book review

Books reviews of the best science fiction stories, texts, educational texts, and journals.

  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 6)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 6)

    In terms of this chapter, I do believe that time travel is currently not real, but I think there is still a chance that it might exist one day. I personally do not think we will ever see it actually made and used in our lifetime. Compared to aliens, God, etc… I think time travel is on the bottom of the list of being real. Hawking made the statement that, “In science fiction, space and time warps are commonplace. They are used for rapid journeys around the galaxy or for travel through time.” This statement stood out to me because there are so many movies and shows that use time travel. The most recent I’ve seen are Avengers: Endgame and Supernatural.
  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 4)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 4)

    One of the statements Hawking made was, “They offer to behave better or be kinder if only they can get an A-grade for a course or pass their driving test.” This statement stood out to me because I am definitely going to pray to God that I pass my IB exams and get my IB diploma because it is something I want very much; although, I am not sure what I would do as an exchange because I am honestly a pretty good person, but we can all improve.
  • Kristin Wilson
    Published about a year ago
    Exploring the Second Insight

    Exploring the Second Insight

    The Celestine Prophecy, by James Redfield is a riveting adventure novel that uses the tale of one man's adventure through the virgin forests and ancient ruins of Peru in search of an ancient manuscript, which details an impending mass spiritual awakening on Earth. Not only does this manuscript predict a mass spiritual awakening, but it also lists the sequence in which it will happen at the individual level. The concepts of the insights cannot be grasped until the previous insight is fully understood... and the sequence is essential. Upon learning each Insight, you get a glimpse of a plethora of information that it seems you have suppressed some place deep in your soul, and the resonance of the knowledge comes flowing into you like ancient memories. The mystery of the Universe feels like less of a mystery and the steps forward seem refreshingly clear.
  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 2)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 2)

    Yes, I agree that the universe had a beginning, but I am not entirely sure what that beginning looks like. I am looking forward to future scientific discoveries that can shed a light on how exactly this universe came to be and why we are here. One specific statement I would like to expand upon is, “We don’t expect the universe to end in a brick wall, although there’s no logical reason why it couldn’t." This statement stood out to me because it is completely true; there is absolutely no reason why the universe could not end right now at this exact moment. That is to an extent crazy to think about because if the universe ends right now there are a lot of things I would never have gotten the chance to do or see; I wouldn’t have traveled or gone to college or seen my niece grow up. I do not want to die before I achieve all these things, but there is no reason why the entire universe couldn’t just stop at this very second. I don’t really know where I was going with this, but it is crazy to think my life and the life of everything I love could end instantly.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published about a year ago
    Review of David Walton's 'Three Laws Lethal'

    Review of David Walton's 'Three Laws Lethal'

    David Walton's newest novel, Three Laws Lethal—title inspired by Isaac Asimov's three laws of robotics—begins with what certainly is an ethical quandary that typifies our increasingly AI-driven age, in this case, driven literally. A mother with her children are passengers in an AI-driven automobile. She can turn around and tell them to stop arguing, without risking an accident. She marvels at being in the driver's seat with her hands off the wheel. And then... a big tree falls in front of them. To plow into the tree would risk the death of both mother and children. The AI computes the deadly odds, and acts upon it, instantly swerving the car to the right to avoid the tree. Unfortunately, there's a biker in that lane, and he's killed by the swerving car.
  • Selena Vazquez
    Published about a year ago
    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 1)

    Thoughts on the Book 'Brief Answers to the Big Questions' (Ch. 1)

    I believe faith plays a role in this chapter because he is answering the question about whether there is a God or not; evidence is highly important because the author is using scientific evidence to answer the chapter’s question. Imagination is involved because the author asks us to imagine certain situations in order to better understand his answer to the question. Group consensus plays a role because the laws of nature are accepted because of group consensus. Authority is also involved because Hawking is the authority since he is the author of the book; as well as how people see God as an authority figure. Sense perception can also be considered as a way of knowing for this situation because to understand the universe and the laws that govern it we use our different senses. Reason plays a role as well because the author is using logical arguments and scientific laws to answer the question. I don’t necessarily agree or disagree with the conclusion he came upon, which is that there is no God. This is because the science Hawking was explaining made sense to me and I agree with the scientific part of it. For example, I believe in evolution even though I was taught that God created all living things. I change my religious beliefs based on new evidence and new proof that we find because I hold science very highly. Thus even though I agree with the science of our universe, I still believe that there is a celestial being out there that is beyond scientific explanation. I believe in this entity not because there is an abundant amount of evidence it does but because I really want it to. I want it to exist because if it does exist then there is high chance heaven and hell exists as well.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published about a year ago
    Review of J. Neil Schulman's 'The Fractal Man'

    Review of J. Neil Schulman's 'The Fractal Man'

    Alternate realities have become something of a vogue in science fiction, especially on television with Fringe and Counterpart. I've even tried my hand at it in a few short stories such as "The Other Car." But J. Neil Schulman has outdone all of this with his novel The Fractal Man, which for most of its 160 some odd pages—meant literally as well as a figure of speech here—is not only a masterpiece of alternate reality, but one of the best science fiction novels I've ever read, literally.
  • Sasha Konikovo
    Published about a year ago
    10 True Stories About Alien Abductions That Will Have You Believing

    10 True Stories About Alien Abductions That Will Have You Believing

    Imagine being able to be one of first humans in history to meet an intelligent life form from another planet. Cool, right? Most people like the idea of meeting aliens in theory, but the truth is, we would probably all be terrified if we saw extraterrestrials in real life.
  • Ada Zuba
    Published about a year ago
    History in Fantasy Books

    History in Fantasy Books

    I am a huge fan of fantasy books, whether they be for children, teens or adults. I like to indulge in the fantasy worlds and get to know them. However, once you get older and you read these books you realize that that are real-life history elements that have been placed in them. So, here is a list of fantasy books that historical and religious elements in them.
  • Tom Baker
    Published about a year ago
    No Man an Island

    No Man an Island

    "A lifetime of service in a vast effort of war, the whole of which he could never comprehend. He, who had sworn never again to so much as think of an instrument of war, who had hated the scheming and killing and the designing of scientists for better ways of killing more of their fellow men. But he thought back to the vision of evil that Jorgasnovara had shown them and he knew there was only one answer." —Raymond F. Jones, This Island Earth (1949)
  • Mimo le Singe
    Published about a year ago
    Mimo Reads: 'Once Upon a Story You've Always Been Told' (2018)

    Mimo Reads: 'Once Upon a Story You've Always Been Told' (2018)

    I first heard about this little book in passing on YouTuber Lilly Singh's (AKA iiSuperwomanii's) Instagram back in August, and though I had been since genuinely interested in checking it out, I had since that time been too preoccupied with work, my other projects, and reading other books to properly sit down and give it the attention it deserves.
  • HR Burton
    Published about a year ago
    'Vampire Royals' Book Series Review

    'Vampire Royals' Book Series Review

    Brought to us by Leigh Walker, this series is a mix between 'The Selection' and 'Twilight' mixed in with its own flavor. It's about a royal family of vampires who are run out of their country by a disease and take over a human country. About five years after this happens the Royal Family decides to create a pageant where two girls from each settlement are brought to the castle and try to win the prince's heart.