art

A snapshot of photography as an art form; explore art museums and galleries devoted to photography, iconic photographers, the history of fine art photography and more.

  • Stephanie Caruso
    Published 7 days ago
    The Art of Teaching Art

    The Art of Teaching Art

    There are many photos that take your breath away. This happens to be one of them for me. Sometimes, it becomes impossible for a camera to see what you see. And sometimes, it becomes impossible for others to do the same. Just like a camera, we have our own lenses, our own points of view, and our own visions of what we hope others can capture by the photos we present.
  • Martha
    Published 17 days ago
    4 Ways To Find Inspiration As A Beginner Photographer

    4 Ways To Find Inspiration As A Beginner Photographer

    Photography is an art. And every artist knows that there are moments when inspiration decides to abandon them and doesn't seem to plan to come back soon. The deadlines are accumulating, the calls from clients don't stop, but the ideas just don't come to a head.
  • Elayne Griffith
    Published 29 days ago
    In our Bones, Stones, and Stars
  • Flying Ace
    Published 2 months ago
    Favorite Shots

    Favorite Shots

    So a little backstory about this shot. We were at the zoo and I really wanted to test my camera out and see if I had any potential to be a photographer, and this was one of the shots of the day. When I showed it to my father, who knows a little bit more about photography, he said you can't even see the frog but I told him thats kind of what I liked about this shot. I've always liked to capture or look at images that kind of show the mysteriousness of nature.
  • Haley Bice
    Published 2 months ago
    Power of Photography

    Power of Photography

    “No photograph ever changed anything all by itself, for photographs are highly dependent creatures and their influence is entirely contingent on words, circumstances, distribution, and belief systems “ is quoted from ‘under the influence of photography’ by Goldberg. This quote explains a lot about why the photograph ‘Dali Atomicus’ by Phillippe Halsman has a great cultural significance. It has such an importance culturally because it not only explains a lot about physics, looking inside the idea of suspension, but it also has a cultural impact because of the context behind the image and its important message. The photograph’s message seems to be that if you work hard, the product you end up with will be worth it. This image affects me personally because of the message it portrays in such a joyful way.
  • Princess Buttercup
    Published 2 months ago
    When life feels bleak...

    When life feels bleak...

    I never thought I’d see the day where life seemed bleak for the entire planet. I’ve been oscillating between moments of fear and panic, tears streaming down my cheeks, to joy and gut-splitting laughter when video chatting with family and friends.
  • Jose Soto
    Published 3 months ago
    Casting dark shadows over cultural brilliance

    Casting dark shadows over cultural brilliance

    There are approximately nine to ten miles between the El Paso Museum of History, located in downtown El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. The two binational metropolitan cities, however, are strikingly intertwined. They are not only bound together geographically, historically, and culturally, but artistically as well. Their influence on each other is literally quite apparent, especially while gallivanting through the downtown streets of either side of the border.
  • Adam Dunphy
    Published 3 months ago
    What's history got to say about it?

    What's history got to say about it?

    A picture paints a thousand words. But a photo has them all- how many words does it take to write a history of history? can it be caught in a the blink of a shutter?
  • Catherine S
    Published 3 months ago
    Sunrise Above the Earth

    Sunrise Above the Earth

    As a kid, I was always fascinated by watching the sun rise. In summer, I would often wake up before even the birds to sit by the window and watch the sun awaken a sense of wonder in me. I would sit there until the last wisp of pink was gone from the horizon. The first time I flew on a plane was when I was 6, and the second I stepped on the plane, I felt truly alive, like it was my calling to be on that plane. I loved the sensation of being far above my troubles and feeling like I could touch the sky. Whenever I flew on a plane as a kid, I always rushed to the window seat and didn’t take my eyes off the sky for a second. Since then, I have traveled to many countries and seen countless sunrises, but none can compare to the sunrise I witnessed just a week ago on a plane to Florida. I was having a bad day, since I had to wait in line for hours at then airport, and I had not slept a wink the night before. But the second I stepped on the plane and looked out the window, I felt that all was right in the world. I saw deep purples unfurling around the sun and crescendoed into magical crimsons, with clouds gracefully dancing in the sky. I was in awe, and couldn’t tear my eyes away for a single second, in the fear that I would miss something. I pulled out my phone just seconds before the plane took off and it began to rain, fat drops rolling down the windows. After about a minute after taking off, I managed to take this incredible picture of the city lights beneath a majestic sunrise. It represents how the earth might seem quiet from below, but up above, there is a sort of magic displayed that is different than anything else on this world. I took dozens, if not hundreds of pictures in the small window of time that it took for the sunrise to turn into a brilliantly blue sky without a cloud in sight, but this one was the only one that truly made me think “wow”. The rain stopped, and I looked over my pictures. I came across this one, and I could not stop looking at it. It was so perfect, I did nothing to change it at all. I didn’t even edit it at all, despite the faint reflection of my phone in the window. The reflection shows how such a beautiful moment can always be captured with just a camera. It showed the magic of the sunrise combined with the gracefulness of flying. After looking through all of the photos stored on my phone (nearly 14,000 of them!), it was a no-brainer to go with this picture since it holds such a dear place in my heart. I have taken many photos in my life, and my obsession with photography started when I was just a toddler, but this is definitely my favorite and most cherished photograph. I have since tried to take pictures that compare to that work of art, but they fall short of the splendor that is displayed there. Hopefully my picture can help inspire young photographers to always have faith in their abilities and that a good picture is always where you least expect it. I hope that my picture is able to awaken the curiosity and playfulness that lives in every person, young or old. Thank you for taking my picture into consideration, and I apologize for any potential typos, as I am writing this on a cell phone (the same one that I took the picture on!).
  • Talya Jacobson
    Published 3 months ago
    Life is a Party

    Life is a Party

    “What I like about photographs is that they capture a moment that’s gone forever, impossible to reproduce.” – Karl Lagerfeld
  • Patrick Roberts
    Published 3 months ago
    Historic Beauty

    Historic Beauty

    As I walked through the pale white double doors leading to this beautiful dome, I couldn't help but feel a sense of pride and joy as I gazed up at this historic monument that I was witnessing before me. I struggled to take in all the wonderful beauty that was unfolding before my eyes. At first I wasn't sure how to capture this iconic ceiling. I walked around the perimeter of the room and just marveled at all the glorious beauty that was around me. Granite tile polished to a high gloss, illuminated each historic step. In the East wing, there were many depictions of impressionist artwork. Monet, Manet, Rockwell and Degas all lined the walls of the wing. Thin brush strokes combined with life like portraits lined the hall, each more beautiful and breath taking than the last. To the West was the hall of the more surrealist painters. Picasso, Dali, and Magritte all found a place here. As I gazed at each unique shape and misaligned figure, I began to realize that these were all great works of art and each worthy of appreciation but this still was not exactly what I was looking for on this very day. I took a stroll to the North wing which lead me to the more modern art section of the museum. Warhol, Lautrec, Munich and Metzinger all could be found here. For me it was a very interesting depiction of exactly what modern art meant for each generation. For earlier works of art, cubism and surrealism definitely played a part in framing exactly what the works of art would look like. After this I veered into the main hallway and had a look up at the incredible domed ceiling that was some 30 feet above my head. This is where I spent the rest of my time that afternoon. I went with a "panoramic" approach but that wasn't giving me the desired effect that I was after. I kind of gave up on the perfect shot for a little while instead focusing on the wonderful landmark that was right in front of my eyes. I stopped to wonder at everything that was around me, the history, the beauty, the incredible attention to detail and I was completely moved. My attention then wandered to the fact that many incredible historical figures stood right where I was standing and gazed up at this remarkable ceiling just as I am doing now. A certain feeling of solidarity came over me and I began to realize that we are all connected in this world, none of us are the same but we are all together in this incredible world and I then realized that I was such a part of something greater than myself, a part of something greater than I could ever imagine! I took a step back and surveyed the shot and looked long and hard at the ceiling. It was at this point that I decided to really get a good set shot, I tried the action shot with my camera but that didn't elicit the desired result for me. I fumbled through the settings once again to try portrait setting but that seemed to not give a true color to the shot. I finally settled on the pro setting and adjusted the color temperature down a little bit and adjusted the shutter speed slightly higher as it was a very well lit room with combination natural light and artificial LED lighting. The result is what you see here, this glorious shot of that magnificent ceiling with untold souls who stood, walked and admired the ceiling just as I had on this very day. I will never forget my visit to the Smithsonian museum of art in Washington D.C. The ceiling and setting were simply breathtaking and I am forever grateful that I took a trip there.
  • JB Barger
    Published 3 months ago
    "Mother Road" Memories

    "Mother Road" Memories

    Heading West on a desolate stretch of aging Arizona asphalt, the famed Route 66 Museum known as Cool Spring's Station offers some unique sights and sounds for those who venture a visit, especially during the "golden hour", with this vintage American classic pickup standing proud against the brilliant kaleidoscope of colors from the Sun setting over the mountains in the background.