coping

Life presents variables; learning how to cope in order to master, minimize, or tolerate what has come to pass.

  • Carol Townend
    Published a day ago
    Coping with the Lockdown blues when you have a mental health problem

    Coping with the Lockdown blues when you have a mental health problem

    It is very quite on my street at the moment, and it has been like that for a while now. Normally I am at the beach, out in town or meeting people and helping them with mental health problems. However, like many in this Covid-19 pandemic, I am staying at home, helping to save lives. My world is upside down and my mind is pretty chaotic. Going to the supermarket is stressful because there are markers and social distancing rules. Going outside is suddenly scary again.
  • Joseph Harris
    Published 3 days ago
    Lockdown: Week 2 - Flair of Anxiety

    Lockdown: Week 2 - Flair of Anxiety

    2020 has got to be the weirdest year I've gone through. Most days this week (starting: 30th March) I've been thinking about how unbelievable this all is. It just doesn't seem possible that something like this is happening all around the world. Its starting to feel more and more like a bad dream, something this worldwide just can't be possible.
  • Winter P.
    Published 6 days ago
    It's not your fault

    It's not your fault

    At times like this, it's easy to slip away. Self isolation can be hard, it's okay. When you're depressed, you self isolate on your own, in your own way. Even in a crowded room you can feel alone, but at least there's some distraction.
  • Mohamed Maoui
    Published 7 days ago
    How I remain productive while deeply depressed

    How I remain productive while deeply depressed

    During my fight with depression, I had days where I felt that life has pretty much stopped completely. I may go a couple of weeks without showering. without eating. My apartment becomes a flipping disaster and the list goes on. Sometimes I can not manage to motivate myself to walk and fill my bottle of water to hydrate myself.
  • Maryna xx
    Published 8 days ago
     Disturbing Frustration

    Disturbing Frustration

    Every morning, she just opened her eyes and realized that a new day began, she was afraid. It’s a new day again … Go to work again, so as soon as you realize that a new day has come, you want to extend the night, lie in bed, shelter your head with a blanket and that this new day does not begin. No, she wants to work, she likes to do flowers, collect bouquets and gifts, invent new inscriptions for cozy blankets and multicolored mugs. Several times she was affected by the sickness.
  • Angie Craig
    Published 9 days ago
    Day 6 of Lockdown in the UK

    Day 6 of Lockdown in the UK

    Its day 6 of lock-down and I’m still in a state of shock, it’s hard to imagine that it was only a few weeks ago we was all getting on with our lives, I was just coming back from a course in wales, walking to the local pub to meet my daughters and planning with them our 4 day holiday in April, now everything is on hold, life has simply stopped.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 19 days ago
    On Going Partially Blind Before 25

    On Going Partially Blind Before 25

    When I was 19 years' old, I was told I had gone partially blind.
  • ASHLEY SMITH
    Published 20 days ago
    I don't fear the virus

    I don't fear the virus

    This is a very personal piece and please read it but don't take anything I say for granted without checking and choose your own precautions.
  • Liv Longue
    Published 22 days ago
    Too Much of a Good Thing...
  • Stacey Broad
    Published 24 days ago
    Sometimes it’s Ok to Not Be Ok

    Sometimes it’s Ok to Not Be Ok

    I consider myself to be a pretty strong, independent, and resilient woman. I like to accomplish things on my own and find it difficult to ask others for help. Asking someone for help was viewed as a weakness to me for most of my life. It was quite normal for me to say "I'm fine" regardless of the chaos that was occuring in my mind. It took me a long time to realize that pretending to be ok all time was making me sick. It would manifest itself into some very physical ailments due to my constant anxiety that people were going to find out that I wasn't fine at all. For many years I experienced chronic stomach pain, IBS, nausea, rashes, and eczema. I was always tired and wanted to sleep all the time. I was clinically depressed, but I truly believed that I just needed to "suck it up" and take care of my obligations. I felt a great deal of anxiety and shame because I couldn't seem to snap out of it and stop being such a downer. When you are in the midst of a depressive episode, telling yourself to "get over it" is pretty counterproductive as it just seems to pick away at your feelings of self-worth.
  • Renata Barton
    Published 24 days ago
    How COVID-19 Has Affected My Hypochondria

    How COVID-19 Has Affected My Hypochondria

    When reports about COVID-19 began to circulate in the United States, I wasn't alarmed whatsoever. There was no valid reason for me to panic. But as weeks passed, I began to worry as a result of the pandemic status. Also, the disease having made its way into the states after having been carried by individuals who were affected.
  • Jord Tury
    Published 25 days ago
    "Never Trust a Hippie"

    "Never Trust a Hippie"

    You know, it's funny. I remember way back when I was pushing sixteen and in this stupidly exaggerated bubble of false optimism. Like a hippie would think, I truly believed the world was kind-spirited and generous beyond belief. I didn't believe in lies, unfaithful partners or corrupt politicians. I thought we were all equal; beautiful and entwined. And, honestly, that's all I ever wanted to believe as I progressed through this manic life. But you know how things are; one big dramatic event can change the way you think or act. And, it's that one certain moment I speak of that managed to make me drop the flower and pick up a deep, perplexing anger that would eventually destroy me. It's that moment that made me question myself and speak only one eye-opening line.