career

Career soldiers are the mainstay of any army; who are these brave patriots that lay down their lives for a living? And what do they do post-combat life?

  • Patrick Boniface
    Published 2 years ago
    Aerial Combat Ace: Erich Hartmann

    Aerial Combat Ace: Erich Hartmann

    During the Second World War, Allied pilots came to know of Erich Hartmann through his daring and his skill as a fighter pilot. Such was his status that his comrades called him Bubi, but to the Soviets he hunted and destroyed he was known simply as ‘The Black Devil’. Hartmann’s successes in the air have become legendary. He flew 1,404 combat missions and is credited with shooting down 352 Allied planes making him the most successful ace in the history of aerial warfare.
  • Adrian Scott
    Published 3 years ago
    10 of the Best Military Schools in the US

    10 of the Best Military Schools in the US

    Each of these schools being unique in nature, they all provide the education needed for their cadets to succeed in their future endeavors with the military. Teaching teamwork, disciple, goal achievement, integrity, and honor, these military schools are structured establishments meant to push those enrolled both physically and mentally.
  • Lorraine Woiak
    Published 3 years ago
    One Video, One Life Forever Changed

    One Video, One Life Forever Changed

    Music has been a part of my life since I was little. However, I did not realize that music really was my life until I was headed in a direction I never thought I would be. As a musician, I am often asked what my favorite song is or what has been my greatest inspiration. Any true music lover will tell you that it is impossible to choose just one song. My greatest inspiration came from a place many would not expect and led me to a path no one could predict...
  • Rowan Marley
    Published 3 years ago
    Benefits of Being a Military Officer

    Benefits of Being a Military Officer

    Most people are very well-aware of the fact that Navy SEALs get paid well, and that military members all get great health benefits. The military is very good to its members and is pretty notorious for acting like a brotherhood.
  • Cato Conroy
    Published 3 years ago
    Things All Recruits Should Know Before Becoming a Sniper
  • Brian Taylor
    Published 3 years ago
    Handling Finances in the Military — A Personal Account

    Handling Finances in the Military — A Personal Account

    Whenever you think of what life is like in the military, what comes to mind first? Is it the assumed thrill of a firefight? Perhaps the excitement of seeing massive explosions? Or maybe you simply think of the travel? Those that serve in the military will oftentimes tell you that what comes to mind for them first is payday, specifically the 1st and 15th of every month. Of course, when we do receive that highly sought after paycheck, we find that there never seems to be enough zeros at the end of our checks — only zeros in our bank accounts. Why is that?
  • Katie Berkenpas
    Published 3 years ago
    You Can't Control Everything

    You Can't Control Everything

    When I was a junior in high school, I decided that I wanted to join the military. My family was more than a little hesitant at first. I had previously wanted to be a veterinarian, and they couldn't understand why I wasn't seeing my potential. I knew deep down that this is what I wanted to do. I wanted to be a part of "the 1%." I had been recruited by the Navy Seals and the Army at this point. I set my sights elsewhere. I decided that I was going to join the Air Force. At the young age of 17, I sat down face to face with a recruiter and signed the dotted line. From that day forward, all of my attention was focused on the day I would ship out to basic training. I prepared myself physically, mentally, and spiritually. I was in the gym working out for no less than 90 minutes a day. I was talking to every service member I could find, learning all the tricks of the trade to have a step up on other recruits. When my ship-out day finally arrived, I knew that I was ready. I flew out from my hometown and arrived in San Antonio, Texas on July 26, 2016. The air was buzzing with anticipation and anxiety from each recruit wondering what was waiting for us. The minute the bus stopped we were rushed off and set to a task. I was assigned to a dormitory with 50 other women. I kept my head low, talked to few people, and simply did what I was there to do. I worked hard, and eight weeks later I graduated from basic training. One week later I was bussed to the base where I would be trained to do my job. I sat in a classroom for eight hours a day for a month before being pulled from my assigned course. This wasn't uncommon in my field, but was still a little worrisome. Most people pulled from their course returned to class within a month. I however was still not in class at my six-month mark. I was assigned to work in the front office with the sergeants of my squadrons dormitory. I handled all accountability for 500+ airman everyday as well as mandatory office work. I enjoyed my job working with the sergeants. I grew closer with them everyday, especially my flight chief. His name was Technical Sergeant Henry. He was a serious man, tough on his airmen, but you could see that he cared for each and every one of them. He became my mentor. We talked often about my struggles, and about my career. I worked with him in the front office for eight months before learning that the commander was planning on discharging me. I fought this discharge for four more months before learning that there was nothing I could do. I separated on July 21, 2017. My world crumbled. I felt like I had lost all purpose and direction. How could this happen to me? Everyone that knew the details of my situation knew what was happening to me was completely unfair, but still I was left helpless. I was angry and bitter at the way my military career had come to an end. Everything I had worked so hard for amounted to nothing. I couldn't imagine waking up and not putting on my uniform as I had done everyday before. I struggled with depression, and began drinking. I couldn't go home and face my parents. I didn't want people that I grew up with prying into my life asking about what had happened. I stayed in Texas for five more months working at a bar. My life continued to become more and more chaotic the more that I drank and surrounded myself with people who were drinking. Then about six months after my discharge I ran into a sergeant that I had worked with in the front office. We sat down and talked for an hour about me and how I was doing. I explained everything to him, and what he had to say hit me. He told me that my life was just beginning. What was the point in staying stuck on the past. It was over and there was nothing I could do now to change it. I had the chance to experience it, but life had something else in store for me. I had so much potential if only I would get over myself. His words although harsh spoke a lot of truth. He made me realize that I couldn't control everything that happened, nor what people thought about me, and pushed me to go on with my life. I let go of all the pain and hurt I had been feeling, and instead focused my energy on my relationships. I moved back with my parents and started working on a new career. Life has its hills and valleys. I changed my focus from preventing problems in life to dealing with them in stride. This was by far the hardest lesson that I had to learn, but now I feel like I can conquer anything.
  • Annie Kiely
    Published 3 years ago
    Top National Guard Jobs

    Top National Guard Jobs

    If you're looking for a change in career, it may not have occured to you to seek out work through the National Guard. If you aren't seeking active miliatary work, it can seem like a dead end. But, you may not have considered the number of opportnities being made available through these forces. No matter what career you've been considering, the National Guard may be able to help get you there. Within a year, you could be taking advantage of the education and financial benefits of training within the National Guard. Whether you're looking to develop your current career, or get started in something new, the military provides the benefits, education, and future opportunities to make it an attractive option.
  • Jake Pine
    Published 3 years ago
    What Does the National Guard Do?

    What Does the National Guard Do?

    The Army National Guard is made up of citizen-soldiers who train part time and close to home, preparing for when they'll be needed. "Weekend warrior" can be a derogative term, but there is nothing funny about what the National Guard does for our country.
  • Cato Conroy
    Published 3 years ago
    What to Know About the Air National Guard

    What to Know About the Air National Guard

    If you want to serve in the United States military, then you might be considering joining the National Guard. The National Guard has two main factions—the regular National Guard, and the Air National Guard.
  • Mike Mavenful
    Published 3 years ago
    Pros and Cons of the National Guard

    Pros and Cons of the National Guard

    A military career is something many of us have considered in passing. We've wondered if it's the right choice for us, if it can provide as well as people say it will, and possibly if it's actually something that would mesh well with the personalities and values we have.
  • Cato Conroy
    Published 3 years ago
    How Much Does the National Guard Pay?

    How Much Does the National Guard Pay?

    The National Guard is one of the largest military branches in the United States, and it's also one of the most flexible in terms of scheduling. People who want to join the military often choose the National Guard because of its flexibility — but that can come with a price.