disorder

The spectrum of Mental Health disorders is incredibly vast; we showcase the multitude of conditions that affect mood, thinking and behavior.

  • Diane Campbell
    Published 3 days ago
    The reality of Trichotillomania

    The reality of Trichotillomania

    Trichotillomania, also known as hair pulling disorder, is a mental disorder that is part of the obsessive compulsive disorder classification. Trichotillomania involves the overwhelming compulsion to repeatedly pull out their own hair, which can be from the head, eyebrows, lashes, pubic hair, or any hair on the person's body.
  • Mr Dux
    Published 4 days ago
    How I Killed the Voice in my Head

    How I Killed the Voice in my Head

    Hello There my dearest reader, Today’s story is one of a darker nature; the sad truth is the voice that died was one of my only nice voices I’ve ever met, within the confines of my mind. If I was strong enough to apply the same actions to those that berate me every waking moment, I would in a heartbeat. (Believe me I’ve tried)
  • Greta Frusha
    Published 4 days ago
    Dementia or ADHD

    Dementia or ADHD

    You can’t remember the word for, what is it? You bake with it, use it to scrape out the bowl. Damn, the mixing bowl is dirty, got to wash that. Do I have enough eggs? What was I looking for again? The thingie, the, oh hell who is texting now? 30 min later, the word ‘spatula’ pops in your head. You’ve noticed that regular words, everyday words, names you should know escape you. You are more forgetful about errands. You get sidetracked more easily than normal. You are also over the age of 50. Secretly you begin to worry if you are seeing early signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s. Or, are you one of many adults that are dealing with ADHD? What are your chances that you will be diagnosed with ADHD? Not very good and this is why.
  • Matthew Primous
    Published 5 days ago
    Supporting Adolescents with ASD Transition to Adulthood

    Supporting Adolescents with ASD Transition to Adulthood

    Factors Supporting Adolescents with ASD Transition to Adulthood Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is prevalent among the U.S. population. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (2013), about 1% of the U.S. children and adults experience ASD. Specifically, 1 in 68 adolescents has ASD (Anderson & Butt, 2017). Even though the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition (DSM-5) asserts that research has not found specific causes of mental illness, it has addressed some consequences including the dropout rate among adolescents (e.g., Anderson & Butt, 2017; Goldstein et al., 2018) thus resulting in low quality of life of adolescents with ASD compared to those without ASD (Goldstein et al., 2018). Moreover, even though transition services for adolescents with ASD are expanding, the outcomes remain bleak. Transition services focused on developing daily living skills related to executive functioning for goal attainment, follow-through, as well as managing self-care needs should be a priority (e.g. Alverson, Lindstrom, & Hirano, 2015). High school transition services designed to develop and support youth's internal motivation, disability awareness, family supports, and clear post-school goals are crucial for them to be college and career ready.
  • Nicole Chevrier
    Published 5 days ago
    Person-First or Identity-First Language?

    Person-First or Identity-First Language?

    Throughout my undergraduate education, I was always taught to use person-first language when referring to people with disabilities of any kind. I became used to this way of speaking throughout my degree and as I completed my minor in learning and developmental disabilities. I personally don't have any experience with a learning disability myself, so I tried to imagine what I would prefer, person-first or identity-first language, if I did have a learning disability. Every time I thought about what I would prefer, I always arrived at person-first language. I thought to myself, “I would want other people to recognize me as a person first and not define who I am just by my disability.” Fast forward to my first semester in PDP, we were assigned the article Person-First and Identity-First Language Developing Psychologists’ Cultural Competence Using Disability Language by Dunn and Andrews. Upon reading this article the first time, I still did not fully understand or agree with using identity-first language, (saying a disabled person instead of a person with disabilities) but I enjoyed that my prior beliefs and teachings were being challenged.
  • Jessie Marie
    Published 7 days ago
    Living With OCD

    Living With OCD

    I'm finally in bed after a long and busy day. My body is in the perfect position, the bed is soft and warm, and I'm slowly drifting off to sleep...
  • HeyMandrew
    Published 12 days ago
    My Journey with mental Illness PT.1

    My Journey with mental Illness PT.1

    I never thought I would be effected by the disorder I have, I used to make jokes about having OCD. I never knew what it was really like.
  • Dulcy Warfield
    Published 13 days ago
    What Makes ME Qualified to Talk About Mental Health?

    What Makes ME Qualified to Talk About Mental Health?

    A Bad Experience at a Young Age You'll be surprised what might traumatize you. I vividly remember a horrible experience from when I was about 7 years old. It wouldn't be until I turned 22, and had 2 children, before I realized I had a problem due to this event.
  • Jennifer Lind
    Published 19 days ago
    Refusing the Dreamscape Part 2

    Refusing the Dreamscape Part 2

    So these episodes go on for years, the hypnagogic hallucinations, the intense sleep paralysis and that sense that I was being coerced into a state that did not feel right-I fought that immediately every time.
  • Sherry McGuinn
    Published 21 days ago
    OCD is No Fun

    OCD is No Fun

    Melvin Udall in "As Good as It Gets." Adrian Monk in "Monk." Dr. Hannibal Lecter in the "Red Dragon" series. The list of TV and film characters rendered particularly memorable by their peculiar quirks, mannerisms, and tics, is long. In reality, the number of people suffering from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), is legion. According to BeyondOCD.org, in the U.S., about 1 in 40 adults and 1 in 100 children have OCD.
  • Jennifer Lind
    Published 22 days ago
    Refusing the Dreamscape: The Frightening World of Sleep Paralysis, Night Terrors & Cataplexy Part One

    Refusing the Dreamscape: The Frightening World of Sleep Paralysis, Night Terrors & Cataplexy Part One

    I have to start by saying that I don't know how much I am genetically predisposed to these sleep disorders. I know my older sister used to sleep walk when she was little but grew out of it. There really is no way to tell how predisposed I am since doctors started me on Ritalin at age 3 and Night Terrors followed after about 3 years.
  • Elisha 'lexii' Bennie
    Published 22 days ago
    The Pen

    The Pen

    The GP room Patient: Do you ever feel like you're not alone? Even when you are? There's no noise, just a ringing in your ear. Like static on the radio, the air around you sizzling. It wasn't as loud when I was younger, but now... It's kind of hard to explain.