vintage

Vintage geek content from the archives of the geek, comic, and entertainment collections.

  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 8 hours ago
    Gaslight (1944)

    Gaslight (1944)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published about 8 hours ago
    A Filmmaker's Guide: The Victorian Era

    A Filmmaker's Guide: The Victorian Era

    In this chapter of ‘the filmmaker’s guide’ we’re actually going to be learning about literature and film together. I understand that many of you are sitting in university during difficult times and finding it increasingly hard to study and I understand that many of you who are not at university or not planning on it are possibly stuck of what to do, need a break or even need to catch up on learning film before you get to the next level. This guide will be brief but will also contain: new vocabulary, concepts and theories, films to watch and we will be exploring something taboo until now in the ‘filmmaker’s guide’ - academia (abyss opens). Each article will explore a different concept of film, philosophy, literature or bibliography/filmography etc. in order to give you something new to learn each time we see each other. You can use some of the words amongst family and friends to sound clever or you can get back to me (email in bio) and tell me how you’re doing. So, strap in and prepare for the filmmaker’s guide to film studies because it is going to be one wild ride.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published a day ago
    Frankenstein (1931)

    Frankenstein (1931)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 2 days ago
    Rear Window (1954)

    Rear Window (1954)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 8 days ago
    The Maltese Falcon (1941)

    The Maltese Falcon (1941)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 8 days ago
    Citizen Kane (1941)

    Citizen Kane (1941)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 9 days ago
    The Jazz Singer (1927)

    The Jazz Singer (1927)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 10 days ago
    The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

    The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

    In this article, we will be looking at 2019’s book “1001 Movies to See Before You Die” and going through each film in a random order that I have chosen. We will be looking at what constitutes this film to be on the list and whether I think this film deserves to be here at all. I want to make perfectly clear that I won’t be revealing details from this book such as analyses by film reporters who have written about the film in question, so if you want the book itself you’ll have to buy it. But I will be covering the book’s suggestions on which films should be your top priority. I wouldn’t doubt for a second that everyone reading this article has probably watched many of these movies anyway. But we are just here to have a bit of fun. We’re going to not just look at whether it should be on this list but we’re also going to look at why the film has such a legacy at all. Remember, this is the 2019 version of the book and so, films like “Joker” will not be featured in this book and any film that came out in 2020 (and if we get there, in 2021). So strap in and if you have your own suggestions then don’t hesitate to email me using the address in my bio. Let’s get on with it then.
  • Pradeep Poudel
    Published 13 days ago
    History’s Most Legendary Magicians

    History’s Most Legendary Magicians

    Magic is a performance art that goes back thousands of years. The cups and balls, one of the fundamental tricks of magic that is still being performed today, was also done back in Roman times. The earliest named magician is even older than that, going all the way back to the first dynasties of Egypt. He was a legendary figure named Dedi, or Djedi, who was mentioned in the mythical Westcar Papyrus and performed conjuring effects for Pharaoh Khufu of the 4th Dynasty.
  • Annie Kapur
    Published 15 days ago
    A Filmmaker's Review: "Sudden Fear" (1952)

    A Filmmaker's Review: "Sudden Fear" (1952)

    “Sudden Fear” is a film that has its ups and downs, it isn’t perfect and yet it isn’t entirely bad. After the film, I sat and thought for a while about what I could write about the film without giving away too much information and now, I think I’ve found that I can do that. So, there will be no spoilers here and if you really want to see the film then please go ahead. This however, is going to be a mixed review with an on-edge quality for I am still slightly confused about how I am supposed to feel about this movie.
  • Cheryl E Preston
    Published 15 days ago
    The Andy Griffith Show: The Two Mayors

    The Andy Griffith Show: The Two Mayors

    Fans of The Andy Griffith show have the pleasure of currently being able to watch all their favorite old episodes on various cable television stations. These include Decades, METV, and TVLand. There are also some local channels that air this program. If you are like me, you are probably taking notice of things that you did not notice for more than 5 decades. One situation that I only recently took notice of was the fact that there were two different mayors. This stood out to me because the main characters were portrayed by the same actors during the run of the series.
  • Cheryl E Preston
    Published 2 months ago
    'The Green Hornet' Television Series Facts

    'The Green Hornet' Television Series Facts

    The Green Hornet and Kato Van Zandt Jarvis Williams was born on February 27, 1934 and died on November 28, 2016. He was an American actor best known for his leading role as Kenny Madison in two television detective series, Bourbon Street Beat (1959–1960) and the sequel, Surfside 6 (1960–1962). For one season, from 1966-1967 Williams portrayed the Green Hornet, AKA Britt Reid, on ABC. Martial Arts expert Bruce Lee was cast as his partner Kato. When Lee later became famous the show became a cult classic in reruns. It currently can be seen on The Decades cable channel. Here are some fun facts for nostalgia lovers.