Latest in Criminal

  • Charles Leon
    Published about 12 hours ago
    Broken Windows Theory

    Broken Windows Theory

    In the 1980s crime in New York City had reached almost epidemic proportions. Apparently, New York was suffering by increased immigration and as a result a much younger population and, added to that, New Yorkers were hit hard by welfare cuts. It wasn’t safe to travel the subway and you would be advised not to go to certain areas, particularly after dark. Yet, by the end of the 1990s the city had cleaned up its act and saw a dramatic fall in the rate of crime.
  • Wade Wainio
    Published a day ago
    Norman Mailer, Jack Henry Abbott and the Pesky Beast Belly

    Norman Mailer, Jack Henry Abbott and the Pesky Beast Belly

    In addition to being a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Norman Mailer was an attempted murderer who used a a penknife to stab his wife, Adele Morales, in 1960. This resulted in him being involuntarily committed to Bellevue Hospital for 17 days, and also three-years' probation. In other words, he had a criminal history. This may be why he empathized with Jack Henry Abbott. Mailer helped publish Abbott's 1981 memoir, In the Belly of the Beast, collected from their correspondences as Abbott served time. Though Abbott had been found guilty of forgery, bank robbery and murdering another inmate, Mailer thought he had potential as a great writer. As it turned out, In the Belly of the Beast would make Abbott a one-hit wonder. Not only was his followup sort of a flop, but Abbott foolishly threw it all away not long after being freed in June of 81.
  • Trevor Wells
    Published a day ago
    Lifetime Review: 'Was I Really Kidnapped?'

    Lifetime Review: 'Was I Really Kidnapped?'

    After three days of captivity in which she is drugged and tormented by her masked abductor, Elle Whitland (Michelle Mylett) is released outside a gas station and brought to the hospital. After being reunited with her boyfriend Billy (Jacob Blair) and her sister Jen (Anna Hardwick), the trio is brought to the police station for questioning regarding what happened to Elle and who might have taken her.
  • Matthew Trundle
    Published a day ago
    'The Sinner' Sidesteps Conventions to Produce a Binge-Worthy Delight

    'The Sinner' Sidesteps Conventions to Produce a Binge-Worthy Delight

    Throughout the 21st century there has been a rise in the lazy, formulaic crime procedural spearheaded by CBS that has seen a rise in dull, rather cookie-cutter television filled with bland performances and wholly expected narrative outcomes. This was an unexciting transition for the broadcast television landscape but with the rise of streaming these shows are generally passing out of favor now that audiences have so much more choice. These shows' ratings dwindle due to the fact that there's no incentive to watch a show live anymore when the narrative outcome is so unsurprising, and there's a dearth of other options available to watch. To achieve success with this sub-genre, these tiresome conventions must be challenged and subverted; otherwise, people will lose interest. From its first episode, The Sinner achieves this immediately. A conventional procedural may open with the victim meeting their end and then the remaining minutes of the episode follows the team of protagonists doing their job so the criminal is caught and everything is wrapped up tidily, ready for next week's episode. While it's true that the show's opener shows the crime committed very soon into the first episode, the circumstances are changed and the narrative conventions are upended. As we see the perpetrator of the crime commit the criminal act before us there is no question of who, and she is quickly apprehended so there is no rush to capture the criminal either. Instead the focus is on why this inexplicable crime was committed as it appears that there is no circumstance apparent that would lead protagonist Cora Tannetti do such an act to a man she has no apparent connection to. The crime itself surpasses our expectations by being actually shocking in a genre that has become so exploitative. There's also such a palpable atmosphere when Cora repeatedly stabs an unknown male on a family day out to the beach in front of numerous spectators and her own infant child. Whoever selected the song "Huggin' & Kissin'" by Big Black Delta has a gift for selecting such evocative and moody music that becomes more emphatic every time it's played throughout the series. This song is a striking cue that brings back much of Cora's repressed turmoil that wounds her so tightly and the majority of the narrative is about her resurfacing her own suppressed traumas so that she can make sense of her inexplicable crime.
  • Jasmine Smoot-Leyva
    Published 2 days ago
    What Caused Amber Guyger's Conviction?

    What Caused Amber Guyger's Conviction?

    It’s easy to understand our current situation. In the United States, African Americans are three times more likely to be killed by police officers than white people (Mapping Police Violence). Additionally, said offending officers are rarely indicted—and when they are, their sentences are less than favorable. Out of 98 non-federal law enforcement officer arrests, only 35 had been convicted of a crime involving fatal, on-duty shootings since 2005. (Ross, para. 8). The case of Amber Guyger, however, proves to be an exception.
  • Yvonne Knight
    Published 2 days ago
    Child or Not?

    Child or Not?

    I'm sure you have seen the news about Natalia and how there is a big debate about whether she is a teenager or a grown woman. Before I saw The Dr. Phil Show I kept flipping over in my mind; she's a child, not an adult. After watching Dr. Phil, I still keep arguing with myself. I don't understand how a 16-year-old girl could say she's never had a period; that seems a little odd to me. Could any conditions delay puberty by that much? It seemed to me when doctor Phil asked about her previous families, Natalia was maybe willfully holding back specific details. Like when her former foster mother said she couldn't do it anymore after Natalia broke her siblings' arm. It would seem to me that maybe she does have past of aggression, and perhaps that's why she could not make it work with other families. I felt that Natalia looked older than 16 in presenting herself older than 16. Now I know that some teenagers appear to be older than they are because of life experiences. Still, there's usually a personality flaw that tells their age. And I did not see that in Natalia's case, but I am no expert by any means. I think perhaps Natalia's appearance may have hurt her in the long run on The Dr. Phil Show.
  • LUiS Thompson
    Published 4 days ago
    The New York Adventures of the Bulletproof Suit

    The New York Adventures of the Bulletproof Suit

    "A care package dropped off by a drone of some kind lands a suit for Toni Cipriani. The mobster never fully became accustomed to technology. With skepticism high, Toni Cipriani opens the package. A tailored suit with a note attached reading “bulletproof in time of need.” The mobster suited up, a custom two-toned ski mask with a giant letter “T” outlined the suit. Packing up MP5 clips along with as many armor piercing shotgun rounds into a duffel bag. As Toni Cipriani loaded up his black matted sports car, the ideal battle format was simple; engage the federal agent targets and flush the streets out with bullets."
  • Veronica Bohnert
    Published 6 days ago
    How to Scare Burglars

    How to Scare Burglars

    The number of US homes burglarized over the past decade has declined by more than 30 percent, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nonetheless, burglary remains a concern for millions of homeowners. If someone breaks into your home, he or she may steal valuable items while vandalizing and destroying your home in the process. You can scare off burglars and protect your home from criminal mischief, however, in the following ways.
  • Pam Jannes
    Published 7 days ago
    This Is How Many Private Prisons Exist in the US

    This Is How Many Private Prisons Exist in the US

    If you Google the phrase "private prisons," a lot will come up. You can read news articles for days. People for and against these private prisons have made sure the topic stays in the news cycle. And it definitely has stayed in the news. The topic of private prisons can be confusing and overwhelming, and if you are someone who doesn't know a lot about private prisons or how they are funded/run, you may be wondering, "are there really that many private prisons and prisoners in the US that this should be such a big issue?"