60s music

Groove along to Beat Media's breakdown of the bands, artists, songs and culture that defined the 60s.

  • Rasma Raisters
    Published about a year ago
    Somebody to Love

    Somebody to Love

    The title refers to a classic song from the 1960s sung by the American rock band Jefferson Airplane, who became known as hippie revolutionaries.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published about a year ago
    Rocking Around the Clock with Bill Haley and the Comets

    Rocking Around the Clock with Bill Haley and the Comets

    Bill Haley and the Comets rolled out some of the greatest rock and roll hits from when they were founded in 1952 to the time of Haley’s death in 1981. This American rock group put nine singles on the Top 20. Bill Haley began his career as a country music singer.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published about a year ago
    Gary Puckett and the Union Gap

    Gary Puckett and the Union Gap

    Another American rock group which came on the scene in the late 1960s was Gary Puckett and the Union Gap. This band was set apart from other bands due to their music. They had songs which had a combination of great singing and music and touched the heart in many different ways. Their songs are still popular to this day and can be heard over the radio. From the very beginning, they were known as The Union Gap featuring Garry Puckett, and later on with only Puckett’s name in front. I can honestly say that their incredible music took me in my teen years from being a young girl to becoming a woman.
  • Rowan Fay
    Published 2 years ago
    Innovation Is the Key to Musical Success

    Innovation Is the Key to Musical Success

    The Beatles remain one of the most critically acclaimed bands of all time. Their emergence in the 1960s defined the entire era, and their success and longevity can be summed up by one thing: consistent innovation.
  • Gregory Segal
    Published 2 years ago
    Can God's Music Rock as Much as the Devil's?

    Can God's Music Rock as Much as the Devil's?

    When you think of Rock & Roll, Psychedelia, and the Hippy movement of the 1960s, Christianity is a term that one would be unlikely to associate. Although a multitude of faiths were adopted by artists during this period, from George Harrison's devotion to the Hare Krishna's & Paramahansa Yogananda, Cat (Yusuf Islam) Stevens' conversion to Islam, or the Paganistic undertones of Pentangle, Christianity's influence on music is largely unconsidered. Despite acts such as Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, and Don McLean being prominent men of the Christian faith during this time, their religious leanings have become rather overshadowed by their own celebrity.
  • Shandi Pace
    Published 2 years ago
    1968: Rock ’n’ Roll’s Triumphant Year

    1968: Rock ’n’ Roll’s Triumphant Year

    The year 1967 represented a cultural shift in music that would continue far past its 365 days. Turning the page onto a new year, 1968 was different. Multiple musicians that ruled the “Summer of Love” still found popular success throughout the coming year. Artists like The Beatles, The Doors, Jimi Hendrix, Big Brother and the Holding Company, and The Rolling Stones all remained in the mainstream yet each allowed for change that was necessary.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 2 years ago
    Light My Fire

    Light My Fire

    One of the most revolutionary bands of the 1960s was The Doors. Like other bands that skyrocketed to stardom and popularity, they had a vocalist that was dynamite – Jim Morrison. Like other such vocalists, unfortunately, in time Morrison discovered what it was like to climb to the top of the pedestal only to come tumbling down the hard way. He pushed himself to the limit mixing drugs with alcohol and hard living. Six years passed from the time of the formation of the band in 1966 to the death of Morrison in 1971. During that time they released six studio albums.
  • Steve Trower
    Published 2 years ago
    Kinkology, Part 1: 'Kinks'

    Kinkology, Part 1: 'Kinks'

    It has been a subject of lengthy debate over the years: "Stones or Beatles?"—usually asked as if those are the only two bands of note to have formed in 60s Britain. Yet, somewhere in the wake of these two greats, an obscure little four-piece named, The Ravens formed in North London, and went on to become one of the most underrated of British pop groups.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 2 years ago
    Blood, Sweat, & Tears

    Blood, Sweat, & Tears

    Blood, Sweat & Tears is an American group known for playing contemporary jazz-rock from the late 1960s to the early 1970s. They recorded songs which were written by well-known rock and folk songwriters such as James Taylor and Billie Holiday. They came together in 1967 in New York City and made a mix of music which included rock, blues, pop, horn arrangements, and improvised jazz.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 2 years ago
    "Stop in the Name of Love"

    "Stop in the Name of Love"

    The Supremes was an American female singing group that came out with lots of memorable hits. They were at the top of the acts with Motown Records during the 1960s. The Supremes had a likable and bouncy sound and had 12 number one songs on the Billboard Hot 100. The Supremes originally began as the Primettes in Detroit, Michigan back in 1951. In the mid-1960s when they were on top, the Supremes actually rivaled The Beatles for popularity around the globe. It was their great success which paved the way for future R&B and soul musicians to gain popularity.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 2 years ago
    Songs with Soul and Inspiration

    Songs with Soul and Inspiration

    Back in the mid-1960s, a popular duo on the music scene was The Righteous Brothers. What was interesting about them was that they were not really brothers they were Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield both born in 1941. They had a great singing style and one of their well-known songs was “(You’re My) Soul and Inspiration”from 1966.
  • Rasma Raisters
    Published 2 years ago
    The Amazing Talent of Simon & Garfunkel

    The Amazing Talent of Simon & Garfunkel

    Like being born under a lucky star, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel discovered that they had the talent to harmonize as early as the sixth grade. At that time, they lived and played in Forest Hills, Queens, New York City. When they became a duo, they wove their magic creating incredible melodies and songs in the late 1960s and early 1970s.