Latest in Criminal
  • Shaon S.
    Published about an hour ago
    What is Medical Identity Theft and How Do Hospitals Prevent Them?

    What is Medical Identity Theft and How Do Hospitals Prevent Them?

    What is medical identity theft?
  • Kimi Mormon
    Published about 21 hours ago
    Dorothy Jane Scott

    Dorothy Jane Scott

    Dorothy Jane Scott was a single mother of a 4-year-old. She and her son had been living in Stanton, California with her aunt. She was a secretary for two stores that were jointly owned. One of the stores sold psychedelic items such as love beads and lava lamps. The other was a store that specializes in selling paraphernalia for cannabis and tobacco, also called a head shop. Her friends and coworkers described her as a devout Christian who did not drink or do drugs and who liked to stay home. Dorothy’s parents babysat her son while she worked. Her father said she dated on occasion but that she had no steady boyfriend that they knew of.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published about 23 hours ago
    Review of 'The Nest"

    Review of 'The Nest"

    The Nest concluded its 5-part mini-series Acorn run on Prime Video last night. Top-notch Scottish noir, if there is such a thing, and there should be.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published a day ago
    Reason First: Fresh Flesh-Serial Killer Ed Gein

    Reason First: Fresh Flesh-Serial Killer Ed Gein

    Hollywood has made Ed Gein quite the source material for a number of films including Psycho (1960), the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) and The Silence of the Lambs (1991) to name just a few. What would make writers, directors and producers so interested in this homicidal maniac? One would have to start with the fact that he transitioned.
  • Cameron Crisamore2
    Published a day ago
    PI’s For Hire

    PI’s For Hire

    Opening Credits as the song **Keep On Loving You** by *REO Speedwagon* starts playing
  • Don Stavo
    Published a day ago
    The fixer
Staff Picks
  • Mia O'Sullivan
    Published 9 months ago
    The Great Alcatraz Escape
  • Charles Leon
    Published 9 months ago
    Broken Windows Theory

    Broken Windows Theory

    In the 1980s crime in New York City had reached almost epidemic proportions. Apparently, New York was suffering by increased immigration and as a result a much younger population and, added to that, New Yorkers were hit hard by welfare cuts. It wasn’t safe to travel the subway and you would be advised not to go to certain areas, particularly after dark. Yet, by the end of the 1990s the city had cleaned up its act and saw a dramatic fall in the rate of crime.
  • Herbert Seward III
    Published about a year ago
    Series Review: 'When They See Us'

    Series Review: 'When They See Us'

    So... when I saw this dramatic re-telling of the ordeal of the Central Park 5 being advertised on Netflix, I was already pretty sure that it was going to be must-watch television. I was also extremely apprehensive about seeing the events through the eyes of these five kids (now grown men) and being able to emotionally process it all. The case (and the legal and societal issues it brings to the forefront) kind of hits close to home for me as a parent, and as an African-American man. I'd seen the Ken Burns documentary on the Central Park 5 a while back, so I was already very familiar with the case, and some of the very problematic issues it brought to the table for the American public to address. Systemic racism, classism, and lack of accountability for law enforcement and agents of the legal system were all things that were at the forefront of the documentary. Ava Duvernay did an excellent job of showing the social and personal toll this case had on these men and their families, as well as the greater impact that the institutions of the law and media played in that accrued trauma. Every episode of this mini-series was visceral and traumatic. Whether it was the very public shunning of Yusuf Salaam, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, and Raymond Santana upon their release from custody as adults, to the entire fourth episode being devoted to the ordeal of Korey Wise's experiences at Riker's Island as an adult, the entire progression of the series takes a huge emotional toll on the audience watching it.
  • Daniel Sullivan
    Published about a year ago
    I Thought I'd Always Be a Criminal

    I Thought I'd Always Be a Criminal

    I am a criminal, I heard that so often that I believed it. My mother told me that my father was killed in a shootout with the police, so I grew up with this idea in my head of who I was based on things I was told. Turns out that my father died almost thirty years after my mother told me that he did. I grew up dirt poor and my step father was physically abusive to me and my sister. We moved to a new city every couple of years, I always felt that I did not fit in. Kids, being who they are, would tease me about my Goodwill clothes and my parents ugly car. I started to steal candy from the local store early on and I learned that if I gave candy to the kids that they would like me or at least pretend to. As I got older I began to associate money with acceptance. I never felt like I was good enough for people to just like me, so I bought friends often by stealing and hustling.
  • Vidello Productions
    Published 2 years ago
    13 Expensive Things Owned by Celebrity Prisoners

    13 Expensive Things Owned by Celebrity Prisoners

    13. Montauk Beach Home—Bernie Madoff
  • Mr. Davis
    Published 2 years ago
    The Shocking Story of the UK's Youngest Killer: Mary Bell

    The Shocking Story of the UK's Youngest Killer: Mary Bell

    WARNING: This case involves shocking violence against two children, by another child. This isn't for the faint of heart.
Book Reviews
  • Mimo le Singe
    Published about a month ago
    'Murder on the Orient Express': How Crime Fiction Popularizes World Literature

    'Murder on the Orient Express': How Crime Fiction Popularizes World Literature

    Whodunit enthusiasts have yet to witness another crime author be garlanded with the same, if not more, praise than record-breaking writer Agatha Christie, whose novels have sold over two billion copies worldwide (The Home of Agatha Christie) long after her death. My experience with Christie’s works is admittedly limited, as I have only seen a theatrical performance of The Mousetrap and the 2017 film adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express (hereafter shortened to Orient Express). However, Christie’s masterful command of the twist ending in this novel has led me to explore the rest of her library, and, by extension, the history of Orient Express for the present paper.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about a month ago
    The Executioner’s Song by Norman Mailer

    The Executioner’s Song by Norman Mailer

    It’s been a few years since I read “The Executioner’s Song” when I was eighteen years’ old and it was a funny experience because I’d only ever seen a picture of the book before that. I had constantly wanted to read it over the course of a year because it sounded amazing. But when I received it in the post, my jaw dropped at how long it was in comparison to how long I thought it was. I managed to get it done in a few days anyway. I really just couldn’t put it down at all. At some points, I was actually crying about the other characters. My first reading experience was heavily emotional and I was put into an emotional whirlwind of sorrow. It completely changed my perspective on creative nonfiction, just like the book “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote had done some years before.
  • Marielle Sabbag
    Published 2 months ago
    Reconstructing Amelia - A Book Review

    Reconstructing Amelia - A Book Review

    No matter what, keep fighting to make a change.
Capital Punishment
Celebrities
Fact Or Fiction
  • Vocaler
    Published 2 days ago
    Most Dangerous Streets in The World

    Most Dangerous Streets in The World

    There are some streets you are not welcome, and just by walking down them, you could be making your last mistake. In today's crazy video we are looking at some of the most dangerous streets in the world! Let The Infographics Show transport you to the sketchiest streets across the globe all from the comfort of your couch.
  • Steve Harrison
    Published 3 days ago
    Wild Bill: Gunned down with aces and eights

    Wild Bill: Gunned down with aces and eights

    Just about every poker player on the planet knows that a pair of black aces and eights are “dead man’s hand” and that the reason harks back to when Wild Bill Hickok was shot in the back of the head while holding them in a game of five-card stud in Deadwood, South Dakota.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 4 days ago
    Reason First: Serial Killer Joe Ball the ‘Gator King’

    Reason First: Serial Killer Joe Ball the ‘Gator King’

    When a Texas Ranger named Lee Miller investigated the disappearance of Hazel “Schatzie” Brown, the downfall of serial killer Joe Ball became set into motion. Ball had run a bar after being a bootlegger during Prohibition. He gained fame for his penchant to hold alligators in a tank and to throw live cats and dogs into the pool for the thrills of the patrons in the late 1930’s Texas.
Fiction
Guilty
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published a day ago
    Reason First: Fresh Flesh-Serial Killer Ed Gein

    Reason First: Fresh Flesh-Serial Killer Ed Gein

    Hollywood has made Ed Gein quite the source material for a number of films including Psycho (1960), the original The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) and The Silence of the Lambs (1991) to name just a few. What would make writers, directors and producers so interested in this homicidal maniac? One would have to start with the fact that he transitioned.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 2 days ago
    Reason First: The Psychology of Serial Killer Henry Lee Lucas

    Reason First: The Psychology of Serial Killer Henry Lee Lucas

    With their death sentences commuted to life imprisonment, serial killers Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Toole committed some of the most heinous crimes across three states in just over three decades.
  • SKYLERIZED
    Published 3 days ago
    Reason First: How to Tame a Mad Dog-Serial Killer Jospeh Taborsky

    Reason First: How to Tame a Mad Dog-Serial Killer Jospeh Taborsky

    When you’re one of the very few people to be sentenced to life twice, your system of values must’ve been in serious disarray, to say the least. Joseph “Mad Dog” Taborsky plagued the state of Connecticut with his robberies and murders. He even committed a crime with his brother Albert, who had been committed to a psychiatric ward. This action led to Mad Dog’s sentence to be reduced and he exited death row and claimed that he would keep his nose clean.
Incarceration
  • Marco Bonomo
    Published 13 days ago
    While we were in lockdown, a group of Carabinieri from Piacenza dealt and tortured

    While we were in lockdown, a group of Carabinieri from Piacenza dealt and tortured

    For the first time in the history of Italy, yesterday the judiciary seized an entire police station (the "Levante" of Piacenza) because every type of crime was committed inside it - to the point that investigators spoke of circumstances and "Gomorrah" attitudes.
  • Salem Rosé
    Published 28 days ago
    On Prison Reform for US Prisons

    On Prison Reform for US Prisons

    Overcrowding has been one of the main issues in United States’s prison systems within both prisons and inmates alike. According to statistics gathered from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the US actually comes in at number 13th as the world’s most overcrowded prisons (McCarthy, para. 1). The exceeding population in US prisons has threatened the deterioration of inmate’s and staff’s mental and physical well-being, as well as safety. The leading cause behind overcrowding in US prisons is due to the high rate of recidivism following criminals’ release. In order to prevent recidivism it is imperative that the US promotes prison reform, in which the prison system provides more resources and programs to better equip inmates with the skills to successfully integrate into American society.
  • Marlon Bradley
    Published 29 days ago
    Visitation Day

    Visitation Day

    It had been 20 years since they’d seen each other, and neither knew what to say. David and David Junior, or DJ as his family affectionately called him sat and stared at each other. Each intensely studying the features that they had only seen in the mirror up until this point. They both seemed to be astonished by how much they resemble the other. The younger man had been trying kid this his whole life, but did his best to dismiss it. Even when presented with pictures to prove it, he still shrugged off the comparisons like a running back breaking a tackle. But now, face to face, he couldn’t deny the fact that he was basically staring into a mirror. The older man had spent the last 2 decades in Jefferson City Correctional Facility for manslaughter. And while the crime was committed in self defense, his public defender still pushed him to take a plea deal. “It’s better than the life sentence I would’ve caught for the weight in my trunk.” That’s the way he justified it at the time, and that same thought had brought him a sense of peace over the past 7,254 days. But here he was, just a few months shy of parole, staring at his doppelganger across a steel table.
Investigation
  • Kimi Mormon
    Published about 21 hours ago
    Dorothy Jane Scott

    Dorothy Jane Scott

    Dorothy Jane Scott was a single mother of a 4-year-old. She and her son had been living in Stanton, California with her aunt. She was a secretary for two stores that were jointly owned. One of the stores sold psychedelic items such as love beads and lava lamps. The other was a store that specializes in selling paraphernalia for cannabis and tobacco, also called a head shop. Her friends and coworkers described her as a devout Christian who did not drink or do drugs and who liked to stay home. Dorothy’s parents babysat her son while she worked. Her father said she dated on occasion but that she had no steady boyfriend that they knew of.
  • Kimi Mormon
    Published 2 days ago
    The Case of the Grimes Sisters

    The Case of the Grimes Sisters

    On December 28, 1956, Barbara and Patricia Grimes went to see the Elvis Presley film Love Me Tender at a theater in Brighton Park, a neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois. Barbara was 15 years old and Patricia was 12. Both girls were devoted fans of Elvis. This was the eleventh time they had seen this film. They left their house at around 7:30 pm. They promised their mom they would be home by midnight. The theater was about a mile and a half from their home in McKinley Park. They had about $2.50 when they left home, and Barbara was told to keep 50 cents in her wallet in case they decided to see the second screening of the movie. Dorothy Weinert, a friend of Patricia, told investigators that she sat behind the girls with her sister at the theater that night. Dorothy and her sister left the theater at 9:30 pm but Dorothy saw the sisters in line to buy popcorn at that time. Barbara and Patricia both stayed to watch the second showing of the movie.
  • Navneet Singh
    Published 3 days ago
    Sushant Singh Rajput

    Sushant Singh Rajput

    Actor Sushant Singh Rajput’s father has alleged that Mumbai police were not probing the right people in connection with the suicide of his son, and his lawyer has said Mumbai police were instead pressuring the family to name big film production houses.
Movie Review
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 3 days ago
    Review of 'Uncut Gems'

    Review of 'Uncut Gems'

    I realized years ago when I saw Milton Berle in a serious dramatic role -- I think in The Oscar in the 1960s -- that, contrary to what you might think, comedians can make excellent dramatic actors. Robin Williams confirmed this decades later, with a vengeance, in Insomnia.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published 7 days ago
    Review of 'Motherless Brooklyn'

    Review of 'Motherless Brooklyn'

    The wife and I just saw Motherless Brooklyn on HBO. It's billed as an Edward Norton movie -- he also starred in it -- based on the Jonathan Lethem novel. I didn't read the novel (I was busy writing the sequel to The Silk Code when Lethem's novel was first published in 1999). But it's just as well. As readers of my reviews in Vocal may know, I like reviewing movies and TV series on their own terms, not on how they compare with the novels or short stories on which they may have been based. I will say that my wife mentioned that she saw that the Norton movie departed from the Lethem novel in many major ways.
  • Trevor Wells
    Published 15 days ago
    Lifetime Review: 'Murder in the Vineyard'

    Lifetime Review: 'Murder in the Vineyard'

    After growing tired of hectic life in the city, Emma Kirk (Helena Mattsson) moves back to her small hometown of Paso Roblar with her teenage daughter Beatrice (Emma Fuhrmann) to revitalize her grandfather's winery and reconnect with Beatrice in the wake of her divorce. As the Kirks get settled into town, things initially seem to be going well for them. Emma reconnects with her old boyfriend Luke (Daniel Hall) as she works on the winery's grand re-opening, Beatrice captures the eye of popular soccer player Bryan Hayes (Matthew Erick White).
Tv Review