family

Family can be our support system. Or they can be part of the problem. All about the complicated, loving, and difficult relationship with us and the ones who love us.

  • Mia Albel Stevenson
    Published about a month ago
    My Mum's Attempted Suicide was actually a good thing.

    My Mum's Attempted Suicide was actually a good thing.

    My mum is the most amazing woman you will ever encounter in your life. The things she has gone through will make you want to cry, and the fact that she has remained an honest, kind and loving soul throughout will make you cry harder.
  • Kathleen McGillis
    Published 2 months ago
    Psychological whiplash

    Psychological whiplash

    psychologists, psychiatrists, councillors, are all the same when it comes to mental illness. When it comes to mental disorders in children and teens, the only way to deal with it is to drug them up and hope for the best.... there are more natural options out there that have no side affects nor do the kids have to go through withdrawal symptoms if the parents can’t afford to keep up with the cost of the medication. My daughter suffers from depression and anxiety (among other things) and I’m trying to tell her dad that there are other things out there that can help her that will keep her healthy at the same time.... of course, they want proof or reading material for while their in the bathroom, that will convince them that what I’m saying is actually true. I told my ex to take our daughter off the medication, give her charcoal capsules to help her detox and I will send her what I know will help her better than that toxic crap that she was on. The problem with this whole situation is that poisons are better to push than natural remedies because there’s no money in natural remedies as there is in the pills that are being pushed. My daughter is only one of hundreds of teens out there that suffer with mental illness, what causes it, well, Trauma is a big thing, and that could mean anything from being physically hurt by someone to the divorce of parents especially when it happens while they’re still young. Forget genetics, that doesn’t always explain why these things happen, and psychologists and psychiatrists only know what they know because even they were only taught, not what they needed to know but, what others thought they should know, with the same restrictions that our children face, without even knowing it, when they go to school. Thank goodness it isn’t like the 1800’s when people were put in assylums for things like PMS or postpartum depression or just because you talked about something that scared someone and because it can’t be explained And it scared someone then you must be nuts so.... LOCK EM UP! I would have ran away with my daughter and helped her get better safely than see her go in a place like that. Not everything can be explained easily and when it comes to mental illness, there are no perfect answers but, using our children as guinnea pigs for profit is wrong in more ways than one, I’m turning 50 this year, I’m not on any medication for anything and that is how I want it to be for my children. I take a lot of health advice from my oldest daughter, why? Because she had done her research and I have no reason to doubt her, I have done some of my own as far as what will help my daughter be healthy in her mind , body and soul. I have even looked into bhuddism because I do a lot of meditation and I think all my kids would benefit greatly from that, and the study on feng shui is also another helpful tool. I know, you think “what does any of that have to do with mental health and your daughter” well, I will tell you.... when your home is not supportive or happy, mentally you start to wither, also, when your not being treated good, everything in your life will feel out of control so... get back in control, I tell her that she is the one in control and the only way I can help her is if she really wants my help. To feel better, we need to want to, not for anyone else but for ourselves. These “professionals” out there, think they know how to handle all kinds of mental health problems but the problem is they handle it the same for everyone, doesn’t matter what their age or background, the push the pills and let the families deal with the consequences or side effects of the drugs given. There is very little actual understanding when it comes to this and I’m not subjecting my daughter to it anymore.... especially when I know there are alternatives.
  • Madeline Keys
    Published 3 months ago
    Home Between Worlds
  • Life_WithMissB
    Published 3 months ago
    Bipolar -Learning to Love You Both

    Bipolar -Learning to Love You Both

    I’m not sure how to begin this one really. I am usually a very upbeat and positive person, especially on the outside. This is completely out of my comfort zone so please bare with me. Bipolar disorder continues to have such a huge impact on mine and my families life on a daily basis, so this is hard to discuss. Not because I don’t want to talk about it - far from it actually - but because the Bipolar Tree (as I like to call it) has sooo many branches, it’s really difficult to know where to start..
  • Yasmeen Dahdah
    Published 4 months ago
    SMALL BIT OF GAS LIGHTING THAT IS A BIG DEAL

    SMALL BIT OF GAS LIGHTING THAT IS A BIG DEAL

    A child asks 'why aren't we changing the channel,' or 'why are we eating this and not that,' and is given a response like 'there are no other channels that post anything else' or 'there's no other kind of food available.' A few hours later, or at any later point, the kid passes by and you're eating that thing or have changed the channel to something different they were told didn't exist.
  • Desirée Gonzalez
    Published 4 months ago
    Unpopular opinion: Family is not always everything

    Unpopular opinion: Family is not always everything

    Loyalty is the cultural basis that many people of color pride themselves on when it comes to family. In fact, it’s pervasive in many Latino, Hispanic, Italian, Black, Middle Eastern, and Asian cultures.
  • The Soul Whisperer
    Published 4 months ago
    “I didn’t realise”

    “I didn’t realise”

    The younger version of me didn’t realise. I always seemed to shrug it off as “one of those days”. I started to realise my love for sleep wasn’t out of laziness, it wasn’t solely because I was overly active that day. It was because I was emotionally and mentally drained; to the point where I just didn’t want to be awake anymore. I stayed in my room a lot, mostly because I felt the constant urge to be alone. To be away from everything. I felt even more miserable in school because I was the complete opposite of “the popular girl”. I was the quiet one and whenever I did speak it was to show I was present to the teacher taking the register. I lost my mother to her drinking problem aged 13 and I didn’t realise that played a big part until now. You always think you’re okay until you’re not. We had a very close bond. I remember never wanting to sleep in my own bed, she used to tell me that I had to sooner or later. Sooner came and she ended up actually wanting me to sleep in her bed. I’d wait for that knock to come every night. It’s sweet memories like these I long for. I used to sing to her like there was a live talent show in our living room and she’d always respond with an applaud and a warm smile. Even though I was honestly terrible at it. We used to bake shortbread biscuits and chocolate cornflake cupcakes together sometimes after I’d finish school. I’ve always had a love for cooking because of her, she let me be creative. She let me be me.
  • Sharon Shrum Kindig
    Published 5 months ago
    Typical Situation

    Typical Situation

    My son is Autistic. He is mentally challenged. The first time I had to tell someone this was when he was five years old. And I cried. I cried because in 1995 no one knew what Autism was really.
  • Sarah Seas
    Published 6 months ago
    Normy and Not the Truth

    Normy and Not the Truth

    December 18th Normy and Not the Truth
  • Tammy Correia-Guitard
    Published 6 months ago
    Living life with mental health illnesses

    Living life with mental health illnesses

    It started at the early age of 5. This feeling took over my mind and body. I was so scared but I didn’t know why. I’d run around crying and screaming for help but “Quit the crocodile tears or go to your room” was always the solution.
  • Carlene Charles
    Published 6 months ago
    Children And Young People Do Suffer With Mental Health Issues

    Children And Young People Do Suffer With Mental Health Issues

    Mental health is viewed as more significant when it happens in adults. Children need us to recognise when they are showing behaviours or thought processes that maybe related to mental health issues also.
  • Wendy
    Published 7 months ago
    2 Of My Daughters Inherited My Mental Issues

    2 Of My Daughters Inherited My Mental Issues

    In a previous article, I talked about what it was like dealing with BPD. Well in this one I am talking about 2 of my daughters.