tv review

Big crimes, small screen; true crime television series and TV documentaries that recreate and reexamine some of the mystifying and grisliest cases in history.

  • Shain Thomas
    Published 10 months ago
    'Instinct': S02.E07. “After Hours”

    'Instinct': S02.E07. “After Hours”

    In the first of two Instinct episodes, televised on CBS Sunday, 11 August 2019, we found Yale Psychology Professor and NYPD consultant Dr Dylan Reinhart (Alan Cumming) and NYPD Det Lizzie Needham (Bojana Novakovic) “go undercover in New York’s erotic underworld when they investigate the murder of a high-powered public relations rep. Also, a glamorous love from Julian’s [past] comes back into his life with a proposal he can’t resist.”
  • Shain Thomas
    Published 10 months ago
    'Westside': S05. E08. Episode Eight

    'Westside': S05. E08. Episode Eight

    Westside continues to hit all the right notes as one of the best television productions to come out of New Zealand. The production, picked up for a sixth and final series, is the prequel period dramedy to Outrageous Fortune.
  • Joanna White
    Published 10 months ago
    Why I Love Characters from 'Criminal Minds'

    Why I Love Characters from 'Criminal Minds'

    Criminal Minds is a show that’s been around for a long time and I am super excited that it is. It’s my favorite Crime Show. I love how character-oriented they are, and not just about the show’s main cast. Every episode takes us into the minds of the villains and really shows us the things that they went through to make them the bad guys they are today. Today, I’m going over my favorite characters from Criminal Minds and why I love them so much.
  • Nancy D
    Published 11 months ago
    What Happened to the 'Jailbirds' Women After the Show?

    What Happened to the 'Jailbirds' Women After the Show?

    To help fans wait for the next Orange is The New Black, Netflix made another original show that features women in jail. This time, it's a documentary. It's called Jailbirds and it has caused quite the controversial debate on what is ethical. The women who agreed to this show were very bored, and I'm sure being interviewed gave them quite the opportunity to feel like they are being listened to. Was it wrong to take advantage of women in jail in order to make new entertainment? Or was this a good opportunity to give a voice to people being incarcerated?
  • Melissa Lee
    Published 11 months ago
    Carrying Biracial Guilt Through the Lens of 'When They See Us'

    Carrying Biracial Guilt Through the Lens of 'When They See Us'

    Unless you’ve been living under a pop culture-deprived rock, you’ve probably either heard, watched, or cried along to Netflix’s latest drama miniseries, When They See Us. As the brainchild of Ava DuVernay (A Wrinkle in Time), Robin Swicord (The Curious Case of Benjamin Button), and, unsurprisingly, Oprah Winfrey, the series chronicles the truth behind the infamous Central Park jogger case in which five innocent black and Hispanic minors were wrongfully imprisoned for the rape and attempted murder of Trisha Meili.
  • Herbert Seward III
    Published 12 months ago
    Series Review: 'When They See Us'

    Series Review: 'When They See Us'

    So... when I saw this dramatic re-telling of the ordeal of the Central Park 5 being advertised on Netflix, I was already pretty sure that it was going to be must-watch television. I was also extremely apprehensive about seeing the events through the eyes of these five kids (now grown men) and being able to emotionally process it all. The case (and the legal and societal issues it brings to the forefront) kind of hits close to home for me as a parent, and as an African-American man. I'd seen the Ken Burns documentary on the Central Park 5 a while back, so I was already very familiar with the case, and some of the very problematic issues it brought to the table for the American public to address. Systemic racism, classism, and lack of accountability for law enforcement and agents of the legal system were all things that were at the forefront of the documentary. Ava Duvernay did an excellent job of showing the social and personal toll this case had on these men and their families, as well as the greater impact that the institutions of the law and media played in that accrued trauma. Every episode of this mini-series was visceral and traumatic. Whether it was the very public shunning of Yusuf Salaam, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, and Raymond Santana upon their release from custody as adults, to the entire fourth episode being devoted to the ordeal of Korey Wise's experiences at Riker's Island as an adult, the entire progression of the series takes a huge emotional toll on the audience watching it.
  • Hannah Elliott
    Published about a year ago
    True Crime Must Watch

    True Crime Must Watch

    Lately, all the rage on Netflix has been about these True Crime Documentaries. It truly is fascinating to learn why these men and women decided to do such horrible things towards other humans. With so many out there, there are some great ones and some that are not as thrilling. I have watched a fair majority of them, well pretty much all but 2 or 3. In talking with others and seeing posts online I've noticed that many people question why they did the crimes they did, how they don't get the why.
  • Angie Robinson
    Published about a year ago
    20 Must-See Netflix Crime Documentaries
  • Timothy Kohut
    Published about a year ago
    10 Documentaries About Dangerous Cults

    10 Documentaries About Dangerous Cults

    Call it human nature, nosiness, or just plain fascination—there is something inherently intoxicating about cult documentaries. While they are quite dark in nature, they are nonetheless intriguing; mostly due to the fact that they just appear so insane that you couldn't believe people ACTUALLY fell for that kind of a farce. But hindsight is 20/20, and these poor victims who fell pray to "drinking the Kool Aid," so to speak, made gruesome history in the process.
  • Paul Levinson
    Published about a year ago
    Review of 'The Case Against Adnan Syed' 1

    Review of 'The Case Against Adnan Syed' 1

    The Case Against Adnan Syed debuted last night on HB0, the first in a four-episode documentary about the murder of Hae Min Lee on January 13, 1999, for which Syed was convicted. The podcast Serial in 2014 generated enormous international interest about this case, and the possibility that Syed was not the killer. Presumably at least in part as a result of this and new evidence brought to light, the path to a new trial was set for Syed in July 2016 by a Maryland Court of Special Appeals. That court indeed ordered a new trial in March 2018. But a higher Maryland Court of Appeals overturned that order on March 8, 2019—or, amazingly, just two days before the premiere of the HBO series. You just can't make this stuff up.
  • Kayla Triplett
    Published about a year ago
    Shane Dawson New Series

    Shane Dawson New Series

    "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter." —Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Brian Anonymous
    Published about a year ago
    My Review of 'Bad Blood'

    My Review of 'Bad Blood'

    I didn't expect Netflix to have a TV series based on mafia gangsters in Canada. Let's face it, no one really expected it. Usually when we think of mafia crimes, we think of New York, Chicago, and Las Vegas. The big profile stories are always based in the United States, especially the true story ones. Although the stories have been made over and over again. I guess they needed new material. It so happens that Canada had a large mafia problem of their own. I'm sure not a lot of people know about the story of Vito Rizzuto. Sometimes they say the biggest gangsters are the ones that no one knows about. That ended soon now that this series has been made. Who knows... Canadian shows aren't ever that popular.