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A.A Reunion

By: J.A.F_Jess A. Fox

By Jessica A. FoxPublished 2 years ago 7 min read
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The story starts in a small reception hall filled with different individuals of all cultures and gender; essential to mention because many have formed groups within the crowd and respond differently to the information provided due to the culture’s overall belief system. Many of the women keep away from the men because most in the crowd are victims of rape. However, two people are about to change the overall dynamics. In the front of the room is a former AA member Sarah who has been sober for two years and had her first glass of wine three days ago at a reunion. In her terms, the young lady’s family castrated her, saying she would never change; heartbroken, she was getting ready to relapse but instead remained outside the liquor store and eventually returned home. She shares with the group and adds she felt saddened that she could not share this enormous breakthrough with her family and friends because of the glass of wine. The crowd cheered for her, and some even came to provide her with a hug. Sarah begins to cry and says thank you. The coordinator of the program smiles and says, “I believe you have something to share for us?” Sarah wipes her tears and says, “yes, I wrote a poem called the past is only part of me. I used the poetry to help me overcome my emotions and felt this would be something the group could benefit from hearing and possibly applying themselves in their recoveries.” The crowd starts to cheer, and someone in the crowd says, “get it, girl.” Sarah takes the mic and begins to pace in the front of the room and says, after taking a deep breath:

“We look at where we were and often forget where we are and can be; it’s like the past is something we use to cloud our future or reality. But why cloud our future or reality with things that we no longer hold dear to our hearts? Shaping to destroy my future before it starts; my past is my past, many bring it to the present. My past is my past, all that pain, and I am not stressing. My past is my past, even when I lost it all. My past is my past; they can no longer benefit from it now? My past is my past; I had to repeat it again; my past is my past; I was what age again? My past is my past, but it’s true I hurt you, me, and every I love you too—my past brought-up top to play in the present and near but semi far down future. So, I took the girl in the mirror, one of my favorite poems, to question what I truly wanted; looking at all she’s overcome, you can never tell her that she isn’t working hard—working hard for all she wanted and even harder to get and keep all that she got. The green light, go, into the present and future, like an empty road and full tank of gas. Just zooming past, my past and bowing because I made it out, on my own, on my own, I made it out my mess. But then again, my past is what? How could my past define me? I am who I am? and it’s about what I answer to that pass man. I said, my past is my past, and my past is a pass, bowing down to it because it was a 19-year class. Yes, I said, my past is my past, and my past, I could say, makes me better. My past is my past, and my past made me clever. So, on my past is my past, it’s time I sign out, I’ll come back next year for another guiding out.”

The crowd begins to chant, “More, more, more” Sarah smiles and replies, “next year, maybe” The meeting ends with a couple of other people speaking. The last speakers shared a familiar story to the one Sarah shared, and Sarah grew an attraction. The guy added this was his first time in AA and personally didn’t feel comfortable because of his career and family background. Sarah grew curious and began to discuss with him once the coordinator called the meeting done. They had a coffee together and then went their ways. The following day Sarah is due at work, as the assistant must meet with the new partners of their recent merger. Sarah arrives early excited, as their merger brought forth the money she required to put her son, she had at 17 and a half through surgery for his tumor. She prepared pastries and lunch for the entire crew and began to place them on the conference table. As she is setting the table, the male she had coffee with walks inside of the room and says, “a woman of great vocabulary and task, the hallway smells amazing.” Sarah smiles and responds, “thank you, but what are you going here?” The young male smiles and says, “my father will be merging his company with this company, and as his assistant, I must meet with this company’s assistant.” Sarah laughs and says, well, that would be her, and the two begin to have formal and informal conversations. Eventually, the young man’s father arrives and says, “Jason, I am sure everything is in order?” Jason smiles and says, “everything is signed and dated, and I got my number” he provides his father with the paperwork and winks his eye at Sarah. Jason’s father responds, “good’ while going to shake Sarah’s hand her adds ‘looking forward to doing business with you. If you don't have any questions? I must leave, an emergency came up” Sarah responds, “No sir, all is well on our end; the president will contact you the moment they receive the documentation themselves.”

The night ends with Jason and Sarah going out for dinner and a dance. The two laughed the night away and grew close to one another in only two months: Jason, however, begins to travel a lot due to the mergers broadening out of seas. Jason began to worry about Sarah’s loyalty when he would leave, so he asked her to marry him. Sarah refused to let him know it was too early, and he did not have to rush marriage in fear of losing her. Jason did not respond well to being rejected, and they had their first fight. Jason did not respond to Sarah’s messages any longer, and she got upset and turned to a poem each time she wanted to have a drink. By the end of the month, Sarah had over 50 poems and a healed heart. Sarah eventually meets a girlfriend but does not attach titles in the hopes that Jason will return. After the second month, Sarah grew concerned and called Jason’s brother. Sarah and Jason’s brother do not get along because Sarah kept Jason focused on his father’s growing company. The brother opened his own business and wanted Jason full-time. The brother greeted Sarah with a hello and added his appreciation for keeping his brother so passionate about his work. Without her being the assistant, this merger would not have been a success. Sarah kept him focused.

Sarah laughs and says, “gosh, who died, jokes, thank you, how are you?” The brother does not respond. Sarah says, “hello, I was wondering if you have seen Jason?” the brother starts to cry on the other line and says, “he was in an accident (and pauses). They’re removing something from his leg; he might lose a leg.” Sarah responds, “wow, you had me scared for a minute; support him; I am coming now, where are you?” The brother goes silent again and hang-ups. Sarah gets upset and goes to a rage cage where she sees Jason. The two lock eyes and instantly embrace one another. Jason says, “Sarah, I have to call you Sarah; why would you tell my brother off when he wants to ask if you’re interested in coming? Sarah begins to laugh and pushes her pinkies into his head and says, “move, acting all stupid, call your brother now or shut up and cage it out.” Jason laughs, and the two enter the rage cage together and work out their monsters. The two end up writing a poem together, which they later shared with the AA meeting. This meeting leads to the crowd branching out to have more private discussions with other meeting members.

Friendship
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Jessica A. Fox

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