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Why You're Not Broken

You've been told that you're broken a thousand times... I think we should challenge that thought.

By Amanda DoylePublished 2 years ago 3 min read
Photo by Raimond Klavins on Unsplash.com

When you were a child and you broke a toy, what happened?

Your first instinct would be to try and fix it. And if it can't be fixed, it is discarded. Broken is no good. Broken things should go in the garbage. There's no use for broken.

A lot of time, we'll even replace the broken toy with something else. Something new and better. Something that (hopefully) won't break as easily.

What happens if we become broken?

Again, your first instinct is to try and fix it. Try and fix the problem that exists within you, the thing that is fundamentally wrong about you.

But what if we can't fix it? Does that mean that we should be discarded? Technically, we are broken, right?

I don't like the word broken because it implies that something needs to be fixed, or corrected.

Someone close to me said that she doesn't like to post on social media about being broken, because people only want to see the good. And I have to disagree with that. I think the right people want to see ALL OF IT. The right people will want to see the good parts, the amazing parts, the okay parts, the shitty parts, and yes, even the parts where you may think you're broken.

But I don't think you're broken at all. I think that you're whole. You're a stained glass window, and each time you get another crack in you, it's just another space for light to come through.

There are going to be times where you feel like you're broken.

But I need you to remember that you don't have to fix any part of yourself unless you feel like it is an issue.

Self-improvement is crucial for living a healthy and fulfilling life, but we all have an intuitive side, and we're all able to recognize when something is right for us, versus when something is being pushed on us.

There may be people in life who tell you that they will never want to be with you because you're too broken.

There may be people in life who tell you that you can never be fixed.

I dare you to look them right in the eye. I dare you to tell them that you're not broken, that no one is broken, because we were formed and put on this planet to make mistakes! We are really just meeting our purpose.

I dare you to tell them that the cracks allow for more light to shine through. I dare you to shine in their face, and show them that there's no place for the word broken in your life.

When something breaks, we want to fix it.

We never think about the fact that the breaking could be happening for a reason.

We never think about the fact that we're about to have a fresh start, or that we're about to dodge a bullet, or that we're about to find a new opportunity.

When someone breaks you down, try to see it for what it really is - it's a chance for you to show how you're going to get back up, how you're going to adapt to this change in your life, how you're going to incorporate this new experience into your personality.

This is your chance to start over and do whatever you want now, with no rules and restrictions. When we feel broken, we often forget that a lot of the time, we have just been set free by something that was no longer good for us.

The good may fall faster than dominoes, but the bad stay down while we rise.

self help

About the Creator

Amanda Doyle

Currently in my "figuring it the hell out" era.

Big believer in everything happening for a reason, second chances, and the fact that we're living in a simulation.

Check out my podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/semimindfulbanter

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    Amanda DoyleWritten by Amanda Doyle

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