bipolar

Bipolar disorder; understanding the highs, the lows and the in between.

  • Heather Troutman
    Published 2 months ago
    My Story of Redemption Part II

    My Story of Redemption Part II

    1997 I met the man that I would marry. I have continued to go undiagnosed. Although I continued drinking, I was no longer doing drugs. I started to substitute cutting for the drugs. We dated for two years before getting married. It was not an easy relationship. Everyone has issues but I don't think he realized how deep mine ran. He loved me, though, even through the drinking. After we were married things were great for a few years. I got pregnant early on so my drinking stopped. We had a baby about every two years from 2000 - 2005. After my last baby I went into a depression. My doctors figured it was postpartum depression so the medication they prescribed was short term. So I felt better for a little while. I started focusing all my attention on raising the kids. What I couldn't realize at the time was that I was in a manic period. Mania can be just as destructive as depression. I felt like I could do anything and was having black outs. I would go shopping and when I got home, have no idea what I had bought. This seems strange but I was having dissociative episodes and had no control over what was happening. Then a major change to our lives pushed me back into depression. My husband started attending a school three hours away that he had to stay at all week. He would only be able to come home on the weekends. So we made the decision to move so his commute would be a little bit shorter. I started drinking again. I was bouncing between mania and depression. I had what was called rapid cycling. I put further strain on our marriage with drinking during depression and spending in mania and the constant self-harm. Around this time I was officially diagnosed with bipolar disorder. I went on several medications. I started experiencing side effects, including extreme fatigue. It was not an easy time with four young children, side effects and not having my husband at home. After a year of ups and downs, he graduated. Part of his new career required that we move to a new area. We had no choice but to leave family and friends behind. This increased my depression and the strain on our marriage. My husband had no idea how far I had fallen. One night he was out on night shift and I decided that I couldn't continue. I had nothing left and only saw one way out. I got drunk and tried, once again, to take my life. It was my youngest child that saved me. She got up to use the bathroom and needed my help. There was no way I was going to let her see me like that. Since I was quite intoxicated, I couldn't remember my husband's cell phone number. So I dialed 911 and explained the situation. Everyone came....police, fire, ambulance. It was complete chaos. No one could find my husband so they were preparing the kids to go with someone. Then as they were loading me in the ambulance he came home. He was extremely confused and kept trying to get in the ambulance with me. I screamed at him to leave me alone and go help the kids. After I sobered up at the hospital I was admitted to my first psychiatric hospital. It took them about two months to get my medicine where it needed to be. Once I was discharged, I did not immediately go home as our marriage had not improved during this time. We spent about a month apart. During this time I did a lot of self reflection. I began to realize how much was happening in my mind. I also knew that running from my marriage was not the answer. So I went home. I felt like I was getting somewhere with my health. The process to accepting my diagnoses had started. We were ready to work on our marriage and my health. The problem was that I was very timid and not very knowledgeable about bipolar disorder. Whatever the psychiatrist suggested, I did. That was a big mistake. He started over medicating me. I slept all the time. My routine was get up, move to the couch and sleep some more. My husband had to work, take care of four young kids, run the house and take care of me. On my good days I knew something had to change. I realized I was over medicated. So instead of talking to the doctor........I just quit taking my medications. I don't EVER recommend this. I fell into a very dark hole. During this fall I tried to take my life once more and ended up back in a hospital. When I was able to be released, I once again felt like I was getting somewhere. My medications were working and we were working on our marriage. It was at this point that I returned to church and my relationship with God. My husband and I were baptized in a local lake. We felt renewal in our marriage and I felt renewal in myself. We made the decision to move back to the area around our friends and family. This was one of the best decisions we ever made.....
  • kellie dougherty
    Published 3 months ago
    What you don't know about bipolar disorder.
  • Celiina Peltzer
    Published 3 months ago
    Bipolar

    Bipolar

    Today I’m lying in bed and just thinking. About what? ... EVERYTHING. Every little thing. Good things, bad things, life, dreams, goals, hope, fears, memories, future, everything. I don’t like overthinking things but I do it anyway. I don’t like sitting in bed doing nothing but I do it anyway. I don’t like feeling down so often and not socialising with people I love, but I do it anyway. I’m not sure why, and where this feeling comes from..- I think I’m bipolar.
  • Jasmin
    Published 4 months ago
    Relationships & BPD.

    Relationships & BPD.

    Never would I of thought that my borderline personality disorder, or emotionally unstable personality disorder as the doctors officially diagnosed me with would of ever worked within a romantic relationship. Growing up it was something in which I had always struggled with, relationships!
  • Tosha Maaks
    Published 4 months ago
    My Struggle With Bipolar Disorder
  • Antoinette Kite
    Published 4 months ago
    I CAN'T WALK AWAY FROM THIS

    I CAN'T WALK AWAY FROM THIS

    There are people on this earth who swear they really know me. They’ve known me for at least five years or more and they’ve partied with me a majority of those years. Partying with me means drinking. Drinking with me means seeing the best (inebriated) version of me and that’s the one that keeps people around. My Bipolar Disorder (type II) has been a part of my life for the past eighteen years.
  • Hadi Karaki
    Published 5 months ago
    My Manic Confessions

    My Manic Confessions

    Share a personal experience where you learned something about mental health. This could be a time when your mind was changed, when you realized something important, or when you learned something useful
  • Miranda Jaensch
    Published 5 months ago
    Becoming Okay With Being Bipolar

    Becoming Okay With Being Bipolar

    Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a mental health disorder that is identified by the severe highs (known as mania) and lows (known as depression) in mood, affecting and causing changes in sleep, energy, cognition and thinking, and behaviour. There are two types of bipolar, type one and two, that are distinguished by the severity of the opposing moods. Those diagnosed with type two, like me, suffer only moderate highs called hypomania, though both mania and hypomania feature symptoms such as irritability, reckless behaviour(s), and risky, impulsive decision-making. Most people with bipolar disorder spend more time dealing with depressive moods than manic or hypomanic symptoms, but it can be debilitating when enduring symptoms of either of the two "poles". The time between the peaks in mood swings is relatively normal for those living with bipolar, which can lead others around the diagnosed to doubt or become frustrated with their seeming on-again-off-again attitude. There is no definitive cause for bipolar - though genes, stress, and brain changes are all considered factors. There is no limitation to those who may be and can be affected by it. Bipolar disorder is usually triggered in adolescence/young adulthood and can be hereditary in families. While both men and women are equally likely to become affected by it, women are more likely to experience rapid cycling (four or more mood episodes within a year) and also, on average, spend more time in depressive states than male counterparts. Many people with the condition abuse alcohol or other drugs when manic or depressed, though this is more prevalent with men, while others also have a significant change (either an increase or decrease) in their sex drive and sexual decisions overall. People with bipolar disorder are more likely to have seasonal depression, co-existing anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
  • Hannah Adele
    Published 5 months ago
    What it's like to have Bipolar Disorder
  • Tosha Maaks
    Published 6 months ago
    Good Enough
  • Heather Troutman
    Published 6 months ago
    My Story of Redemption Part I

    My Story of Redemption Part I

    This journey starts long before I was diagnosed. As a teenager, I had always felt off. Not bad or crazy - just off. I felt like I was on the outskirts of society. Friends did not come easy to me. I didn't seem to be able to communicate well. It was like my mind and my mouth just wouldn't line up. I had so many emotions all the time. Anxiety, depression, paranoia. I couldn't seem to distinguish them. All my emotions would hit me at once. I just didn't know how to handle them. This sensation continued throughout high school and past graduation. Even though I had trouble with friends, I enjoyed a very close relationship with my family. I am the oldest of four children and have two wonderful parents. So when I graduated, I decided to attend college close to my home. I thought that life would be different at college. I was sure I would "find myself". Things were different but just not how I had thought. I had a wonderful roommate and it seemed my luck with friends was changing. So I felt that I could do anything because I now had friends. Now what I found out was my roommate had connections....connections to parties. So I started drinking. At first it was just for fun. Then I realized that drinking numbed my thoughts and emotions. I didn't have to fight my feelings when I was drinking. So it became a lifestyle. I would start the day with beer and end it with shots. I didn't realize I was becoming an alcoholic. Then drinking led to other things. Smoking, drugs and eventually petty theft. (I am not saying that all drinking is bad, nor am I saying that drinking always leads to more. This is just what happened to me in the mental state I was in.) I thought this was great. I was enjoying myself and not fighting my emotions. The thing was, deep inside, I knew something was wrong. I started distancing myself from my family. I wasn't attending any of my classes. So started the spiral. I didn't like what I was doing but I couldn't stop. If I stopped drinking and getting high, then I would have to fight all the thoughts and emotions flying through my head. So I kept going with this lifestyle but started to not enjoy it. I started hating myself and everything I did. I....just....couldn't.....stop. Then came the night it all fell apart. I was laying in bed, in the dark, crying. Nothing was right. I didn't know what to do. I didn't know where to go. My parents could have helped but I had completely alienated them. So I thought I found the answer. A dull razor blade. I laid there trying to cut myself with an old razor blade. Then my roommate came in. She saw what I was doing and ran to find someone to help. When she left, I ran. I went out a back door of the dorm and ran. Unfortunately it was raining and I was in my pajamas. I heard police sirens coming and decided I needed to hide. I thought if I just hid for a while, everyone would forget about me and leave. I obviously was not thinking straight. I had also lost the blade in my rush to leave. I found a small back porch on one of the dorms. It was wooden slats with a small staircase. It didn't keep the rain off of me completely but at least it was somewhere to hide. I spent most of that night under those stairs in the mud. I couldn't even end my life successfully. As it was nearing dawn, things seemed to quiet down. I took a look around and couldn't see any people or police cars. So I made my way back to my dorm. As I entered the lobby it was very quiet. I thought I was safe now. I could go back to my dorm and act like nothing happened. Then off to my right I saw movement. It was my roommate and a police officer. There was nowhere to go. I was too tired to run again and just didn't have any fight left in me. They took me to the hospital to be evaluated. Once it was determined I was okay, I thought this was the end of it and I could go back. Like I said my mind was out of control at this point. They gave me two options. They would either admit my to the psychiatric hospital, or I could call my parents and go home with them. This was a very difficult decision. Obviously I did not want to go into a hospital but I had distanced myself from my family. In the end, I always knew I could go home. So I called my Dad. I just told him I was okay but needed to be picked up at the hospital. So he came. I couldn't say anything, I just showed him my wrist. He cried and hugged me. It was obvious that he didn't know what to say or do. He drove me home and the ride was very quiet. He must have been embarrassed somewhat because he didn't tell my Mom what happened. I went to bed and He told my Mom I was sick. Later that week my parents went back to the dorm and got all my things. I spent a week in bed. I just slept. This is the beginning of my journey but it is not the end. This was the first time I tried to end my life but it would not be the last.......
  • Dahlia Baerga
    Published 6 months ago
    I Was Misdiagnosed for Years

    I Was Misdiagnosed for Years

    When I was a child, I was extremely happy and energetic. My mom and grandmother will tell you that I bounced all over the place. I loved to read, I loved to play, and I loved watching and helping my grandmother in the kitchen. I had my ups and downs, but who doesn’t? Nothing ever seemed out of the ordinary. In middle school, though, things seemed to change a little bit. I went to a different school than my friends, and these new kids were not as nice or as kind to me. The way I had made friends in the past didn’t seem to work as well as it had before. It threw me for a loop, but I kept working and getting good grades.