Latest in Unbalanced

  • Keoni Conlu
    Published about 3 hours ago
    NFL Mock Draft

    NFL Mock Draft

    Following the first wave of free agency, I thought it would be a great time to do another mock draft. I did this draft with my brother JAC Conlu to have more fun with it. A lot of big moves were done so far in free agency making this time of the year always exciting as a fan. This mock draft was done following the additions through free agency and catered to what the remaining needs are for each team. No trades were done in this mock draft.
  • MB
    Published about 5 hours ago
    1964 Olympics

    1964 Olympics

    The 1964 Winter Olympics, officially known as the IX Olympic Winter Games, is a multi-sport winter event held from January 29th to February 9th, 1964 in Innsbruck, Austria. The Games featured 1091 athletes from 36 countries and carried the Olympic Torch to Joseph Rieder, a former alpine skier who had competed in the 1956 Winter Olympics. The Games were affected during training by the deaths of Australian alpine skier Ross Milne and British lugeracer Kazimierz Kay-Skrzypeski, and three years afterwards by the deaths of the entire U.S. hockey team and family members. Just Innsbruck applied for an invitation against Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and Lahti, Finland to host the 1964 Winter Olympics. This is the same tally of votes this took place on May 26, 1959, at the 55th IOC Session in Munich, West Germany: the games were opened by a concert conducted by the Vienna Philharmonic under Karl Böhm's baton. The first concert included 7th Symphony by Beethoven, and 40th Symphony by Mozart. Historically the warm Innsbruck had been influenced by a lack of snow. The Austrian army removed 20,000 ice cubes from the top of a mountain and sent them to tracks of bobsleigh and luge. They provided the alpine ski courses with 40,000 cubic metres of snow too. The Soldiers rushed down the slopes by hand and foot. All the women's speed skating events are headed by Lidia Skoblikova. Italian bobsleigh pilot Eugenio Monti has enriched himself by helping Britain's Tony Nash and Robin Dixon win the gold medals and sending them a cracked axle bolt to repair it. The Italians took bronze, but Monti was first elected recipient of the Pierre de Coubertin sportsmanship award. Austrian Egon Zimmermann took the gold medal in the alpine downhill skiing championship for men. Knut Johannesen from Norway hit fastest time at the Olympics in the men's 5,000 m speed skating event. Klavdiya Boyarskikh of the U.S.S.R. won three gold medals in cross-country skiing, and Finnish Eero Mäntyranta won two on the men's side and received the nickname "Mr. Seefeld" after his success in the position. The French sisters Christine and Marielle Goitschel finished first and second in slalom and giant slalom in alpine skiing, respectively. Ski jumping took on a second event, and the Olympic debut in the luge competition. The Games have been previously noteworthy as East and West Germany formed a combined squad the last time. The Closing Ceremonies first took place in a venue other than the opening ceremonies. In Innsbruck 36 Rivals had been allocated to play. China, Mongolia and North Korea took part in the Winter Games for the very first time. Players from West Germany and East Germany played together as the United Team from 1956 to 1964.Australian alpine skier Ross Milne and British luge slider KazimierzKay-Skrzypeski died while practising and exercising just before the Olympics. The planning commission previously said Ross fell into a tree during a hearing. The IOC also said inexperience may have been a factor in Ross's death. Boss John Wagner suggested that overcrowding played a role in beating a multitude of competitors, saying that Milne had been attempting to slow down "on a position you couldn't jump or run" His uncle Malcolm Milne competed at the 1968 and 1972 Winter Olympics. On the road to the Prague World Championships on 15 February 1961, when Sabena Flight 548 crashed in Brussels, Belgium, the entire United States Figure Skating team and other club members, coaches, and officials were killed. The event prompted the cancellation of the World Championships of1961 which demanded the creation of a new American skating programme. Gold won on 34 athletic competitions in six different disciplines.
  • Stephanie Dolce
    Published about 6 hours ago
    Life's Simple Joys: Sports
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1968 Olympics

    1968 Olympics

    The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, was a multi-sport winter festival that was held in Grenoble, France in 1968 and opened on February 6. Thirty-countries attended. In all the alpine skiing events the Frenchman Jean-Claude Killy has won three gold medals. Peggy Fleming won the United States 'first female figure skating gold medal. The games are allocated for making U.S. More famous Winter Olympics, not least due to ABC's intensive coverage of Fleming and Killy, who were instantly celebrity youngsters. The year 1968 marked the first time that the IOC had allowed East and West Germany to compete independently and the IOC for the first time required mandatory alcohol and gender testing. François Raoul, Prefect of the Isère Département, and Raoul Arduin, Chairman of the Dauphiné Ski Federation, publicly proposed the possibility of staging the 1968 Olympic Winter Games in Grenoble on 24 November 1960 for the first time. After the city council decided in principle, numerous government departments offered their assistance and the villagers around Grenoble reacted favourably, Albert Michallon, the former mayor of Grenoble, formed and chaired a plan committee on 30 December 1960. The recommendation was formally made to the IOC at a conference held in Lausanne in February 1963 involving IOC executives and members of international sporting organisations. In this case, the decision was not focused purely on sport as there were only two relevant sporting competitions in the Isère Department, the 1951 Bobsleigh World Championships in L'Alpe d'Huez and the 1959 Luge World Championships in Villard-de-Lans. Grenoble's population rose from 102,000 to 159,000 during 1946 and 1962, and the total population in Isère's department dropped from 139,000 to 250,000. Technology advancement was unable to keep pace with this exponential growth, and was essentially trapped at the same stage as before World War II. Many responsible have never kept it a secret that it is only for them to use the Olympic Games to get bigger funds to quickly improve outdated infrastructure to boost local economies. After Grenoble was chosen as the host city, the organising committee was determined by the French National Olympic Sports Committee. The game was first arranged by the Comité d'Organisation des dixièmes Jeux Olympiques, the body to coordinate the 10th Olympic Games, on 1 August 1964. Albert Michallon was the president of COJO, and was the former mayor of Grenoble. The upper panel consisted of the general assembly and its 340 members, and the advisory board was in charge of doing business and 39 members, 19 of whom were named and the other 20 elected. The Secretary General is comprised of five primary offices and 17 regional departments. In February 1968, the number of workers rose to 1920. They carried out "World Sports Weeks" to test the new sporting facility and develop the operational processes. Speed skating contests and ski races were held from 20 January to 19 February 1967, an ice hockey demonstration from 12 to 15 October 1967 and a figure-skiing contest from 23 to 25 November. On 16 December 1967 in ancient Greece the Olympic torch was illuminated at Olympia. The ceremony was initially expected to take place on 13 December but had to be delayed due to King Constantine II's coup d'état, which had been pushed out of his seat eight months ago, against Georgios Papadopoulos 'dictatorial military rule. Originally the torch relay path led from Mount Olympus to Athens. From there the torch was transported by an Air France Boeing 707 to Paris-Orly airport. The 1960 Downhill Olympic gold medalist Jean Vuarnet, who turned it over to the first torchbearer Alain Mimoun, the 1956 marathon Olympic gold medalist, got the torch there on 19 December. The emblem shows a spinning snow diamond flanked by three stylised roses and on top of the Olympic Rings in one hue. The roses are contained in the same style as the Symbol of Grenoble. The emblem covers the 1968 Grenoble "Xes Jeux Olympiques d'Hiver"
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1984 Olympics

    1984 Olympics

    The 1984 Winter Olympics, formally known as the XIV Olympic Winter Games, was a multi-sport winter festival held in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina, from 8–19 February 1984. Sapporo, Japan; and the Gothenburg member cities, including Sweden. It was the first Winter Olympic Games held in a democratic state and in a Slavic-speaking area. Following the Moscow, Soviet Union, 1980 Summer Olympics, it was also the second overall Olympics to be held in a Socialist and Slavic-speaking region, as well as the second consecutive Olympics. At the moment, Sarajevo, present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina capital, was part of the unified Yugoslavia. The torch relay started at the Winter Olympics in Olympia in 1984, and then travelled to Dubrovnik by aeroplane. Yugoslavia had a minimum span of 5,289 kilometres for torch relay. Two main highways — one in the west and one in the east. The final torchbearer was figure skater Sanda Dubravčić who won the torch from skier athlete Ivo Čarman from a total of 1600. One of the first two torches still resides in a private collection in Žalec, Slovenia, Slovenia. Additionally, after the first early games in Athens, it was the first Games played on the Balkans. The Sarajevo games have also been the only Olympics witnessed so far by a competitor of the Non-Aligned Movement. On 18 May 1978 at an 80th session of the International Olympic Committee in Athens, Greece, the host city for the XIV Winter Olympics was announced. Sarajevo had been picked by a three-way margin over Sapporo, Japan. Gothenburg became Sweden's first city to drop an Olympic Winter Olympic bid while other Swedish cities like Falun and Östersund would subsequently withdraw their successive bids for Montreal, Albertville, Lillehammer, Nagano and Salt Lake. In Greece there are also 20 more torches borne by individual competitors who were torchbearers from Ancient Olympia to the local military airport, and from Athens Domestic Airport to Panathinaikon Stadium where the Olympic Torch was handed over to the Sarajevo Olympic Games Committee. At the opening ceremonies the Olympic flag was hoisted upside down by accident. Juan Antonio Samaranch presided over First Match. Women's Nordic Skiing featured in the 20 kilometre event. Skier Jure Franko has won the first Olympic Winter medal for Yugoslavia; a silver in the giant slalom. For independent women Marja-Liisa Hämäläinen has won all three cross-country events. Gaétan Boucher and Karin Enke won two gold medals apiece in speed skating while East German women won all but three of the event's 12 medals. Austria, which has traditionally been a strong winter sports national, just earned a bronze medal. Biathletes Eirik Kvalfoss and Peter Angerer have won a perfect medal collection. The twin brothers Phil and Steve Mahre finished first and second respectively in slalom. Torvill and the Dean of Great Britain have won perfect ratings around the board for artistic performance in the ice dancing festival's free dance category, an accomplishment that has never been replicated before. The gold medals for figure skating were divided between four nations: while the Great Britain ice dancing contest was won by Torvill and Dean, the Soviet Union's Elena Valova and Oleg Vasiliev won the pair skating title, the men's Scott Hamilton won gold for the United States and Katarina Witt captured the first of two straight gold medals for East Germany in the women's single title. For the first season adaptive skiing became a spotlight event. Bill Johnson has been the first American to win a downhill race in Olympic history. Senegal's Lamine Guèye becomes the first Black African skier to participate at Winter Olympics. In the figure skating centre, the closing ceremonies took place indoor. The 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver marks the first time the Winter Games closing ceremony marks held indoors. For the 1984 Winter Olympics, Yugoslav newspaper readers were asked to select the mascot from a six preference set. Vučko, the tiny wolf created by Slovenian artist and illustrator Jože Trobec, was the winner. A chipmunk, a fox, a mountain goat, a porcupine and a rabbit were among the other contestants. The Vučko is a longstanding symbol of Sarajevo.
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1952 Olympics

    1952 Olympics

    Between 14th to 25th February 1952, the 1952 Winter Olympics, formally known as the VI Olympic Winter Games, were held in Oslo, Norway. Discussions began as early as 1935 over Oslo staging the Winter Olympic Games; the city decided to host the 1948 Olympics because World War II was impossible to do so. Alternatively, in a series that featured Cortina d'Ampezzo in Italy and Lake Placid in the USA, Oslo secured the right to host the 1952 Olympics. With the exception of the alpine skiing competitions held at Norefjell, 113 km from the capital, all venues were in the metropolitan area of Oslo. A new hotel was built along with three dormitories to accommodate players and coaches for the press and dignitaries, establishing the village of the first professional athlete. The City of Oslo, in exchange for the income they generated, kept the financial responsibility of hosting the Games. The Games drew 694 athletes who competed in 4 disciplines and 22 events from 30 nations. Japan and Germany returned to the Olympic Winter Tournament because they weren't able to boycott the 1948 Games following World War II. As East Germany failed to participate as a single team, Germany was represented only by West German athletes. Portugal and New Zealand made their Winter Olympic debuts and women were permitted to take part in cross country skiing for the first time. Norwegian truck driver Hjalmar Andersen took three of four speed skating events to become the most decorated Olympic attendee. Of bobsleigh Germany regained its previous dominance, competing of four- and two-man competition. The United States 'Dick Button made the first triple jump in international competition to win his second consecutive Olympic title skating men's figure. The 1952 Games featured a showcase event, a bandy, but the competition was disputed by only three Nordic countries. Norway received 16 medals, of which seven were gold, for general medal competition. The Games closed with the raising of a banner heading from one of the host cities of Winter Olympics into the other. At each subsequent Winter Games the banner which became known as the "Oslo flag" was displayed at the host city. Anti-German rhetoric started to form plans for the 1952 Olympics during the German invasion of Norway during World War II. There were discussions on whether it should allow Germany to compete in the Olympics. When the IOC approved the West German Olympic Committee in 1950, it addressed the question of whether their inclusion in the forthcoming Games would spark international boycotts. The West German Olympic Committee West Germany was officially invited to compete in the 1952 Winter Olympics after the IOC accepted it. East Germany had been invited to collaborate as a joint entity with West Germany but refused. Norway refused to welcome German players at first and some became regarded as Nazi sympathisers. For example, Norwegian speed skater Finn Hodt was not permitted to join the Norwegian speed skating team because after the war he had collaborated with the Nazis. In the result, Norway has decided to promote the inclusion of German and Japanese competitors in the issue. The Soviet Union did not send any athletes to Oslo, though the IOC accepted it. They had intended to field an ice hockey championship team but applied too late to join the Ice Hockey Federation International. On 15 February, the opening ceremonies were held at Bislett Stadium. King George VI of Great Britain died on 6 February 1952 with his daughter Elizabeth II taking the throne as a queen, eight days before the start of the Games. As a result, all the national flags flew in half, and Princess Ragnhild opened the Games instead of her grandfather, King Haakon VII, who attended the London funeral. It was the first time a female official has left an Olympic Games open. Traditionally, the nation parade was conducted with Greece first, the rest of the nations followed by Norwegian alphabetic order, the last being the host country.
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1960 Olympics

    1960 Olympics

    The 1960 Winter Olympics, formally known as the VIII Olympic Winter Games, were a winter multi-sport festival held in Squaw Valley, California, United States from 18–28 February 1960. Squaw Valley was chosen to host the Games at the International Olympic Committee meeting held in 1956. This was an undeveloped property in 1955, and the houses and all the facilities were constructed from 1956 to 1960 at a cost of US$ 80,000,000. It was intended to be informal, allowing fans and rivals to walk to almost any venue. Squaw Valley welcomed athletes from thirty countries, participating in four athletic competitions and twenty-seven. The athletes made their Olympic speed skating and biathlon debuts. Following a vote showing that only nine nations were willing to send a bobsled team, organisers agreed that the bobsled events would not afford the cost of constructing a venue, and the bobsled was not on the Olympic Winter schedule for the first and last time. Cold War diplomacy has compelled the IOC to discuss China's and Taiwan's position. Though China was behind the Soviet Union, the US remained behind Taiwan. Considering that the 1960 Games were to take place in America, IOC members were angry that the US did not allow it to compete with China or any other Communist nation. In 1957, IOC president Avery Brundage, an American himself, declared that if the US declined to represent another nation accepted by the IOC, then the offer to host the Squaw Valley Olympics would be revoked and the presidency dissigned. Bowing to external criticism, the United States has permitted athletes from the Communist countries to compete. China continued to insist on withdrawing Taiwan from the IOC, requests which were rejected before China cut off its ties and ended the possibility of joining in 1960. Squaw Valley was a failing ski resort with limited amenities making its selection a failure to host the Olympic Winters of 1960. Wayne Poulsen and Alexander Cushing, inspired by a newspaper storey on an Olympic bid, note that Reno, Nevada and Anchorage, Alaska, have expressed interest in the Olympics. Poulsen, chairman of Squaw Valley Development Corporation, petitioned California Governor Goodwin Knight to approve a proposal to host the Olympic Games. Knight's office approved the $1,000,000 payment, and urged the California Legislature to approve it. On 7 January 1955 the United States Olympic Committee accepted the bid on the basis of financial support from the State of California. Cushing and the USOC also issued a bill accepted by the US Congress and signed by President Dwight Eisenhower calling on the International Olympic Committee to consider Squaw Valley's 1960 Games bid. Preliminary reports were written and submitted to the IOC which had received offers from Innsbruck, Austria, St. Moritz, Switzerland and Chamonix, France. A temporary right to host the Olympics was given to Squaw Valley, but IOC president Avery Brundage warned the Organizing Committee that the contract would be awarded to Innsbruck before more funding had been secured by April 1956. The State Senate pledged another $4,000,000 which met Brundage's requirements. On 4 April 1956 Squaw Valley was formally awarded the right to host the 1960 Winter Olympics. Participants and officials from European nations were irritated by the architecture; they felt the alpine ski courses were not up to standards and the athletes would consider the altitude too difficult. Television was not new to the Olympic Winter Games; the 1956 broadcasting of the games had started by the European audiences. The auction of the USA's sole broadcast rights to air the Games was groundbreaking. The Planning Committee voted to sell the TV broadcasting rights to CBS for $50,000. This was not clear at the time how profitable it would have been to sell television rights. Beginning from the 1960 Summer Olympics, CBS acquired $550,000 in broadcast rights.
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1956 Olympics

    1956 Olympics

    The 1956 Winter Olympics, officially known as the VII Winter Games, were a multi-sport festival held from 26 January to 5 February 1956 in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy. First awarded at the 1944 Winter Olympics, Cortina defeated Toronto, Colorado Springs, and Lake Placid in 1956 for the right to host the Games. The Cortina Games were unique in that each location was within walking distance. The organising committee provided financial assistance for infrastructure upgrades to the Italian government, but much of the Games 'expense had to be privately funded. The planning committee was also the first to rely heavily on support for corporate sponsorship. Thirty-two nations took part in the four sporting competitions, and twenty-four – by far the highest number of countries taking part in the Winter Olympics. Toni Sailer from Austria was the first competitor to sweep all three alpine skiing events in one single Olympics. For the last time in those Games the figure skating exhibition was played outdoors. Logistically the only obstacle faced at alpine ski competitions was a shortage of snow. To counter this, the Italian army brought in huge quantities of snow to provide sufficient protection for the courses. Politics didn't influence the 1956 Winter Games — unlike the Melbourne Summer Games, Where later in the year other nations boycotted the Hungarian Revolution after the Soviet repression, and the Suez War. The Cortina Olympics was the first reporting for international viewers during the Winter Olympics. Cortina is expected to co-host Winter Olympics with Milan in 2026, 70 years from the Games in 1956. Cortina d'Ampezzo is a ski resort village located in the Mountains of the Dolomites, in Italy's north east corner. It had a population of 6,500, in 1956. Count Alberto Bonacossa, an experienced alpine skier, figure skater and member of the International Olympic Committee since 1925, led the campaign to add Cortina d'Ampezzo to the Olympic Games. He persuaded the city council of Cortina to apply for the Games of 1944. Cortina d'Ampezzo was awarded the 1944 Winter Olympics at the 38th IOC Congress held in London in 1939 but the Games were cancelled due to the start of World War II. The Italian Winter Sports Federation met in Milan in 1946 and voted to approve a new effort to host the Winter Games at Cortina. Cortina's bid to host the 1952 Winter Olympics at the 40th IOC Session in Stockholm, Sweden, was suggested by a delegation headed by Count Bonacossa They received support from both the town hall and the National Olympic Committee of Italy. Cortina is strongly rejected by a competing offer from Oslo, Norway. Count Bonacossa and CONI also tabled a new proposal for the Winter Games of 1956. Selection of the host city took place in Rome, at the 43rd IOC conference. On 28 April 1949, Cortina d'Ampezzo was chosen from bids from Toronto, Colorado Springs and Lake Placid, with 75% of the vote. Unfortunately, three years before he could see Cortina organising the Games, Bonacossa died on 30 January 1953. In all, 32 nations had sent the athletes to Cortina d'Ampezzo. Bolivia and Iran first participated along with the Soviet Union in the Winter Olympics, making Bolivia the first entirely tropical nation to take part in a Winter Olympic. After skipping the 1952 Winter Olympics, Japan, Liechtenstein and Turkey joined, while Canada, Denmark, New Zealand and Portugal did not partake in those Games, despite having played in the previous edition. Participants from West Germany and East Germany competed together as Germany's Joint Team, an alliance which would continue for the next two Olympiads. Since the allies triumphed in World War II, the Cold War came to an end. Most soviet countries in Eastern Europe had participated in Worker's Games or Spartakiads until 1952. The Soviet Union returned from international exile by eschewing the Spartakiad and taking part in the 1952 Helsinki Summer Olympics; they made their debut at the Cortina Games at the Winter Olympics.
  • MB
    Published about 23 hours ago
    1972 Olympics

    1972 Olympics

    The 1972 Winter Olympics, also known as the XI Olympic Winter Games, is a multi-sport winter event held in Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan from February 3rd to February 13th, 1972. This became the first Winter Games to be hosted outside of Europe and North America, and after Melbourne and Tokyo only the third game became contested in those areas. Originally Sapporo secured the right to host the 1940 Winter Olympics but after his 1937 occupation of China, Japan resigned as host of the Games. In the end the games of 1940 were abandoned. Until then, the games have been organised by all the cities which granted games that were postponed due to war. Banff, Lahti, and Salt rivalled Sapporo The Games were debated at the 64th IOC Conference on April 26, 1966, held in Rome, Italy. The Japanese designed new large-scale buildings at Sapporo in anticipation, and held a trial run a full year ahead of the Olympics. An foreign sport week was arranged in February 1971 to assess the goals of the city as well as test its public mettle and hospitality, and this effort was recognised as "total success" by Olympic observers. Developing new facilities has proved to be a big boost for the Sapporo economy: by the time of the Games, the regional government had spent some $500 million in upgrading The Games organisers themselves made a respectable profit in part because they set a record of $8.47 million in broadcast rights. American Barbara Ann Cochran, one of three U.S. brothers on the Women's Alpine Skiing Team, shocked the world and became the first American woman to win a Gold Medal on Skiing when Andrea Mead Lawrence put first in the Slalom with an impressive first run followed by an even better second. Swiss almost obscure Marie-Thérès Nadig won both downhill and giant slalom competitions in alpine skiing. Norway's Magnar Solberg became the first repeat winner of the individual 20 km biathlon event, having placed first in Grenoble. Spain won first slalom skier Francisco Fernández Ochoa gold cup. American speedskaters Anne Henning and Dianne Holum made the greatest Winter Games triumph for the United States, winning two gold, one silver and one bronze respectively. Controversy over amateur status erupted three days before the Olympics, when IOC president Avery Brundage threatened to disqualify 40 funded alpine skiers and other deals. As an example, Austrian skier Karl Schranz, who earned more than $50,000 per annum from ski manufacturers, was disqualified. Meanwhile, Canada has declined to send an ice hockey team, claiming that the Communist nations 'top ice hockey teams are free to participate without restriction. Such Games are, as a historical fact, the last at which a skier has captured the gold medal using all-wooden skis. At the moment, top-level cross-country skiers used skis mostly made from synthetic fibreglass. All three women's cross-country ski contests were claimed by Galina Kulakova, who is based in the USSR. In speed skating the Dutch skater Ard Schenk has won three gold medals. Luge had his only tie in the history of the men's doubles event in Winter Olympics. The 1972 Winter Olympics featured 35 countries. The Republic of China and the Philippines were participating in their first Olympic Winters. American skater Janet Lynn won not only a bronze medal at the women's skating event, but also a huge reputation among Japanese audiences due to her free artistic programme when she featured on the cover of picture books released in Japan by "Olympic Winter Games, Sapporo 1972" and also on Japanese Television. Japan had earned a gold medal at the Winter Olympics until those events. Fans of Sapporo's host nation were excited when three Japanese competitors, led by Yukio Kasaya, swept the 70-meter gold, silver, and bronze ski jumping event; these will also be Japan's only medals to earn at these Olympics.