5 Financial Tips for Teens

Practical Money Management Advice for the Young Adults in Your Life

5 Financial Tips for Teens

When it comes to economics, many teens’ mouths write checks their knowledge can’t cash. Help influence the financial literacy of a teen in your life with these practical money-management tips.

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(Family Features) When it comes to economics, many teens' mouths write checks their knowledge can't cash.

While 93% of American teens say they know how the economy works, 29% have had no economic schooling, according to a survey of 1,000 US teens ages 13–18 by Wakefield Research on behalf of Junior Achievement and the Charles Koch Foundation. Even in light of their false confidence, teens are aware of the importance of financial education.

Although the study identified numerous gaps in economic and financial knowledge, it also showed teens do know where to look for credible information. Two-thirds (67%) recognize they should use their school as a resource.

"One of the things we hear often is that some textbooks are written too academically for most students to understand the concepts," said Jack E. Kosakowski, president and CEO of Junior Achievement USA. "Our programs, which work as a complement to the school curriculum, are written from the perspective of today's teens and use digital content to help bring economic concepts to life for students."

Beyond the classroom, another 63% of students believe they should use their parents as resources for economics education. Help influence the financial literacy of a teen in your life with these practical money-management tips adapted from the curriculum.

Set goals

Managing your money is more meaningful when you're doing it with purpose. This might mean budgeting to ensure you have enough money to maintain your auto insurance and keep gas in your car, or you may be saving for a big senior trip. Knowing what you want to achieve with your money can help you plan how you spend it more wisely.

Weigh needs vs. wants

When you begin making your own money, it's easier to indulge your own wishes and spend money on things you don't necessarily need. To some extent, that's not a bad thing; rewarding yourself is fine when you do so within reason. That means not exceeding your available funds, and not forsaking things you truly need, like gas money to get to and from a job or school.

Get a debit card

Most people find that having cash on hand makes it easier to spend. If you use a debit card instead, you're an extra step away from spending so you have a little more time to consider your purchase. Another benefit of a debit card is it helps track your purchases in real time so you can keep constant tabs on your balance and ensure you don't overdraft your account.

Start a savings habit

Even if your income doesn't allow for much, it's a good idea to get in the habit of setting aside a portion of each check. It may only be $10, but over time each $10 deposit can build your account toward a long-range goal.

Photo by Glen Carrie on Unsplash

Protect your privacy

Teens who've grown up in the digital age tend to be less skeptical and cautious about privacy matters than their elder counterparts. It's important that young people understand the potential impact of failing to protect their privacy when it comes to financial matters, including the possibility that their identities could be stolen and all of their money siphoned away. Teaching kids about security is an essential lesson in economics.

Photo by Eliott Reyna on Unsplash

Visit ja.org for more tips and information to help raise your teen's financial literacy.

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personal finance
David Wyld
David Wyld
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David Wyld

Professor, Consultant, Doer. Founder/Publisher of The IDEA Publishing (http://www.theideapublishing.com/) & Modern Business Press (http://www.modernbusinesspress.com)

See all posts by David Wyld