history

The roots of feminism were planted millennia ago; we must understand feminism throughout history to contemplate how much farther we can go.

  • Abba Banks
    Published 11 months ago
    Abba’s Banks Favorite Heroines

    Abba’s Banks Favorite Heroines

    Hi I am Abba Banks, Chakras Awareness Leader from NYC. I am a loving dad of a beautiful daughter, with whom I love discussing pivotal people of history. Being a conscious contributor to culture, the internet, and society; I know my activity is being viewed by the youth, so my goal is to express intelligence and wisdom in harmony. That being said, this post is about my two favorite subjects in life: women and history. It could be considered coincidence or divine synchronicity that March is national Women’s history month, and the month my favorite girl was born. I am going to share two traditionally celebrated heroines in public school history, and one that I was fortunate to have as a awesome teacher, that guided me to doing my own research, to unlock the hidden amazing lives throughout time.
  • Alexia Villanueva
    Published about a year ago
    Hatshepsut

    Hatshepsut

    Pharaoh/Queen Hatshepsut was a female ruler around the 18th dynasty of Egypt. Her husband and half-brother King Thutmose II died unexpectedly about 1479 BC. Her stepson, Thutmose III inherited the throne. Sadly he was too young to rule, so Hatshepsut served as regent. A few years later, with the support the priests of the god, Amun, she crowned herself Pharaoh.
  • Chase E.H.
    Published about a year ago
    The Complexity of Equality and Why It Disrupted America’s Feminist Movement

    The Complexity of Equality and Why It Disrupted America’s Feminist Movement

    After its introduction to Congress in 1923, the Equal Rights Amendment illuminated the separation between politically motivated women in America. Two sides of feminism began to emerge afterwards, “one hostile to the blending of feminism with social justice goals, one captured by those goals” (Sklar, “Abstract”). This division lasted for multiple decades after the initial fissure, and was only slightly overcome with the development of the second wave of feminism during the 1960s. The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) presented a wedge between women in America, and exposed the class differences of those women. However, only by studying the decades before and after the ERA’s inception can an understanding of why and how the division amongst feminists came about become clear. Differences of opinion regarding the definition of “equality,” and how such equality should be achieved, ultimately led to the separation within the feminist movement in America.
  • Cece Koenig
    Published about a year ago
    Frida Kahlo

    Frida Kahlo

    To be a hero can be interpreted many ways by different people. Frida Kahlo can be considered heroic for several reasons. Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter who was born in 1907. She inspired people of many different backgrounds and challenges. She faced extreme physical and mental obstacles herself. Some people may argue that, as an artist, Frida Kahlo was only painting for the money, especially because a lot of her work has been put on display. Even though some believe this, Frida Kahlo should be considered a hero because she demonstrates the qualities of caring, courage and patience.
  • Kaitlyn Smith
    Published about a year ago
    Anne Boleyn Is My Spirit Animal

    Anne Boleyn Is My Spirit Animal

    I have always been fascinated by history and people's stories but I have a special passion for the story of Anne Boleyn. To some she was the most infamous adulterous in British history but to me she was a woman in the wrong time. She was smart, ambitious and she stood up for the right to be respected as a woman and not some King's side piece. In my London adventures, I have had the chance to visit two historic destinations where the life of Anne Boleyn played out.
  • Victoria Martínez
    Published 2 years ago
    The 19th Century Swedish Novel Missing from the Feminist Literary Canon

    The 19th Century Swedish Novel Missing from the Feminist Literary Canon

    In surveys of the most important novels by 19th century women writers, the focus is usually on the works of Anglo and French authors like the Brontë sisters, Louisa May Alcott and George Sand. Yet for all their significance and value, few of these contributed to furthering both social and legal change as much as the frequently overlooked novel of one of Sweden’s most important women writers.
  • Leigh Fisher
    Published 2 years ago
    Standing Up for Your Choices

    Standing Up for Your Choices

    Standing up to disapproving family members to defend your relationship choices isn’t easy, but women have been standing up for what they want for hundreds of years — even in China in 170 CE. During the Eastern Han dynasty, a young woman known as Lady Wu did just that.
  • Stephanie MacLeod
    Published 2 years ago
    The Furies: A Modern Antagonist from the Past

    The Furies: A Modern Antagonist from the Past

    Strong female characters have become a desirable aspect for writers of all styles. The direct stereotype of damsel-in-distress appeals to audiences as it shows how women are so much more than what they've previously been portrayed as in society. All female films, female directors, female writers and female producers are becoming more common in our day, alongside such modern phenomena as the #MeToo movement (intended not just for women, of course) have goaded us into thinking that female lead theatre and film is the result of modern thinking. However, I believe that the inclusion of strong females in the arts industry goes back much further than most realise: to the Ancient Greeks. Not only did strong women like Sappho make the arts their own, but the Furies were written as the powerful main antagonists of The Eumenides. The final installment in the only ancient trilogy to still exist, The Oresteia by Aeschylus.
  • A. Lello
    Published 2 years ago
    The Tudor Witch

    The Tudor Witch

    Ha! Gotcha with that "Witch" tagline didn't I? Just kidding! There is no Tudor witch (that we know of, at least.) However, the English court of Henry VIII may have felt differently in regards to Anne...She was quite a woman ahead of her time. Managing to seduce a king without becoming his official mistress--and instead became his Queen.
  • Siena Dini
    Published 2 years ago
    Niki de Saint-Phalle

    Niki de Saint-Phalle

    Niki de Saint-Phalle was born Catherine Marie-Agnes Fal de Saint-Phalle on October 29, 1930 in France, to a French father and an American mother. She was the second of five children in a wealthy family, who unfortunately lost their fortune and business in the stock market collapse. Niki spent most of her childhood in New York City, although she maintained strong connections with her family in France through frequent visits. Her first career was her fashion modeling, and she had photographs appearing in Vogue and Life. When she was 18 she eloped with her childhood friend Harry Mathews. In 1950 Niki began creating her first paintings while her new husband studied music at Harvard University. Their first child, Laura Gabriela-Duke, was born in Boston in 1951. Unfortunately, the young couple did not take too kindly to raising a child, and they would often leave her in their home alone while they went out for a few hours. Their son, Philip, was born in 1955 prematurely and was kept in a n over-oxygenated incubator which left him with impaired vision, while his parents did not seem to realize there was a problem. In 1953 Niki was put into a mental clinic for a nervous breakdown after her husband found a collection of razors, scissors, and knives under her mattress. During her stay in the hospital she became consumed with making art and she decided to become a painter after she left the clinic. In the early 1960s Niki began her collection of “shooting paintings,” which were assemblages of different figures filled with paint that she shot with pistols, cannon fire, or rifles. The impact would create spontaneous effects, finishing the work. The shooting paintings evolved to become a sort of performance, drawing much attention. In the 1970s an old friend’s brothers offer Niki a parcel of land in Tuscany, Italy for her to build a sculpture garden, which has been her dream for a while. This work consumes Niki’s thoughts and energies for the next twenty some years. On May 21, 2002, at the age of 71, Niki dies in La Jolla, California. Her uncompleted projects are finishes with the help of her granddaughter, Bloum Cardenas, and her longtime assistants.
  • Jade Rosario
    Published 2 years ago
    Celia, A Slave

    Celia, A Slave

    Celia, A Slave was a book published by Melton A. McLaurin based on a true story about a woman named Celia. Celia was an African American female who lived in Audrain County, Missouri, which bordered Callaway to the North, until she was purchased by Robert Newsom in 1850 (McLaurin, 11). By this year, she was approximately fourteen years old, but other than that not much was known about her before her arrival to the Newsom farm. Historians do not know if she was born in Audrain County, whether she had been the property of a farmer, or how many masters she had had previously (McLaurin, 11). While working on the Newsom farm, Celia cooked for the Newsom household, which consisted of Robert Newsom, his son Harry, and his daughters, Virginia and Mary (McLaurin, 11). In addition to her household duties, Robert Newsom treated her as his concubine. Newsom molested and raped Celia, which eventually led to his murder. The relationships of race, gender, and power in the antebellum South were revealed in many aspects of Celia’s life as a slave, as shown in her experiences with rape by Robert Newsom and her court case.
  • Leigh Fisher
    Published 2 years ago
    Empowering Women in Classical China

    Empowering Women in Classical China

    Around 190 CE China, it was common for girls’ personal names to be unrecorded by history. Instead, all we have left is to know them by their family names. One such woman born in this era was Lady Sun, but she didn’t let society stop her from trampling over gender norms with her one hundred armed female soldiers. This kind of female empowerment and early feminism is a rare find in this time period. A unit of female guards, all armed with swords and other weapons, was positively unheard of in the Han Dynasty, but when China split into three separate kingdoms, things like gender norms became a little more relaxed.