humanity

Humanity topics include pieces on the real lives of politicians, legislators, activists, women in politics and the everyday voter.

  • Hexe News
    Published 3 months ago
    No, this isn't the "war" that young people need

    No, this isn't the "war" that young people need

    Without a doubt, the current pandemic is an awful time - for everybody. So, understand my confusion (and shock) when I see online posts and even articles stating that the younger generations "needed" this hardship.
  • Dalton Ryder
    Published 3 months ago
    An Open Letter to Trump Supporters and Anyone Willing to Listen
  • Chris Hearn
    Published 3 months ago
    Covid-19: Freedom and Sacrifice in a Pandemic

    Covid-19: Freedom and Sacrifice in a Pandemic

    Is there anyone out there who actually wants all of the restrictions being placed on so much of the planet as the result of the Covid-19 pandemic? No. The answer is no. The vast majority of people do not want to live under restrictions imposed by governments. And that is completely understandable.
  • Amanda Clark
    Published 3 months ago
    Dealing with Fear in Our Time

    Dealing with Fear in Our Time

    No matter what side you are on, or where you live, there is a permeating sense of dread and fear. It has gripped whole nations and populations. There are protests for many things going on at the same time. Listen to any protester on any side. Their words may be different and their topics divisive, but at the core of their beliefs, their concerns, is an enveloping sense of terror and fear.
  • Nicole Anderson
    Published 3 months ago
    The Lesser Evil for the Greater Good

    The Lesser Evil for the Greater Good

    I live in California, blessed to be sheltering-in-place while my husband works from home. Sure, the past month I’ve been stripped of many of my basic rights. Hell, today the neighborhood forest trail where I walk several times a week to keep fit and sane has closed, even though I see more people in my neighborhood walking my dogs than I ever have walking that path. Regardless, it’s a state park and it’s now off limits.
  • Madeline Keys
    Published 3 months ago
    American rights during Covid-19

    American rights during Covid-19

    It's no secret that the response of the United States to the Covid-19 pandemic was late. Even though information was readily available that pointed clearly to acting quickly in order to slow the spread of the virus, as well as the examples of other countries that had devastating results, our country's government chose to wait until the virus was already at an uncontrollable spread throughout the nation to take any serious measure. While it is sadly not surprising that these are the decisions President Donald Trump has made, what is surprising is some people's lack of humanity now. With all the information provided by scientists and doctors who are recommending we practice social distancing and only go out for necessary reasons, why is it that thousands of Americans are still not listening? Is it possible that the American mindset of holding onto our rights is actually preventing us from showing basic human kindness?
  • Steve Harrison
    Published 3 months ago
    'Covid' Ops: Flood the web with blue and red

    'Covid' Ops: Flood the web with blue and red

    In order to “save lives” from a “mysterious virus” which only proves fatal to predominantly the most vulnerable in our society, with seriously compromised immune systems, who have faced the same challenges with the flu last year, the year before that... and for many years before... we’ve been imprisoned by the UK government for almost three weeks. Our crime? Beats the hell out of me.
  • Christopher Michael
    Published 4 months ago
    The Fundamentalist Fallacy

    The Fundamentalist Fallacy

    “When the fundamentalist wins, the world enters a dark age"
  • test
    Published 4 months ago
    Aristotle

    Aristotle

    Throughout the Classical period Aristotle had been a Greek philosopher and polymath in Ancient Greece. He was the founder of the Lyceum, and Aristotelian Theory and Philosophy's Peripatetic School. Along with his teacher Plato, he was called the father of Western Philosophy. His research covers biology, genetics, zoology, metaphysics, philosophy, ethics, painting, poetry, theatre, writing, rhetoric, psychology, linguistics, economics, history and economy. Aristotle gave a complex interpretation of the other theories that existed before him, and it was from his teachings above all that the West extracted his philosophical lexicon, as well as the tools of questions and examination. His philosophy has since had a tremendous impact on almost every area of knowledge in the West, and remains the subject of contemporary academic debate. None of his own lives are known. Aristotle was born in the town of Stagira, in northern Greece. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle was a child, and had been raised by a guardian. Around the age of seventeen or eighteen he entered the Plato Academy in Athens, and stayed there until he was thirty-seven. Soon after the death of Plato Aristotle left Athens and tutored Alexander the Great at the behest of Philip II of Macedon beginning in 343 BC. In the Lyceum, he founded a library that helped him produce some of his hundreds of papyrus scrolls. Although Aristotle wrote many elegant treatises and dialogues for publication, only about a third of his original writing, none of which was intended for publication, has survived. Physical science influenced Aristotle's opinions on the scholarship of the mediaeval period. Their influence extended from the Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages into the Renaissance, and was not continually replaced until the Enlightenment and philosophies such as classical mechanics. Any of Aristotle's zoological observations, found in his biology, such as on the reproductive neck of the octopus, were disbelieved until the 19th century. His studies include the earliest recorded systematic logic analysis which was studied by mediaeval writers including Peter Abelard and John Buridan. Aristotle's influence on logic, however, continued well into the 19th century. He influenced Islamic philosophy as well as Christian theology during the Middle Ages, especially Early Church Neoplatonism and scholastic practise of the Catholic Church. Aristotle has been regarded by mediaeval Muslim thinkers as "The First Scholar," and by mediaeval Christians such as Thomas Aquinas as the fundamental philosopher. Though still dominant, the theory sparked a revived interest in the recent development of virtue ethics, for instance in the work of Alasdair MacIntyre and Philippa Foot. In Prior Analytics, Aristotle is credited with the first study of formal logic, and his invention of it became the dominant style of Western logic until advances of mathematical logic in the 19th century. In Pure Reason's Critique Kant believed it had been inferred with Aristotle's logic. Contrary to his teacher Plato, Aristotle's philosophy is against the abstract. Aristotle's ontology positions the absolute in particulars, events in the cosmos, while Plato's ideal is a purely recurring concept that imitates real things. To Aristotle, shape is always based on what phenomena, but in a particular substance it is instantiated. Aristotle's empirical theory encompasses a broad variety of natural phenomena beyond those already being investigated by biology, psychology, and other natural sciences. "Physical philosophy" is, in Aristotle's words, a branch of philosophy that addresses real life phenomena, including fields that can today be considered physics, psychology, and other natural sciences. Aristotle's work encompassed virtually every aspect of metaphysical inquiry. Aristotle makes philosophy coextensive, in the broadest sense, with logic, which he most also describe as intelligence. Remember, though, that the use of the term analysis has a meaning distinct from that which the term science method offers.
  • test
    Published 4 months ago
    Alcibiades

    Alcibiades

    Alcibiades, son of Cleinias, from the deme of Scambonidae, was a prominent Athenian statesman, orator, and general. He was the last famed descendant of his parents 'aristocratic family, the Alcmaeonidae, who had fallen from favour after the Peloponnesian War. He played an significant part in the second half of the war as a diplomatic advisor, military officer, and dictator. During the Peloponnesian War Alcibiades had changed its political allegiance several times. In the early 410s BC he advocated robust foreign policies in his native Athens and was a leading advocate of the Sicilian Invasion but he fled to Sparta after his political opponents laid charges of sacrilege against him. He served in Sparta as a political counsellor, organising or coordinating a great many big actions against Athens. Nevertheless, in Sparta too, Alcibiades soon made close friends, and felt compelled to rebel against Persia. There he served as an adviser to the satrap of the Tissaphernes until his military Athenian allies took his memories. He then spent a few years as an Athenian general, but his opponents eventually tried to oust him a second time. Scholars have indicated that had the Sicilian expedition been under Alcibiades rather than Nicias 'command, the expedition would not have met its final catastrophic fate. Alcibiades played a key role in the undoing of Athens during the years during which he commanded Sparta; Decelea's overthrow and the revolts of other important Athenian subjects happened either at his behest or under his influence. Upon returning to his home town, however, he played a central role in a series of Athenian victories that eventually led Sparta to make peace with Athens. He favoured unorthodox tactics, and primarily won over cities by treachery or coercion rather than by attack. Alcibiades 'military and diplomatic abilities also proved valuable to whichever state his loyalty still held, but his propensity to attract powerful enemies ensured that he never stuck in one place for a long time; and by the end of the war he had begun to rekindle in the early 410's, his days of diplomatic prominence were a bygone memory. Since signing the Nicias Agreement, Alcibiades first rose to notoriety when he began advocating radical Athenian politics. The settlement, an uneasy truce signed halfway through the Peloponnesian War between Sparta and Athens, came at the culmination of seven years of conflict during which neither of the two sides had gained a decisive advantage. Historians Arnold W. Gomme and Raphael Sealey argue that, as Thucydides writes, Alcibiades was irritated by the Spartans negotiating the peace for Nicias and Laches, ignoring him because of his youth. Disputes over understanding of the treaties forced the Spartans to send formally authorised delegates to Athens to resolve all matters pending. Initially these delegates were well received by the Athenians, but Alcibiades met secretly with them before they spoke to the ecclesia and warned them that the council was haughty and with high ambitions. He encouraged them to give up their political power to represent Sparta, and instead to encourage him to assist them through his position in Athenian politics. The delegates accepted and were isolated from Nicias, inspired by Alcibiades, who truly wished to reach an agreement with the Spartans. During the next day's meeting, Alcibiades asked them what powers Sparta had given them to negotiate and, as agreed, they replied that they had not come with full and fair arms. It was in complete contrast to what they had said the day before and Alcibiades took advantage of this moment to condemn their actions, cast doubt on their goals and damage their prestige. This strategy boosted Alcibiades 'reputation and thereby embarrassed Nicias, and subsequently Alcibiades was appointed chancellor.
  • Robert Gitau
    Published 4 months ago
    Police Brutality: What Fuels Police Militarization and Brutality in Kenya?
  • Joella Terry
    Published 4 months ago
    Will We Survive Operation COVID-19?

    Will We Survive Operation COVID-19?

    One question that has been going around lately in every city and every household is will we survive the coronavirus epidemic? Are we going to be around for our next birthday the children may ask or will I be around to see my kids graduate some adults are wondering.