review

Reviews of the top geek movies, tv, and books in the industry.

  • Marielle Sabbag
    Published 8 days ago
    'Christmas in the Clouds' - A Movie Review

    'Christmas in the Clouds' - A Movie Review

    Wait, let me get this straight. You’re telling me that’s not the critic for the hotel? Oh no, I’m in trouble.
  • Fanpicked Media
    Published 8 days ago
    Luck of the Irish

    Luck of the Irish

    It’s been roughly a month since the Streaming Wars have picked up steam with the release of Disney Plus. In my last review, I said Netflix still has a few aces up its sleeve, with the instant classic that was Klaus, which I still claim is a must see for this and every upcoming holiday season until the end of time. But behind the scenes, one man has fired shots at Disney, or at least one brand under the House of Mouse. That man is none other than Martin Scorsese. Recently, the filmmaker has belittled the Marvel Cinematic Universe every chance he can, claiming the movies aren’t “real cinema”, that it’s a minor miracle that the actors are able to give good performances with the lackluster material they have to work with, and that each installment is more of an “amusement park ride” than a film. It’s nothing we haven’t heard before, what with the countless movie reviews and think piece articles that are always claiming that “superhero fatigue” is coming any day now, only for the latest three Marvel movies to gross a billion dollars or more each. Mister Scorsese has every right to his opinion, however, it is humorous that he claims that the MCU is what is ruining cinema, when many critics say the same about the outlet that is hosting his latest film, Netflix, the scourge of the movie and television industry, according to Scorsese's friend, Steven Spielberg. This is Netflix’s biggest original film since Bright, a movie that had me puzzled at the time if it was a sign that Netflix had made it big as a studio because they got Will Smith, or if Will Smith had truly fallen as a star that he’s doing a movie for Netflix. But is this new movie any good though? Let’s find out.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 8 days ago
    Review of 'His Dark Materials' 1.5

    Review of 'His Dark Materials' 1.5

    His Dark Materials 1.5 on HBO earlier tonight upped the evil of the villains, making them, well, the equivalent of Nazis.
  • Arvind Pennathur
    Published 9 days ago
    'Frozen II': A Frosty Sequel

    'Frozen II': A Frosty Sequel

    When I first heard that Disney had plans to make a sequel to Frozen, I was partially excited, but mostly kind of indifferent. It’s not like the first movie left us on a note that necessitated a sequel, but at the same time, I knew that a sequel presented a chance for a brand new world to be properly fleshed out, and the possibility of that intrigued me. Disney movies are exceedingly good at building entire universes, and they usually know how to present them to us in doses that are just right. Bearing this in mind, I walked into Frozen II having only watched the initial trailer that they released, and based on that, I was ready for a darker adventure that explored both the characters of Anna and Elsa as well as their relationship as sisters.
  • Marielle Sabbag
    Published 9 days ago
    'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' (2000) - A Movie Review

    'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' (2000) - A Movie Review

    Make sure that the Grinch doesn’t steal any of your Christmas decorations this season. He’s a mean one!
  • James F. Ewart
    Published 9 days ago
    James Reviews: 'Captain Marvel'

    James Reviews: 'Captain Marvel'

    If one wants to know how many new superheroes the Marvel Cinematic Universe will introduce, one only has to look at the library of characters Marvel Comics has created. With the recent merging of 20th Century Fox into Disney, it's only a matter of time before the X-Men and the Fantastic Four start showing up. Kevin Feige has also made it clear that the future of the franchise is in space, so what better way to introduce the final frontier with the first hero who can get across the universe and back; Carol Danvers, aka Captain Marvel. Despite initial reports, the "controversy" that arose wasn't as black and white as it seemed. Many fans were hoping that Black Widow would be the first female hero to get her solo film, and some found it difficult to separate Brie Larson's political views from the character she was portraying. That aside, this new hero's first solo outing did have potential, but it does wind up being one of the MCU's more forgettable movies.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 9 days ago
    Review of 'His Dark Materials' 1.4

    Review of 'His Dark Materials' 1.4

    The bears took center state in episode 1.4 of His Dark Materials last week. If this is starting to sound like a three-ring circus, that's because it is, but the menagerie in His Dark Materials is far more diverse and intriguing than any you'll find in any circus, or, for that matter, to use another place where the Bears appear, in any football game.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 9 days ago
    Review of 'Watchmen' 1.6-1.7

    Review of 'Watchmen' 1.6-1.7

    I thought I'd review episodes 1.6 and 1.7 of Watchmen together, since they're both episodes of Nostalgia — the powerful drug that makes Angela relive her family's memories — and I thought two episodes might make a little more sense than the one. Which they do. I think. (Again, with the proviso that I never read the comics or saw any movie, and knew nothing at all of Watchmen before I started watching the HBO series.)
  • Q-ell Betton
    Published 10 days ago
    'The Irishman'

    'The Irishman'

    Martín Scorsese’s latest offering to cinema is the three and a half hour epic gangster’s story, The Irishman. Few can tell a gangster, or more specifically, Mafiosa story, better than or even as well as Scorsese.
  • Sammi Curran
    Published 10 days ago
    'My Hero Academia': Season 4 Episode 7 Review

    'My Hero Academia': Season 4 Episode 7 Review

    Welcome to my weekly My Hero Academia reviews! I’ve been a fan of this show for about a year, and this is the first time I’m actually watching the shows as they air. I should also mention I watch it with my three other roommates, so I have tons of theories and fun commentary to share about the show. Also worth mentioning, I’m approaching this from a show-only perspective, so I haven’t read the manga and have no idea what’s coming. So better late than never, and I’m going to be writing weekly recap/reviews for this new season. So far, the season has been amazing, and with Overhaul continuing to cause tensions with his Quirk-erasing master plan, this week continues to build the suspense to a ridiculous high.
  • Anthony's Film Review
    Published 10 days ago
    Anthony's Film Review - 'Knives Out' (2019)

    Anthony's Film Review - 'Knives Out' (2019)

    It is easy to assume at first that Knives Out is a standard murder mystery because of the familiar plot premise. You have a rich old man who is found dead, and the multiple individuals who are close to the victim are potential murder suspects. Specifically, the victim is Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer), a wealthy author of mystery novels. His family includes the daughter Linda (Jamie Lee Curtis) with her husband Richard (Don Johnson), Walt Thrombey (Michael Shannon), Donna Thrombey (Riki Lindhome), Joni Thrombey (Toni Collette), grandson Jacob (Jaeden Martell), granddaughter Meg (Katherine Langford), and the black sheep of the family named Ransom (Chris Evans). There is also the servant Fran (Edi Patterson) and the nurse Marta (Ana de Armas). If you think about it, this cast is essentially a 21st-century version of characters in a murder mystery from the Victorian era.
  • Trevor Wells
    Published 10 days ago
    Lifetime Review: 'My Father, My Kidnapper'

    Lifetime Review: 'My Father, My Kidnapper'

    Hairstylist Lena Winters (Erin Karpluk) and her college student daughter Casey (Larissa Dias) have worked hard to move forward with their lives and put their dark past behind them. Twenty years prior, Lena and Casey escaped the clutches of Casey's father, serial killer/kidnapper Timothy Fast (Brent Stait), who had been holding Lena prisoner for years. Even with Timothy in prison, both mother and daughter find themselves with lingering trauma from the experience.