The Mystique of Diablo Canyon

by Cheryl Lynn 2 years ago in nature

Geological Magnificence Hidden Deep in the Desert

The Mystique of Diablo Canyon

As a lifelong resident of Santa Fe, New Mexico, I have always been drawn to the enigmatic Diablo Canyon. This unique landmark lies just outside our city border, between Santa Fe and Los Alamos. As part of the Caja Del Rio plateau formation, the mystique of this beautiful desert gorge includes prehistoric petroglyphs, desert wildlife, indigenous plants, and the flowing freshwater of the Rio Grande. The area is remote enough to immerse oneself in nature, but accessible enough to bring camping equipment or even plan a family day trip. Hikers of all ages and skill levels come here. Some admire the beauty from a distance, others walk through the winding path, and others take extreme challenges in rock climbing. Everyone is welcome at this national park.

Though the high desert is usually sunny and hot, the canyon has also survived harsh winds, rain, and even snow.

Throughout the canyon, massive jigsaw puzzles of basalt boulders make sheer vertical drops, flanking the sinuous remains of an ancient riverbed. "Solar Cave" is found in the North face, also known as the Winter Wall, so named because the sun warms this section year-round. A slot canyon known as "The Grotto" can also be discovered on the upper area of the Southern wall. Just past this intersection is another rock formation known as "The Alcove." Rappelling equipment are embedded in the rocks, telltale signs of climbers who scale the treacherous bluffs.

Precarious rock formations have withstood the test of time for millennia.

The valley of the canyon consists of a dusty path of silt, with desert sand so deep that it buries huge boulders of lava rock until only the craterous tops are visible. A closer look reveals that the cliffs themselves are standing on a foundation of this very sand, which is eroded every year by dramatic weather such as harsh winds, flash floods, and even hail and ice. However, this majestic landscape has towered over the area for millions of years, a geological titan since it was formed shortly after the Cretaceous period (approximately 65 million years ago).

The soft sand dotted with huge boulders can be difficult terrain to traverse.

Even in this hostile environment, the desert ecosystem thrives. Various species of cactus, including Cane Cholla and Elephant Ear, cling to the bluffs by their roots. Desert blossoms such as prickly pear, Indian paintbrush, and scarlet globemallow are also abundant. During blooming season, the flora erupts in neon bursts of crimson, hot pink, and bright yellow.

These colorful cactus blossoms may some day fruit into "Prickly Pears", which gives the cactus its name.

Wild horses roam the plateau, as well as domesticated equines and cattle. Befitting its moniker, Diablo Canyon is also a haven for predators. Turkey vultures and hawks circle overhead, while black bears, mountain lions, and wolves prowl the badlands. I remember one misadventure, when a fellow explorer and I took a small side path and inadvertently stumbled into a den. The bones of small animals and the stench of death permeated the small inlet in the rock bluffs. However, proper precaution and common sense will prevent any mishaps with the local wildlife. The New Mexico Bureau of Land Management maintains the area, and incidents are more likely to occur from rock fall than from wild animals.

The desert is habitat to many wild animals, although they rarely pose a threat to humans.

Diablo Canyon is resplendent with geological wonder and natural beauty. Nestled deep in the heart of central New Mexico, this glorious landscape is a testament to the allure of the Land of Enchantment.

Juniper trees and other flora thrive in Diablo Canyon.

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Cheryl Lynn

I am a blogger and freelance journalist, specializing in music reviews, band interviews, and other entertainment related articles. On top of my nonfiction writing skills, I also have a portfolio of published poetry and creative writing. 

See all posts by Cheryl Lynn