book review

Books reviews of the best science fiction stories, texts, educational texts, and journals.

  • Thao Thao Tran
    Published 4 months ago
    A reView about "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History"

    A reView about "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History"

    Imagine a non-fic book in the direction of a detective novel, where the victim slowly disappears, and the culprit is increasing. More specifically, the perpetrator showed no remorse, became more and more barbaric, scary, and his skills were so skilled that he did not need to try at all. Elizabeth Kolbert was the one who wrote this tragedy in the Pulitzer Prize winning book: Friday's Extinction. What is more frightening of all is that each of us has the face of the killer, and the victim is none other than the planet, where people are still living, breathing, and working.
  • Zoe
    Published 4 months ago
    B&B Review: The Electric State

    B&B Review: The Electric State

    One thing our book club loves is booze. Our book club also loves dystopian works mixed with straight-up existentialism. The next book on the Booze & Book Club list brought us back to our roots of dystopia by painting (literally) an alternate reality of 1997. I present to you, dear reader: The Electric State by Simon Stålenhag.
  • Rachael Arsenault
    Published 4 months ago
    What Can We Endure? Trans Representation in YA Fiction

    What Can We Endure? Trans Representation in YA Fiction

    I’ve been an avid reader of young adult literature for many years now, and there are a lot of reasons I keep coming back to the genre. There’s often a rawness and a realness to the voices of these stories that I haven’t really found in most of the adult or new adult literature I’ve read. It has an infectious energy. There’s also an appeal to the coming-of-age story versus reading about someone more jaded and experienced. But that’s not to say that YA is without its flaws. More and more as I read YA, I find it a bit… same-y.
  • Michael Grube
    Published 8 months ago
    'Caliban's War' (Expanse V2)

    'Caliban's War' (Expanse V2)

    The conclusion of Leviathan Wakes left me with more questions than answers, the beginning of Caliban's War had my mind racing with even more questions but equally, more excitement.
  • K.E. Lanning
    Published 9 months ago
    Review of 'The Testaments' by Margaret Atwood

    Review of 'The Testaments' by Margaret Atwood

    “Praise be!” It has been 34 years since the controversial, and even banned novel, The Handmaid’s Tale was published (1985), and on September 10, 2019, Margaret Atwood published its sequel, The Testaments. Her latest novel has already garnered critical praise and was named to the shortlist for the Booker Prize.
  • Erika Farrah
    Published 11 months ago
    'Leia, Princess of Alderaan'

    'Leia, Princess of Alderaan'

    As a die hard Star Wars fan I will always find new ways to learn more about the universe George Lucas created, including cosplaying as Princess Leia herself. It is one of my favorite things to do, and in order to add more to my portrayal of this great heroine, I read the book Leia, Princess of Alderaan by Claudia Gray.
  • K.E. Lanning
    Published 11 months ago
    Review of Author Cixin Liu's 'Supernova Era'

    Review of Author Cixin Liu's 'Supernova Era'

    Cixin Liu’s latest work, Supernova Era (launching this October & published by Tor Books), begins with a terrifying event—eight light-years from Earth, a dying star explodes into a supernova. Undetected by the world’s astrophysicists, the Earth takes a direct hit from massive waves of radiation, with disastrous effects rippling across the globe.
  • Lindsey Keefer
    Published about a year ago
    'Ubik' Review (Spoiler-Free)

    'Ubik' Review (Spoiler-Free)

    Going into reading Ubik, all I knew was that Philip K. Dick was its author and that it was some kind of science fiction. Unlike other editions of the book, the cover of my copy shows not a spray can of the eponymous substance, but a mix of strange, colorful, clipart-y images. I was so ready to get reading what promised to be a mind-bending sci-fi tale.
  • Matthew Kresal
    Published about a year ago
    'The Lives of Captain Jack: Volume 2' Review

    'The Lives of Captain Jack: Volume 2' Review

    For fans of 21st-century Doctor Who, few characters have left an impact the way Captain Jack Harkness has. Played by the incomparable John Barrowman and introduced in 2005's "The Empty Child"/"The Doctor Dances," he's gone on to be a sizable presence through numerous appearances, a spin-off series in the form of Torchwood, and even a mention in the 50th-anniversary special. He's also found a home on audio, with Barrowman reprising the role for Big Finish Productions since their Torchwood range kicked off in 2015. Even so, there are parts of this immortal wanderer's life left unaccounted for still, opening up new storytelling avenues. The Lives of Captain Jack offers up just such opportunities, and the second set, released in June 2019, also gives Jack a chance to do something he'd never get to do on-screen: interact with one of the Doctors from classic Who.
  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 9)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 9)

    Stephen Hawking made the statement, “Intelligence is central to what it means to be human.” This statement stood out to me because I never really thought about intelligence that way, it was just something we have. I feel like it can also be central to non-human animals because there are many of them that are extremely intelligent(not my dog though he is dumb, but I love him).
  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 7)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 7)

    Hawking postulates, "The clock and its movements are, of course, entirely symbolic but I feel compelled to point out that such an alarming warning from other scientists, prompted at least in part by the election of Donald Trump, must be taken seriously.” This statement stood out to me because I agree that the election of Donald Trump as president was terrible and it felt like it is speeding up the end of the world.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published about a year ago
    Review of Tobias Cabral's 'Night Music'

    Review of Tobias Cabral's 'Night Music'

    Well, it's not quite rock 'n' roll, but there's definitely crucial music in Tobias Cabral's short 2009 novel (136 pages) Night Music, which is all about what happens at Zubrin Base on Mars.