collection
Music and Business

Music and Business

The ins and outs behind one of the largest industries out there. Get ready to press "play".

  • The Hive Collectif
    Published 15 days ago
    The Independent Struggle

    The Independent Struggle

    The new music business structure isn’t as simple as every artist makes it seem with the shift of more artists trying to strive for independence and neglect record companies or record deals; that simply isn’t the case when it comes to the African continent and its inhabitants. We would like picking apart the inequality and the marginal gap between the privileged and those less fortunate but that would take extensive research and funds to travel across Africa which we currently do not have the funds for and if we had to actively pursue the bottom line on how each African country conducts its music business we wouldn’t be able to get accurate information due to the lack of information being shared online.
  • Dian GU
    Published 18 days ago
    K-pop wave in the UK: Fresh, empowered and confused

    K-pop wave in the UK: Fresh, empowered and confused

    Colette Balmain spent about 12 hours watching Bang Bang Con, a two-day online show of a popular Korean boy band BTS. The show was a collection of previous concerts and fan meetings, which entertained many fans of BTS, also known as ARMYs.
  • Jide Okonjo
    Published 19 days ago
    "We Are Suffering" - Rappers Cry Out.

    "We Are Suffering" - Rappers Cry Out.

    "Every single artiste is hungry."
  • Kristy James
    Published 20 days ago
    It's Time To Focus On Releasing Singles Instead Of An Album. Here's Why!

    It's Time To Focus On Releasing Singles Instead Of An Album. Here's Why!

    With this particular topic, I feel I have always been ahead of the curve. Much to the dismay of my managers, I have never wanted to record a full album, and I always wanted to release every single track before the EP.
  • Awlstylz DJ
    Published 23 days ago
    Music 2020: What happened?

    Music 2020: What happened?

    When we think of music, music is the soundtrack of our lives. If music is the soundtrack of our lives, it should evoke some feelings or move you. I see the current landscape of music today. From Serato Studio to Garageband, music today can be made by any and everyone. Billie Eilish, along with her brother, created the song of the year from the home. Now to the novice music lover or casual lover of music, that may sound like a huge accomplishment. But it also illustrates how music has changed. The passion in the music of the past could be felt in the chords of the songs, the love of music was felt in the arrangements of the instruments. Loverboy's 1980 hit "Turn me loose" is a perfect illustration of the passion that music radiated to its listeners. When you hear the first cymbals of that song along with the keyboards, you felt the energy in that song. There was a certain buildup of the song that you knew that the musicians loved what they did and it emanated through the song. On the other hand, music today has no emotional connection, when music is mass-produced, there is no human element required. Music also is supposed to be a reflection of the times. Weirdly, music today is a reflection of society. Music used to be the reporters of the streets, from N.W.A. to Eric Clapton, music was supposed to give you a snapshot of that era. Social media, reality shows have forever changed the way people perceive reality. Music now is about likes and followers. Music has become watered down to the point where it is no longer escapism of music past. It is the escapism to superficial and unrealistic realities. Another reason that music is passionless is music has become a cash cow or ticket to riches. When your money as the forefront and not the artistry, it's inevitable that music will be able what the consumer wants, not what the artist feels. With the advent of streaming and various platforms to release music, it's easier to make music to release and the more music that's release, the more money can be made. Music also should evoke harmony and unite people. In the 1970s, Disco was genre originally made by blacks and Puerto Ricans but all races and colors were dancing to disco. That was the only, and perhaps the last, time that music brought everybody together. Disco Music had passion because they were telling people to enjoy life. After all, we had to go through so much in the '60s. Songs like Chic's "Good Times" or McFadden and Whitehead's "Aint no stopping us now" were a reflection of the times. They had passion because the music was speaking to people in real-time. Disco music transported people to what a society could be and should be. Passionless music is music that does not inspire the good in people, but an image of what people perceive is good. When artists start caring about what the music sounds like and talk about real-life events, then the passion will come back to music, and people will be able to connect to the music. How can the passion come back to music you ask? First, are you making music that you want or for the money? Secondly, what story are you telling? Is the story a real-life experience or just what you think people want to hear? Thirdly, are you a student of your art or just a fan that's singing? If you can answer those questions honestly, then you are the path of making music with passion again. People love music that you feel the love, passion in song. One thing about entertaining is that if you don't believe in what you're doing or singing, they are going to feel that and they won't feel an emotional attachment as well. That's why when a song comes on nowadays, it may be cool for a little bit, but it fades away quickly. Getting the passion back into music is the first step in revitalizing the quality of music. Can we get to that point again? Only the artists can answer that.
  • Moazam
    Published 26 days ago
    The Future Of Premium Music

    The Future Of Premium Music

    Do you buy music? If so, what do you think the future of paid music will look like? The way we buy music has certainly come a long way: there was a time when we used to all listen to audio cassettes, then came along CDs, digital downloads and now streaming. As technology advances, new methods of listening to and buying music are made available to the masses, but what about the future? How will we be buying music in the future?
  • Timely Comics
    Published 29 days ago
    Music You'd Buy on iTunes

    Music You'd Buy on iTunes

    Prince Of Vibration
  • TRILLIONDOLLARRECORDS
    Published about a month ago
    TRVE SPEAKS ON THE FUTURE IN HIS MUSIC CAREER AND RELEASES LONG-AWAITED​ MUSIC VIDEO

    TRVE SPEAKS ON THE FUTURE IN HIS MUSIC CAREER AND RELEASES LONG-AWAITED​ MUSIC VIDEO

    In an interview with TRVE by Medium publisher says that He’s one of the Hottest Music Artist on The Radar. We have a chance to talk with the next generation artist TRVE to find out more about Him, how he started, his challenges and many other issue.
  • Jennifer Childers
    Published about a month ago
    Album Review: Station to Station by David Bowie

    Album Review: Station to Station by David Bowie

    I mentioned in a review I did of Pink Moon by Nick Drake that every musician seems to have an album where they are presented at their most vulnerable--where we see a genuine look at the pains they are going through. Most Bowie fans would pinpoint his 1977 album Low as this album for him. Personally, I would beg to differ. Low is definitely a great album with stellar experimentation and isolation is a huge feeling one gets throughout the record.