science

Topics and developments in science and medicine, presented by Futurism.

  • Matt Swayne
    Published 5 months ago
    Who Wants to Win a Nobel Prize

    Who Wants to Win a Nobel Prize

    If we auctioned off all of the elements in your body —the carbon, oxygen, iron, sodium, etc. —you would be worth a grand total of about one U.S. dollar. Five bucks, if you had the right bidders, apparently.
  • Robert Lea
    Published 5 months ago
    Dark Matter: How We Know It's There

    Dark Matter: How We Know It's There

    Despite all of our advancements in science, physics, and astronomy, we still don’t know what approximately 80%-90% of the matter in the Universe is. But this isn’t a completely hopeless situation; there is a great deal we do know about this mysterious substance, provisionally named dark matter. For example, we know it’s there and we know where it is.
  • Robert Lea
    Published 5 months ago
    A Certain Uncertainty: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Explained

    A Certain Uncertainty: The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Explained

    'Uncertainty'—it's not a word that we generally associate with science. Science conjures images of certainty, solid results, and constant improvement by increment. There's a certain irony then, that when we strip nature down to its fundamental limits, there remains an implicit, irremovable, intrinsic uncertainty. No matter how precise our measuring devices and methods become, no matter how clever our scientists, nature has imposed a limit on what we can know. And we are certain of that. That's what the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle describes. And it isn't just a factor in quantum physics. It infiltrates our lives in a number of surprising ways.
  • Robert Lea
    Published 5 months ago
    The Physics of Solar Sails. How Photons Have Momentum Without Mass.

    The Physics of Solar Sails. How Photons Have Momentum Without Mass.

    The Planetary Society’s LightSail 2 project launches from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, as part of the US Air Force’s STP-2 mission. It will be carried by a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, enclosed within Prox-1 — a small satellite built by Georgia Tech students.
  • Aaron Dennis
    Published 5 months ago
    Life on Other Planets is Virtually Impossible

    Life on Other Planets is Virtually Impossible

    We’ve all read the books, seen the movies, and heard the stories. Scientists discuss it. NASA releases documentaries. Third parties create documentaries about life on Mars or Io. We’ve heard about Cydonia, the head of the android on the moon, and planet Nibiru. Everyone wants a future where traveling the stars and living on other planets is a real possibility. Unfortunately, it’s a bunch of crap, but what do I know, right?
  • Robert Lea
    Published 5 months ago
    Zipping Through Special Relativity: Reference Frames and Transformations

    Zipping Through Special Relativity: Reference Frames and Transformations

    Even from a modern perspective, it isn't difficult to understand why Einstein's theory of Special Relativity caused such a paradigm shift in physics and science in general. Until its introduction in the 1905 paper, On the electrodynamics of moving bodies, the scientific consensus was that space and time were separate entities—a stage on which the events of the universe played out. Special Relativity would not only unite space and time to a single entity—"Spacetime"—it would also lead to the conclusion that the events of the Universe shape that stage. Spacetime in Space Relativity and later General Relativity was no longer passive, it was a player in the events around it. Einstein proposed that clocks observed to be moving at high speeds would tick more slowly than those at rest.
  • Laura Sotillos Elliott
    Published 5 months ago
    Why Science Communication?

    Why Science Communication?

    Science communication contains three types of knowledge transmission: communication between scientists of the same field, communication between scientists of different fields and communication to non-scientists. Many scientists consider the first one to be pretty much achieved through specialist papers and conferences, but I would argue that there is still room for improvement. For starters, papers are like reading through a fragmented story where you have to decipher the way the researcher got from the beginning to the end. Did they have to slay a dragon or break a spell to find the treasure? Good luck finding that out. But I digress; this is not the topic of this post. Today we are interested in the other two types of scientific communication.
  • Jazlyn W.
    Published 5 months ago
    Pulse Waves of the Universe

    Pulse Waves of the Universe

    Bioenergy has been something of a mystery ever since people took the first steps towards spirituality. Parapsychologists, researchers of the phenomenon of the brain, when it comes to gifts such as telepathy, or seeing auras, have been researching it since the mid 1900s, and within the past century have been able to prove its existence through tons of newfound technology. However, by proving the existence of such an otherworldly sensation new questions have arrived. Namely, whether aura is just in a positive and negative state, but that it can be in a constant neutral pure moldable state that isn’t strictly tied down by a specific connotation. In either case, the answer is that it can be channeled into all three possibilities, that it has the ability to have a negative charge, a positive charge, or a neutral charge if not something more than a person can fully comprehend.
  • Marshall Barnes
    Published 6 months ago
    Tackling 'See You Yesterday' at the Goal Line

    Tackling 'See You Yesterday' at the Goal Line

    Well, Spike Lee's production of Stefon Bristol's first film feature, See You Yesterday was released the 17th of May and I still haven't seen it, which is fine. I've seen enough to be hacked off that I will have to go out and lecture at STEM schools to offset the bad and pathetic way that Bristol and his writing accomplice, Fredrica Bailey, portray STEM education, physics and time travel. Why me? Because I actually am a recognized STEM educator and leading expert on time travel science. I've lectured to and tested kids smarter than the two characters in Bristol's fantasy flick, on such subjects as parallel universes, time travel, wormholes, and the nature of time, and I don't like it when people come along and relieve themselves in my field of endeavor—just so they can make a buck. When that happens, there will be repercussions and frankly, I have no second thoughts about making an example out of Spike Lee and his "mentees." As they used to say, "It makes me no never mind..." because I've proven my cred—which is unmatched by pretty much anyone else. That's right. I am that guy.
  • Jacob Marshall
    Published 6 months ago
    Anti-Matter Interference Patterns
  • User 1
    Published 6 months ago
    Why Do We Dream?

    Why Do We Dream?

    I’m often left baffled, confused, and awestruck by the things that I dream about. Like you, I wondered exactly why we dream. There’s no doubt that dreams have a solid connection with our memory.
  • Flora Mayer
    Published 8 months ago
    Will Humans Ever Be Able to Outrun a Car?

    Will Humans Ever Be Able to Outrun a Car?

    Will humans ever be able to outrun a car? Answering this question will definitely require more physics than logic. One needs to understand how velocity changes with time (acceleration), as well as how to track the acceleration of two or more objects that race simultaneously within a specified distance. In our case, our objects include a human being and a car; once we establish which of the two objects has a higher acceleration, our question will be answered.