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The Haunting of Hill House: A true story of the events that inspired the novel

The True Story of the Borley Rectory Haunting that Inspired the Classic Novel.

By Zaenal ArifinPublished about a year ago 3 min read
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The Haunting of Hill House: A true story of the events that inspired the novel
Photo by Nathan Anderson on Unsplash

The Haunting of Hill House is a novel by Shirley Jackson, first published in 1959. The story is about a group of people who spend a summer in a haunted house, and the strange occurrences that take place there. The novel is considered to be one of the greatest works of horror fiction of the 20th century, and it has been adapted into several films and television series.

The events that inspired the novel were based on a real-life investigation of a haunted house in the 1940s. The house, known as the "Borley Rectory," was located in the village of Borley in Essex, England. The house had a reputation for being haunted, and in 1929, the Daily Mirror newspaper sent a reporter to investigate the claims. The reporter, Harry Price, was a well-known investigator of the paranormal, and he spent several months living in the house, recording his observations.

Price's investigation revealed that the house was indeed haunted, and he documented a wide range of strange phenomena, such as ghostly apparitions, mysterious footsteps, and objects that would move on their own. The most famous ghostly figure that was reported was the ghost of a nun who was said to have been seen wandering the grounds of the house.

Price's investigation also revealed that the house had a dark history. It was built on the site of a 13th-century monastery, and it was believed that the ghosts of the monks who had once lived there were still present. The house had also been the site of a number of tragic events, including the deaths of several members of the family who had lived there.

In 1936, Price published a book about his investigation, called "The Most Haunted House in England." The book was a best-seller, and it brought the Borley Rectory to the attention of the public. The house became a popular tourist attraction, and people from all over the country came to visit.

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However, in 1939, the house was destroyed by fire, and the strange occurrences came to an end. The house was rebuilt, but it was never again the site of any supernatural activity.

In the years that followed, there were many theories about the Borley Rectory and the strange occurrences that had taken place there. Some people believed that the house was truly haunted, while others suggested that the events had been caused by some sort of psychological phenomenon.

Shirley Jackson was one of the many people who were fascinated by the Borley Rectory, and she used the story of the house as the basis for her novel "The Haunting of Hill House." The novel was published in 1959, and it has since become a classic of horror fiction.

It's important to note that some of the events and facts of the story were disputed and some investigators believe that Harry Price was a fraud. However, the fact is, the house still exists and has a mysterious history that still fascinate people.

In conclusion, The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson was inspired by a true story of events that took place in Borley Rectory, a haunted house in Essex, England. The story of the house and its haunting has been the subject of much debate, with some believing it to be truly haunted and others suggesting that it was caused by some sort of psychological phenomenon. Despite the skepticism, the story of the Borley Rectory continues to be a source of fascination and intrigue for many people.

Thank you for reading, If any of you have read this novel, please provide feedback about this novel.

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About the Creator

Zaenal Arifin

I am a person who likes to write and want to channel my hobby by writing.

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