collection
DC Universe

DC Universe

Welcome to the digital DC Universe.

  • Clark-Joseph Kent
    Published 8 months ago
    The Superhero, Part of a Global National Strategy

    The Superhero, Part of a Global National Strategy

    Superman appeared in the pages of "Action Comics #1" in 1938 spearheading a literary genre that would grab the hearts of millions for generations to come. The superhero genre was in a sense, an affirmation at first of America's immigrant spirit as Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster exemplified in their Jewish immigrant fight for notoriety and novelty attempting for five years to get their character published in a major newspaper as a comic strip. The authors of the famed character read pulp science-fiction and adventure magazines which were a major influence on their creation of the character. Superman, originally conceived by the authors as a villain, created him as a hero with an alien origin in order to answer the thirst for the sensational and "sell papers." This is where the superhero genre differs from the mythology of yesteryear: the comic book functions as modern mythology whose primary purpose it is to entertain and not to teach. Science-fiction has thus the formative element in advanced cultures to entertain the audience and provide a mythology that serves the purpose of wish fulfillment and fantasy, and not the primary moral and religious nature of the Old Gods.
  • Herbert Seward III
    Published 8 months ago
    'Wild C.A.T.S': Worthy of the Silver Screen?

    'Wild C.A.T.S': Worthy of the Silver Screen?

    DC is reviving one of the dopest, most underrated comic superhero teams out there, and I want all of the smoke that comes with it. Jim Lee deciding to bring WildC.A.T.S. out of mothballs to spearhead a re-imagining of the entire WildStorm Comic Universe in a limited collection got me thinking about how the original Image iteration of the WildC.A.T.S. would translate to the big screen. A couple of things need to be clarified before we explore this fan topic any further.1) THIS cheesy representation of the comic CANNOT be the first thing in folks minds IF a movie re-make is thought about (the show opening IS pretty dope, though).
  • Rachel Carrington
    Published 8 months ago
    Farewell to a Hero's Father—A Tribute to Eddie Jones

    Farewell to a Hero's Father—A Tribute to Eddie Jones

    Jonathan Kent is an iconic role in the DC universe. The father of the young alien from Krypton, Clark Kent, played an important part in shaping the morality and humanity of the boy who would become the world's superhero. Though Eddie Jones wasn't the first actor to take on the challenge of becoming Superman's father, his portrayal of the character left a lasting impression for fans of the 1993 television series, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman.
  • Clark-Joseph Kent
    Published 8 months ago
    'Superman: For Tomorrow'

    'Superman: For Tomorrow'

    In 2004, DC Comics published a highly ambitious storyline featuring some of the best artists and writers of the DC Comics company: Jim Lee and Brian Azzarello. The storyline featured a highly grim superhero, Superman, confronted with threats of varying nature—personal, political, scientific, and messianic. In the comic book storyline, Superman is tried and put to trial for his attempt at realizing a utopia, a pocket dimension called Metropia designed for the purpose of creating a paradisiacal dimension should the project of Earth fail. Superman in this storyline titled For Tomorrow is as much a man of belief, as he is a man of science and evidence.
  • Clark-Joseph Kent
    Published 8 months ago
    Doomsday

    Doomsday

    In Justice League Unlimited, the DCAU presents Doomsday as a Superman clone. This differs from the comic version where Doomsday is actually a clone from Krypton, by scientist Bertron. In Justice League Unlimited, Doomsday is a Superman clone from STAR LABS by Emil Hamilton, Superman's foremost scientist and traitor. Doomsday, in the episode "Doomsday Sanction," is revealed to have been cloned in order to hate Superman. Geneticist scientist, Dr. Milo, frees Doomsday in order to get revenge on Amanda Waller and Emil Hamilton, only to get killed by Doomsday.
  • Clark-Joseph Kent
    Published 8 months ago
    Investigation: Brainiac-Luthor Crisis

    Investigation: Brainiac-Luthor Crisis

    This is a disclaimer on Justice League Unlimited that is not claiming to report real facts or charges of terrorism. It is an investigation on the Brainiac-Luthor crisis. The events of the Justice League Unlimited are of great importance for the super powered development that forms the perception of our current entertainment climate. It is meant for our own reflection on the priorities of the US government and of its attempts.
  • The Sessa
    Published 8 months ago
    Top 10 Best DC Animated Movies

    Top 10 Best DC Animated Movies

    DC features some of the best comic stories ever told, with iconic characters, thought provoking themes, and timeless lessons. In many instances, the live action movies fail to translate the concepts from the books on the big screen. Luckily, those classic stories are being told on the little screen. In my opinion, the DC animated movies are underrated gems that highlight why DC has been a worthy competitor to Marvel for decades.
  • Clark-Joseph Kent
    Published 8 months ago
    An Ideal of Hope

    An Ideal of Hope

    Art expresses something of the symbol of the natural world, it is an imitation of life, for it seeks to convey through symbol, audio, and visual image, a reflection, a truth, and the goodness of life itself. In contemporary life, there subsists a strained relation between the artistic expression and aesthetics—the philosophy of beauty—and it is certain that, this results from the loss of the religious sentiment of life: the contemplation of Beauty, found in the permanence of God, has ceded the place for praxis, that is, technology and a certain affection for only the consumerist production of things.
  • A.R. Minhas
    Published 8 months ago
    'Doom Patrol': The Right Kind of Weird