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The minute-by-minute effects of cannabis on the human body

This is what cannabis does to your body minute by minute

By Jacob DamianPublished 4 months ago 7 min read
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Cannabis has been debated for years, and is still classified as a class B substance across the nation. This implies that being caught with it may result in up to five years in jail and/or a £2,500 fine.

The way cannabis affects you might vary depending on a number of things. If you want to feel the affects of marijuana quickly, smoking it is your best option, as opposed to taking an edible. The effects of cannabis may vary from person to person based on a number of factors, including age, height, weight, and tolerance.

  • But here's a summary of the minute-by-minute impacts of cannabis:

It has been claimed that cannabinoids have a broad variety of effects on both the body and the psyche of those who consume them. There is a possibility that this will have an effect on the immune system, eyesight, circulation, breathing, memory, and decision-making.

The flower of the cannabis plant is collected for harvesting because of the psychotropic and medicinal characteristics it has. The stalk or stem of the cannabis plant is further processed for commercial use (such as in the production of hemp fibre). The cannabis plant produces a number of consumable and helpful byproducts, including hemp seed and hemp oil.

Cannabis is known by a number of other names as well, including "pot," "weed," and "dozens."

The most common ways that people take cannabis are by smoking it or using vaporizers, but it may also be ingested, applied topically, or mixed into beverages.

The effects of cannabis may be altered by different methods of consumption. When you smoke cannabis, the components of the plant enter your lungs and then go via your blood to your brain and other organs, bypassing the digestive system. It might take anything from a few seconds to a few minutes for the effects to begin to take effect.

When cannabis is consumed in any form, the body goes through a series of physiological changes that include the digestive system, the liver, and lastly the circulation. It might take minutes or even hours before you feel anything at all.

It has been claimed that cannabinoids have a broad variety of effects on both the body and the psyche of those who consume them. There is a possibility that this will have an effect on the immune system, eyesight, circulation, breathing, memory, and decision-making.

The flower of the cannabis plant is collected for harvesting because of the psychotropic and medicinal characteristics it has. The stalk or stem of the cannabis plant is further processed for commercial use (such as in the production of hemp fibre). The cannabis plant produces a number of consumable and helpful byproducts, including hemp seed and hemp oil.

Cannabis is known by a number of other names as well, including "pot," "weed," and "dozens."

The most common ways that people take cannabis are by smoking it or using vaporizers, but it may also be ingested, applied topically, or mixed into beverages.

The effects of cannabis may be altered by different methods of consumption. When you smoke cannabis, the components of the plant enter your lungs and then go via your blood to your brain and other organs, bypassing the digestive system. It might take anything from a few seconds to a few minutes for the effects to begin to take effect.

When cannabis is consumed in any form, the body goes through a series of physiological changes that include the digestive system, the liver, and lastly the circulation. It might take minutes or even hours before you feel anything at all.

There are short-term and long-term impacts of cannabis usage, including altered perception and elevated heart rate. Long-term cannabis usage has been linked to a higher risk of persistent cough and other health problems.

Cannabis has both short- and long-term effects, depending on the individual's tolerance, dosage, and frequency of usage.

It is more vital than ever to be aware of the potential side effects of using cannabis as its availability grows throughout the United States and the rest of the globe. Take a look below to learn how it influences your body in detail.

  • Physiology of breathing

Smoking cannabis, like smoking tobacco, may irritate your bronchi and lungs due to the presence of a number of harmful compounds, such as ammonia and hydrogen cyanide.

Regular smokers are more prone to have breathing problems such wheezing, coughing, and mucus production. Bronchitis and other lung illnesses are also more likely to strike you. Asthma and cystic fibrosis are only two of the respiratory diseases that cannabis use has the potential to make worse.

The toxins included in cannabis smoking have been hypothesised to enhance the likelihood of developing lung cancer.

However, there is no proof that cannabis smoking causes lung cancer, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) . More study is required.

  • The cardiovascular system

When inhaled, THC enters the bloodstream and travels to all parts of the body. Your heart rate may speed up by 20 to 50 bpm in a matter of minutes. You can maintain that heart rate for up to three hours.

Because of this, your heart will need more oxygen. This may increase your chance of experiencing a heart attack if you already have heart problems.

Bloodshot eyes are a common symptom of recent cannabis usage. Because cannabis causes blood vessels to dilate and fill with more blood, the eyes seem red.

Additionally, THC has been shown to reduce intraocular pressure, which may temporarily alleviate glaucoma symptoms. THC may provide long-term advantages for glaucoma, although this is not yet known and requires further study.

  • The Brain and Spinal Cord

Cannabinoids in cannabis have an impact on the whole CNS. It's widely believed that cannabinoids in cannabis reduce pain and inflammation and prevent spasms and seizures. However, there could be some harmful impacts on the central nervous system down the road.

Dopamine, the brain's natural "feel good" neurotransmitter, is released in enormous quantities in response to THC. That stuff is what really makes you feel good. It might make you more aware of the passage of time and enhance your other senses.

As much as 30% of regular cannabis users may eventually develop a dependency on the drug, and this dopamine cycle may be a key factor in why. While cases of severe cannabis use disorder or addiction are infrequent, they do happen.

Possible withdrawal symptoms from cannabis use include:

irritability

insomnia

lack of hunger

Because of the way THC affects the hippocampus, it might cloud one's judgement. Since the hippocampus plays a role in memory, it might be challenging to create new memories when high.

The basal ganglia and cerebellum also go through certain changes. Movement and equilibrium are governed by these brain regions. Your reflexes, balance, and coordination might all be affected by cannabis. Because of these alterations, driving is now unsafe.

There may be a link between cannabis usage and mental health issues including sadness and anxiety, and very high dosages of cannabis or high concentrations of THC may create hallucinations or delusions.

If you or a family member have schizophrenia, it may be best to abstain from cannabis. People with a genetic predisposition may have worsened symptoms or an increased risk of acquiring the illness if they use cannabis.

You can feel fatigued or melancholy after coming down from the high. Anxiety is a side effect for some individuals who use cannabis.

Long-term cannabis usage may have serious negative effects on thinking and memory in those under the age of 25 whose brains are still developing.

The effects of cannabis on an unborn child are not limited to the mother. The kid could struggle with things like remembering things, staying focused, and solving problems.

Because of federal prohibition, most studies of cannabis's effects have been observational in nature, which can only reveal association and not causation.

In addition, the cannabis used in these trials was often unregulated and illegal, and it is unclear whether state-regulated legal cannabis has the same or different effects.

  • Organs of digestion

When inhaled, the smoke from cannabis may create a stinging or burning sensation in the mouth and throat.

When used orally, cannabis might induce stomach problems. THC has been demonstrated to reduce nausea and vomiting, but strong, chronic usage may have the opposite effect in certain individuals.

When consuming THC in any form, many individuals experience an increase in hunger often referred to as "the munchies."

This may be helpful for persons who want to gain weight, including cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy who need to eat more.

This might be a drawback for those attempting to reduce their weight, although research suggests that cannabis users don't have a higher risk of diabetes or obesity than nonusers.

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About the Creator

Jacob Damian

Whether you're looking to learn something new, explore different perspectives, or simply satisfy your curiosity, I can offer you insights and perspectives that you may not have considered before. With my ability to process and analyse.

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