The alignment of the  tabernacle is  similar that, on two specific days of the time, the sun's  shafts access the  tabernacle to illuminate these statues. This solar  miracle occurs on February 22 and October 22, dates believed to correspond to the caesar's birthday and coronation, independently.   conterminous to the Great Temple is the  lower  tabernacle  devoted to Nefertari, Ramesses'  principal  woman

            . This  tabernacle is  devoted to the goddess Hathor and Nefertari herself, a rare honor reflecting her significant status. The facade features six statues, four of Ramesses and two of Nefertari, all standing about 10  measures( 33  bases) high. The interior is  also adorned with elaborate busts and  oils depicting the queen and the goddess Hathor.   Relocation and Preservation   The  ultramodern history of the Abu Simbel  tabernacles is as fascinating as their ancient  history. In the 1960s, the construction of the Aswan High Dam posed a significant  trouble to these monuments.

The creation of Lake Nasser, a massive artificial  force, meant that the  tabernacles would be submerged under water. Feting the  literal and artistic significance of these  tabernacles, an  transnational  crusade led by UNESCO was launched to save them.   From 1964 to 1968, an ambitious and  unknown engineering  design took place. The  tabernacles were precisely cut into large blocks,  importing up to 30 tons each, and  also reassembled on advanced ground, about 65  measures( 213  bases) above their original  position and 200  measures( 656  bases) down from the swash.

This relocation  design not only  saved the  tabernacles but also assured that the solar alignment  miracle was maintained. The success of this  design is  frequently cited as one of the  topmost achievements in the field of archaeological conservation.   Significance and heritage   The Abu Simbel  tabernacles aren't only architectural masterpieces but also hold deep artistic and  literal significance. They emblematize the  majesty of Ramesses II's reign and his devotion to the gods.

The  tabernacles also reflect the ancient Egyptians' advanced understanding of art, armature, and astronomy.   also, the relocation of the Abu Simbel  tabernacles stands as a remarkable  illustration of  transnational cooperation in the field of heritage preservation. It set a precedent for  unborn  sweats to save exposed monuments around the world and  stressed the  significance of conserving artistic heritage for  unborn generations.   moment, Abu Simbel remains one of Egypt's top  sightseer  lodestones , drawing callers from  each over the world. The admiration- inspiring scale of the  tabernacles, combined with their rich history and the story of their deliverance, continues to allure and inspire people. As a UNESCO World Heritage  point, Abu Simbel is  defended and celebrated as a symbol of  mortal achievement and adaptability,  icing that its  heritage endures for generations to come. 

  In conclusion, the Abu Simbel  tabernacles are a testament to the  imagination and cultural excellence of ancient Egypt, as well as a  important  memorial of the  significance of conserving our global heritage. From their construction under Ramesses II to their relocation in the 20th century, these  tabernacles  synopsize a rich history that continues to  reverberate with people around the world.

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