eating

Dispel judgement, debunk the myths and correct the misconceptions you hold about eating disorders.

  • Alexis Keegan
    Published 8 days ago
    Anorexia

    Anorexia

    My struggle with loving myself as I am since I was in 11th grade. It started with my friends always making comments about how big my boobs were and then how big my bottom was. I've always been self conscious of how I looked. I've always been a C cup and had a big bottom and though my friends may have been saying it as a compliment, to me it just made me feels worse. It got worse when boys in high school started to make comments about my weight and mean girls in high school were even worse. It started with healthy weight loss at first; going to the gym, eating healthier and drinking more water. But I didn't see any results, so I started eating less, working out more and drinking mostly water. But when even that wasn't enough for me, I straight up started not eating, working out super hard and drinking only water. This went on for about 6 months. During that time, I met a guy who destroyed me mentally, he would comment how I ate a lot when I actually ate and compare my body to other women's bodies. My dad also made comments about how much I ate even though I'd go days without eating and when I did eat, it was only a bite or two of cereal, as I could never finish my bowl. I was literally bones, my ribs protruded through my skin, my face was very thin and my arms were tiny. The only kind of weight I had was my thighs. But I still didn't feel skinny enough. I still wanted to lose more weight. I wanted to be perfect, just like the women all over the internet and magazines. I felt like my body wasn't enough and that I was ugly. I got a gym membership and spent hours working out. After work, I'd go workout, with nothing but water in my system. My mental health was depleting the longer I kept destroying myself and my body. It wasn't until I met the love of my life that everything changed. I met him at work and while I was there I was still anorexic. He asked me a couple of times if I was hungry, and the look on his face every time I told him I wasn't hungry, and he gave me a look that made me feel something. We started officially dating and on our dates, I started eating, a little at a time. I couldn't eat a whole lot, but I ate enough. Now this wasn't some miraculous story about how he instantly changed my life and how I was No, this took time, a lot of time. It started out with little things, he would never comment on what I ate, he would always call me beautiful. Though I never felt beautiful, he helped me a little bit at a time by giving me hope that one day I may feel beautiful again. I had decided that I wanted to get better. I wanted to have a great future and to be healthy and happy with my body. But the first month we started dating, I was hit with a very bad kidney infection. I wasn't able to keep any food or water down. I was so thin, thinner than I had ever been. I got so upset because I felt like garbage and I was upset at how all of my progress disappeared. But I kept fighting, because I wanted to be healthy again, I needed to be healthy again. After another few months, I had finally started being healthy mentally and physically. It wasn't easy, I fought everyday not to go back to the person I was before. I fought everyday with the image that I was ugly and not worth anything. I wasn't over weight but I wasn't super thin any more. I finally was eating normal again and I was genuinely happy. And then we found out we were expecting a baby. My first two months of being pregnant, I developed hyperemesis gravidarum; extreme vomiting during pregnancy. I lost thirty pounds while pregnant and I was so upset with myself. I was upset that I couldn't keep down any food, that I couldn't leave the bedroom without throwing up. I was angry and upset with myself. And then the miscarriage happened. I remember the day like it was yesterday. May 23rd, 2020. I went into a deep state of depression. I didn't want to leave the bed, I ate my pain away, all I did was cry. I gained all of my weight back and 40 pounds extra. Then in August I went to my birthday party and took a photo and realized how much I left myself go. So this month, I decided to start losing weight in a healthy way. I started doing a little working out everyday, drinking more water and eating extremely healthy. I don't look at the scale, because I don't want to discourage myself and the progress that I've already made.
  • Billie
    Published 27 days ago
    How I Took Back Ownership of My Body

    How I Took Back Ownership of My Body

    I struggled with my body for as long as I can remember though I never had a problem until I entered middle school. Since I was four years I saw myself with a massive stomach even in reality I was skinny. I was always active as a child, I never really overate, and my family had a pretty healthy lifestyle so even now I don't understand where those thoughts came from. They were just there and I continue to live with them.
  • Bella Higgins
    Published 29 days ago
    My best friend.

    My best friend.

    Stones. Pounds. Kilograms. Something I have not seen in a while. Not since m mother threw out our tired old scales thats purple shade had faded more than the hairs on my father's head. They had only been collecting dust on the top landing for years and were practically stained that mousy-brown colour that, quite frankly, looked like what I deposited down the toilet after a horrendous dinner made by my grandmother, who -in her prime- was an amazing cook, not it was as if an oven was product made by aliens and food was edible fresh out of the freezer!
  • Kristin Weaver
    Published about a month ago
    The Lonely Road

    The Lonely Road

    The bell on the door chimes as she walks into the 24-hour diner. The waitress sees her and nods, knowing her order. She puts in the order before Laura has even taken a seat, in her red leather booth by the window. She slurps down the extra-large chocolate shake. The waitress approaches her to ask if Laura would like some napkins, but it’s too late. Laura’s straw is already swirling around the last bit of the shake. At this point, there is only whipped cream and a cherry remaining. With it, she ordered a burger and onion rings.
  • magdalena brock
    Published 2 months ago
    How can eating disorders be related to societal pressure?

    How can eating disorders be related to societal pressure?

    In the past 20 years, the need to be connected to everyone, everywhere, all the time has increased tenfold. With the development of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, and Tumblr, everyone feels the pressure of social media.
  • Amelia Grant
    Published 2 months ago
    6 Reasons for Visiting a Therapist About Your Relationship With Food

    6 Reasons for Visiting a Therapist About Your Relationship With Food

    The current diet culture created a general obsession with weight that has made many people sick and can lead to eating disorders. Relentless focus on food and weight can seep into your psyche, resulting in unhealthy fixations.
  • L.A. Crounse
    Published 2 months ago
    How to Cure an Eating Disorder According to Movies
  • Chiyoko B
    Published 3 months ago
    I Just Wanted to Eat Chocolate Cake and Not Worry About Gaining Weight

    I Just Wanted to Eat Chocolate Cake and Not Worry About Gaining Weight

    I wanted to be the woman who could eat cake and ice cream whenever she wanted and not worry about counting calories after. I wanted to be the woman who could obtain pleasure from eating cake and not worry I would gain weight from it.
  • Summer osborne
    Published 3 months ago
    Anorexia

    Anorexia

    This is never an easy topic to discuss. The word anorexia might sound harmless to some but it is in fact a mental illness. As someone that has suffered from anorexia, I can tell you that it has a large part to do with the mindset of that individual.
  • raaman
    Published 3 months ago
    Binge eating, Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

    Binge eating, Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

    I.We all eat too much too often. Sometimes when we visit a relative's house, when we find our favorite food on the table, sometimes when we come to a reception with delicious food, we sometimes eat too much when we feel hungry. Food is an important part of our lives and good food makes us happy. So it is only natural that we sometimes eat too much. But some people have an uncontrollable rhythm of eating too much regularly.
  • Kelly Lindsay
    Published 4 months ago
    Esmerelda, Pt.1

    Esmerelda, Pt.1

    The pain was like nothing I had ever experienced before. I was doubled over in my bed, on top of the blanket, with my knees tucked in close to my chest and my arms wrapped around them. My knuckles were white from gripping so tightly. Seconds later, I released my legs and laid flat on my back, staring longingly at the ceiling through the blurry window of my tears. I rolled onto my left side, again tucking my knees into my chest, and for a moment, I gave into the pain, letting my head lull on the pillow, feeling the tightness in my chest increasing. It was three in the morning and I knew I had to get up early for work, but nothing would make the pain stop, or even ease. I had experienced this same pain on two other occasions in the last 6 years, and I think it could be likened to heartburn, but I imagine much, much worse. It felt like there was something trapped inside of my rib cage, right at the bottom, where the left side meets the right. This ‘something’ seemingly wasn’t sure whether it wanted to be in or out, because it would tighten one minute, and then the next minute it felt like it was pushing against my rib cage, almost to breaking point. The scariest part is that it was so painful to inhale, and every breath seemed to become shorter and more strained. I had tried heartburn relief when I experienced this pain before, with no luck. During this specific episode, I was blinded by pain and must have dosed myself with a questionable number of ibuprofen tablets, but nothing helped. It was mid March in England, absolutely freezing, and yet I had droplets of sweat pouring out of my skin at an alarming rate. The last time I experienced this same pain, I was with my ex-boyfriend, who was aware of what I was going through, and so I felt safe knowing that if I needed to go to the hospital, he was there to take me. This time, I was alone. I had moved to the UK late December in a ‘quarter-life-crisis’ fashion, hoping to see some of the world while gaining some career experience. I guess I was technically not alone, as I lived in a dark and dingy share house with 6 other people who I barely knew (constantly closed bedroom doors never did lead to building those ‘lifelong friendships’ that people always rave about after going traveling). Regardless of the other inhabitants residing in the High Wycombe icebox we called ‘home’, I had never felt more alone and terrified. I was conflicted; the rational part of me knew that the pain would eventually subside, as it had done in the past, and that I had to ‘stop chucking a wobbly’ (classic dad term for throwing a tantrum) and get on with it; the two other sides of me were arguing back and forth between calling out for help from one of the sleeping strangers in the house, and just accepting that I was going to die. None of my thoughts won that battle. I am not entirely sure how I got to sleep, whether the ibuprofen eventually did its job or I passed out from the pain, but either way I have a vivid memory of seeing the numbers 5:49 light up as I tapped my phone before drifting off and thinking...fuck.
  • Ashley Beatty-Pernetti
    Published 4 months ago
    Understanding Anorexia Nervosa

    Understanding Anorexia Nervosa

    Anorexia is an eating disorder characterized by weight loss, difficulties maintaining a healthy weight, and oftentimes, a distorted body image, and it actually isn’t about food at all. In reality, this disorder is an unhealthy and possibly life-threatening way to cope with emotional issues surrounding a negative body image and poor self worth. At any given moment, 0.4% of young women and 0.1% of young men will suffer from anorexia nervosa.