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What is Postpartum Depression Market and It's Market Report?

by haven smith 8 months ago in advice

Market Report

The birth of a baby can trigger a jumble of powerful emotions, from excitement and joy to fear and anxiety. Most new moms experience postpartum "baby blues" after childbirth, which commonly include mood swings, crying spells, anxiety and difficulty sleeping.

Baby blues typically begin within the first two to three days after delivery, and may last for up to two weeks. But some new moms experience a more severe, long-lasting form of depression known as postpartum depression. Rarely, an extreme mood disorder called postpartum psychosis also may develop after childbirth. Postpartum depression isn't a character flaw or a weakness. Sometimes it's simply a complication of giving birth.

Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common non-psychotic, complication of childbearing affecting approximately 10–15% of women and as such, represents a considerable public health problem affecting women and their families.

View More @ Postpartum Depression Market Research

The postnatal period is well established as an increased time of risk for the development of serious mood disorders. There are three common forms of postpartum affective illness: the blues (baby blues, maternity blues), postpartum (or postnatal) depression, and puerperal (postpartum or postnatal) psychosis each of which differs in its prevalence, clinical presentation, and management.

Postpartum depression usually begins within 1–12 months after delivery. In some women, post-partum blues simply continue and become more severe. In others, a period of wellbeing after delivery is followed by a gradual onset of depression.

The patterns of symptoms in women with postpartum depression are similar to those in women who have depression unrelated to childbirth. Several factors can lead to postpartum depression. Women with a history of depression and other mental health conditions face a higher risk of PPD.

Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common non-psychotic, complication of childbearing affecting approximately 10–15% of women and as such, represents a considerable public health problem affecting women and their families.

The postnatal period is well established as an increased time of risk for the development of serious mood disorders. There are three common forms of postpartum affective illness: the blues (baby blues, maternity blues), postpartum (or postnatal) depression, and puerperal (postpartum or postnatal) psychosis each of which differs in its prevalence, clinical presentation, and management.

Postpartum depression usually begins within 1–12 months after delivery. In some women, post-partum blues simply continue and become more severe. In others, a period of wellbeing after delivery is followed by a gradual onset of depression.

The patterns of symptoms in women with postpartum depression are similar to those in women who have depression unrelated to childbirth. Several factors can lead to postpartum depression. Women with a history of depression and other mental health conditions face a higher risk of PPD.

Women who are at risk for postpartum depression should be identified as soon as possible during pregnancy so that appropriate follow-up and care can be initiated. Risk factors for postpartum depression include depression, anxiety, stressful life events during pregnancy or the early puerperium, low levels of social support, and a personal or family history of depression. Women with a history of postpartum depression are also at increased risk of recurrence.

Screening for postpartum depression should be considered strongly, although evidence in support of universal screening tools is lacking. Patients with known risk factors may be selected for screening with the EPDS. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is a 10-item self-rated instrument that has been used widely to screen for postpartum depression.

A reasonable cut-off on the EPDS is a score of 13 or greater, even though the sensitivity and specificity vary across languages and cultures. Patients with a score of 13 or greater should be assessed for depression; however, a special note should be made of positive responses on item 10 regarding suicidal ideation.

Read More @ Postpartum Depression Market Report

advice

haven smith

https://www.delveinsight.com/

Read next: U-turn (Pt. 1)

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