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Pouring My Hart Out

by Cameron Kitchen about a year ago in art
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My Love For Art By Cam

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The very first thing I do is use my trusty scissors to cut my canvas before stretching it around a wood frame nice and tight. Then stabling it so it stays nice and tight.Making your own canvases is the best since you can make it whatever size you please.

I love doing art pours. I think it might be because you can never end up with one the same as the other. There’s no way you could ever make two pours identical ever. So it’s really neat to see the outcome of every painting.There are no rules to pouring or any given techniques to do it.You can actually come up with new ideas as you go like I said there are no rules with art.

I think it’s so cool all the colours you can use it even can predict the kind of mood your in by the colours you end up using.All the bright colours usually hints toward the happier side and darks for more mad or upset .You can mix different mediums for different effects . Like mixing your paint with silicone and just normal White glue and water also isopropanol all of them do something different with the paint and create different cells big and small. When you get a bunch of tiny cells it looks like an intricate spiderweb of colour I think it’s just hypnotizing to watch because the paint just settles and it will always look different by the time it dries it’s truly remarkable. You can have crazy bright colours and ,then have all kinds of cells in your painting then finish it with art resin which just intensifies the colour and makes your painting have a glass finish to it and it also protects you’re painting.It’s almost like putting a magnifying glass up to your painting and you can see all the crazy detail the detail being the cells.

Anything you do and try will make your pour look different like pouring the paint out close to the canvas or far away from the canvas or flipping the cup of paint over onto the canvas or even pouring the paint through a strainer or putting a piece of string on the canvas before pouring the paint and pulling the string off , all these little things make a different design. That’s the greatest thing about it there is no wrong way to do a pour .I think the one thing that makes them really neat that you need to figure out on your own is mixing the mediums together but that comes with practising and just trial and error . I actually measure all the mediums I mix together and write down the effect I got because there’s no way to try and get the same sort of effect without recording it otherwise you’re just free handing all the mediums and good luck trying to make the medium the same ever again. Also another thing that makes a big difference is what colour you use as a base colour White and black being the most used can make your poor look 100% different it’s just never ending the things you can change for a pour and you don’t even need to really be a great artist you just have to be willing to get a little messy and do a little cleanup that’s all. It’s also very relaxing and a really neat hobby once you’ve tried it ,it’s hard to stop making canvases because they just looks so neat if you haven’t done it I recommend at least trying it at least once. One of my favourite paintings I ever did was a pour and I don’t think I sell it for $3000 just because at that time I wasn’t recording the mediums I mixed.The cells and the colours were absolutely amazing.

I think you can almost tell the mood the artist was in by the colours used that’s why I called this pouring my heart out it was just appropriate I thought.

art

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Cameron Kitchen

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