capital punishment

Weigh the pros, cons and controversies surrounding the grave issue of capital punishment; should the death penalty be allowed?

  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 20 days ago
    Reason First: William Kemmler’s Electric Ride

    Reason First: William Kemmler’s Electric Ride

    A hatchet sliced into Tillie Ziegler on March 29, 1889. The man holding the bloody murder weapon stood as William Kemmler. A jury found him guilty. A sentence stated that he should be put to death. As an uneducated swindler, Kemmler held onto bits and pieces of rage. For his crime, he would see that fury silenced as the first man to die from the electric chair.
  • Ahmad Issa
    Published 2 months ago
          Death Row

    Death Row

    My name is Ahmad Issa, and this is my true story about me and the justice system in the United States of America.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 2 months ago
    Reason First: Bring back the Total Death Penalty in Delaware

    Reason First: Bring back the Total Death Penalty in Delaware

    A gurney with a body rolls into the forensics laboratory. It has only expired a few minutes ago. It is the corpse of a monster. A male convicted of multiple counts of rape perished behind prison walls. Good riddance. The evil man had died at the James T. Vaughn Correctional Center in Smyrna, Delaware. He succumbed due to his cancer. For the rapes, the state sentenced him to life in prison with an additional twenty years. Fortunately, science silenced this brute. It’s only right that he should die behind bars rather than reach a parole date which would have been extremely difficult with his sentence.
  • Lauryl Sandman
    Published 2 months ago
    Unpopular Opinion:The Death Penalty Needs to be Suspended

    Unpopular Opinion:The Death Penalty Needs to be Suspended

    What began as a public event soon became more private as executions were moved from outdoor gathering spaces to within prison walls. The death penalty has been in use in the United States since the mid-1600s. Early criminals were often put to death in front of jeering crowds who celebrated the act of execution. But the morbid desire to see people being killed was not diminished once executions were removed from public spaces. Crowds of people still clamored to gain entry to the exclusive events. The more publicized the crime, the more well-attended the execution.
  • Daniel da Chao Samico
    Published 5 months ago
    DEATH PENALTY, MY LAW.

    DEATH PENALTY, MY LAW.

    First of all lets make clear that these are my views and only mine, also I warn that they require the correct attention and understanding otherwise I may come across as some kind of self-appointed king.
  • Edward Anderson
    Published 9 months ago
    Delayed Death No More in Texas

    Delayed Death No More in Texas

    "Lord forgive them. They don't know what they are doing," those are the last words of convicted murderer Larry Swearingen. In July of 2000, a jury found Swearingen guilty of raping and murdering 19-year-old Melissa Trott. Crimes he adamantly denied committing, despite the "mountain of evidence" against him.
  • Mia O'Sullivan
    Published 11 months ago
    Richard Chase: The Vampire of Sacramento

    Richard Chase: The Vampire of Sacramento

    Note: This story contains accounts of murder, necrophilia, and cannibalism, each as disturbing and gory as the other.
  • Joseline Burns
    Published about a year ago
    Criminals & Society

    Criminals & Society

    Historically, society has attempted to discourage crime by making the punishment so horrible that nobody would want to take the risk of committing a crime. In an age where people aren’t afraid of death what can be done to scare them? What can we do in America where inmates consider lumpy potatoes to be "cruel and unusual punishment?"
  • WatchMojo
    Published about a year ago
    Top 10 Executed Criminals' Last Words

    Top 10 Executed Criminals' Last Words

    Any last words? Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the "Top 10 Executed Criminals’ Last Words."
  • Medea Walker
    Published 2 years ago
    Waiting to Die

    Waiting to Die

    Dear Love,
  • Devin Louise
    Published 2 years ago
    Why the Death Penalty Is 100% Justified, Forty-Nine Years After One of the Most Infamous Acts of Domestic Terrorism
  • Robyn Welborne
    Published 2 years ago
    Make It Efficient, Practical, and Humane (**Essay**)

    Make It Efficient, Practical, and Humane (**Essay**)

    It was scheduled that inmate Ricky Gray is expected to be executed on March 16, 2016. But, what would happen to his conviction if the lethal injection was no longer an option? The theory of the electric chair is an open discussion, but some Congressmen will argue that it is in violation of the Constitution for being deemed a cruel and unusual of punishment. How can that be when even some of the most well-known states (such as, Arizona, California, and Oklahoma) still legalize demeaning gas chambers? The State of Virginia challenges that notion by proposing a death row bill that will promote the opportunity to explore other choices on how to bring justice when the court system convicts a person to die. The state is trying to get previous techniques re-approved for death row inmates in response to the now crisis of the insufficient stock of deadly chemicals. If the bill provides too much of a controversy, then the Virginian Correctional Facilities will be forced to look for alternative sedatives in order to create a completely new lethal drug formula. One problem still remains as a prominent factor with the passing of this bill is that humanity as a whole does not entirely agree with the Capital Punishment Law. The people would rather see the law be terminated permanently. Even though it may not be the most humane method, the State of Virginia proposes that electrocution can be more efficient and practical than the reliability of obtaining the drugs used for lethal injections.