history

The roots of feminism were planted millennia ago; we must understand feminism throughout history to contemplate how much farther we can go.

  • Kelsey Lange
    Published 2 years ago
    Deadliest Female Assassins in World History

    Deadliest Female Assassins in World History

    The most horrific, disgusting, terrifying, and evil women in world history. As hard as it is to wrap your head around, these female assassins' stories are very real and very appalling to learn.
  • Karina Thyra
    Published 2 years ago
    Brie Larson to Produce & Star in Victoria Woodhull Biopic: 5 More Women Forgotten by History Who Deserve Their Own Films

    Brie Larson to Produce & Star in Victoria Woodhull Biopic: 5 More Women Forgotten by History Who Deserve Their Own Films

    Women played different roles in changing the path of history. They were scientists, composers, warriors, writers and leaders. Still, there are many whose stories remain unheard of; their struggles and legacy deserved to be honored.
  • A. Lello
    Published 2 years ago
    Marie Antoinette: Debunking the Myths

    Marie Antoinette: Debunking the Myths

    Everyone, for the most part, has at least heard the name of the most notorious queen, Marie Antoinette. If not her name, they've at least heard the infamous fable of the phrase: "Let them eat cake." For hardcore historians and fans like myself, it's a hard pill to swallow when your ill-informed teacher makes the mistake of asking the class "Who said let them eat cake?" and accepts the answer: "Marie Antoinette."
  • Sierra George
    Published 2 years ago
    The Unsung Women of WWII: The WASPs

    The Unsung Women of WWII: The WASPs

    If you've ever attended school, you must know about the Second World War and how countries all over the globe came together to fight a war of political ideology of every extreme. Democracy, Fascism, Totalitarianism and so much more. We hear every November about the heroes who fought for this country and how thankful we should be that they did so. I am thankful for those who sacrificed their own lives to fight for what's right for this country and for the rest of the world. But what if I told you that women were actually allowed to serve in combat during this war? Sounds crazy right? But these women didn't serve on the ground, they could be only be found in the sky.
  • Sahala Smith
    Published 2 years ago
    The Unfamed Sisters of Science

    The Unfamed Sisters of Science

    When you think about women in science, your mind will often drift to names like Marie Curie and Ada Lovelace.
  • Shante Hernandez
    Published 2 years ago
    Anne Frank

    Anne Frank

    The Diary of Anne Frank is a very popular, number-1 selling book in the whole wide world. Before the diary became popular, the beautiful young writer Anne Frank was born Annelies Marie Frank on June 12, 1929 in Frankfurt, Germany. She lived with her parents Otto Frank and Edith Frank-Holländer and older sister Margot Frank. Anne was born in a time where there was a lot of political chaos in Germany. Her family decided to move to Amsterdam when Adolf Hitler won the election. It was there where she attended school at Montessori. She was a very friendly, talkative, and outstanding young girl. She loved to read and do a lot of writing and journalism a lot. Even though she was very talkative, she was also secretive. She wouldn't even share with her best friends at school.
  • Lainey Miller
    Published 2 years ago
    The First Lady of American Cinema

    The First Lady of American Cinema

    Miss Lillian Gish was a pioneer in film. A natural-born actress by heart, she lent her talents to the stage before transitioning to film. Upon its creation, she was quickly introduced to this new platform, which they called "moving pictures" at the time. Little did she know, one hundred years later, she would still make an impact on audiences today.
  • Jules Fortman
    Published 2 years ago
    A Timeline of the Feminist Movement

    A Timeline of the Feminist Movement

    Feminism has changed the world we live in, and these days, many of us couldn't imagine living in a world like The Handmaid's Tale. Not too long ago, though, that was basically what reality was like for the ladyfolk throughout the world.
  • Nataleigh Jones
    Published 2 years ago
    Beautifully Silent Part 1

    Beautifully Silent Part 1

    I have tried to fight the currents of life, from wanting to keep something how it is to having something ripped from your grasp. When you are young, you don't know much; you only know who to love, who to trust, and your mind thinks that everything is completely perfect. I was young when I thought my world was, until I was older did I realize it wasn't. So many changes had to be made, none of them where mine. I was born into society, and because I was young, I had no idea how I had to fit into the world. My parents where rich, so they gave me everything I could want. I had the best tutors, all of them said I was an extremely fast learner.
  • Joely Acosta
    Published 2 years ago
    Women of Color, Shirley Chisholm and Intersectionality

    Women of Color, Shirley Chisholm and Intersectionality

    Shirley Chisholm was the first U.S. Black woman to be elected into the House of Representatives in 1961. She becomes the political embodiment of the needs and wants of the poverty-ridden neighborhood Bedford Stuyvesant of Brooklyn. This challenged the traditional ways of the patriarchal democracy of the United States. Additionally, if this did not scare the patriarchal strings attached to the stagnation of progress in the black community, she decided in 1972, to be the first African American woman to seriously run for the presidency as Democratic nominee.
  • Katie-Rose Coughlan
    Published 2 years ago
    Why Were Women So Accused of Being Witches in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries?
  • Swaay
    Published 2 years ago
    5 Unsung Female War Heroes

    5 Unsung Female War Heroes

    It’s not often you hear tales of female war heroes. And why? Because women were only allowed into combat in very recent history. The first female U.S participants in war (officially) was in the last years of World War I when 33,000 women were commissioned as nurses and support staff for the male soldiers. In 1948 there came into effect the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act of 1948, that excluded women from any and all combat positions in wars henceforth. The act has been lifted to varying degrees in 1993 and 2001, to let women engage in combat through some areas of the military. In 2013 it was completely lifted to allow female participation in all aspects of the U.S military including the Navy and the Marines.