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Using Thanksgiving Sales

To Your Prepping Advantage

By M.L. LewisPublished 6 months ago 3 min read
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Happy Thanksgiving! Abraham Lincoln made this an official holiday for the third Thursday in November in 1863. The holiday is based around the pilgrims in 1621 when they celebrated their first harvest with the help of their Native American neighbors, the Pequot Tribe. Today, nearly 90% of Americans will celebrate this holiday, making it the second most popular holiday in the country. With only 2% of people eating out, there is a good chance that the majority of those celebrating will be staying at home. Here’s how you can turn the holiday sales into your prepping advantage.

Fall Decor

Thanksgiving Day decorations may look pretty, but they can be handy in a disaster. Garland makes a good rope substitute. Wreaths can be used to label doors during the aftermath of a disaster. Air freshener sprays can make a stuffy room more comfortable. Fake fall leaves can help you secretly mark your trail for your team to find you. Same with artificial flowers. Battery power tea lights provide good temporary lighting in a blackout. Hale bales can make good tinder. The cornucopia, the hallmark decoration of Thanksgiving, can be used as it was intended to hold berries and grain in.

The Food

The cornerstone of the holiday is the signature turkey/ham dinner. 42% say this is their favorite part of the holiday. Box meals like Stovetop and instant potatoes are going to be highly sought after, and likely to be on sale. Canned goods can be bought in bulk cheaper than any other time of the year. Mixes, sugar, flour, and seasonings are available to add flavor to your pantry. Beverages like soda-pop and drink mixes will be discounted because of the parties. Produce can be dried, canned, or turned into jelly. Soups and broths are great for your preps to warm your heart when things get stressful.

Cooking

A lot of items used in the kitchen can help you out in a disaster. Disposable turkey pans can be a good water catcher/treatment pot. Outdoor cooking devices are discounted like turkey fryers. Baggies of various sizes are good at waterproofing tools and paperwork that can be destroyed in wet conditions. Foil is a versatile tool. It can be shaped into anything you need, like a bowl. People are going to want to bring home leftovers so a lot of tupperware is needed. These make for great seedling carriers. For more on kitchen tool survival, visit https://vocal.media/lifehack/the-doomsday-kitchen.

Having Fun

Cooking a Thanksgiving Day meal takes time to prepare, so you’ll most likely have to wait a long time for it. Sports, like football, are a great way to kill time whether you are watching the games or playing a pickup one of your own. Turkey feathers and berry ink are a good idea to write down what you are thankful for and can double as a valuable skill in a doomsday situation. Update your family photos in your bugout bag by taking a lot at the family gathering. Make sand art with empty, clean jars and colored sand. Sand is also good at smothering fires.

Cleaning Up

This is the worst part of Thanksgiving. Nobody wants to do it, but it needs to be done. So, these items will be on sale just like the food. People will throw away 25% more waste than any other holiday today. Food scraps can be put in the compost bin. Dish liquid is good for treating fleas on pets. Disasters bring a lot of mess, so it’ll be smart to stock up on cleaning spray, trash bags, and paper towels. Disinfectant wipes are proven to fight against pandemics. Disposable plates and plastic utensils allow you to eat well-balanced meals without wasting valuable water to wash them.

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About the Creator

M.L. Lewis

Welcome to my little slice of pie. This blog will primarily focus on prepping and homesteading skills with a sprinkle of fiction every now and then.

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