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Beasts of the Wild

Beasts of the Wild

Lions and tigers and bears - oh my! Exploring majestic beasts in their natural habitats.

  • Em and Lou VanLifeDiary
    Published about a year ago
    UK Wolf Conservation Trust Closes Its Doors

    UK Wolf Conservation Trust Closes Its Doors

    The UK Wolf Conservation Trust is home to around 10 wolves living very happily in four packs on the conservation site. These include North American and Arctic wolves, as well as a European/North American cross.
  • Jenna Deedy
    Published about a year ago
    Two More Southern Resident Orcas Are Ailing—and Three Are Pregnant

    Two More Southern Resident Orcas Are Ailing—and Three Are Pregnant

    According to researchers who are focused on the Southern Resident orca population, two more whales are falling ill as a result of the lack of salmon they depend on for their survival. The first animal in question is K25, also known as Scoter. He's a 27-year-old adult male who has been documented in aerial photographs for the last decade. Researchers say that in recent weeks, Scoter has been showing signs of becoming thinner than he was in previous years. The trouble for the endangered mammal began last year when his mother, K13, also known as Skagit, died. This is because Skagit, like all orca matriarchs within the Southern Resident pods, helped her family and other pods in navigating the Salish Sea for salmon before capturing and sharing the newly caught prey. Male orcas rely on help from their mothers, sisters, female cousins, nieces, and aunts to find and track down prey and meet their much larger energy demands. Studies have shown that adult orca males tend to have higher risks of dying following their mothers' deaths. This puts Scoter at a higher risk of dying.
  • Jenna Deedy
    Published about a year ago
    Six Facts About the Sperm Whale

    Six Facts About the Sperm Whale

    The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), made famous by Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, is the largest species of toothed whale in the world. At around 60 feet in length and weighing in at around 120,000 pounds, these predatory mammals are found throughout all of the world’s deep oceans and are regarded as one of the most extreme animals on the planets, due to being able to dive down to such great depths. So, here are some six facts about the sperm whale.
  • Robby Bernstein
    Published about a year ago
    10 Animals We Wish We Could Keep as Pets (But Really Can't)

    10 Animals We Wish We Could Keep as Pets (But Really Can't)

    Many, but not all, states in the US have laws prohibiting adoption of many wild or exotic animals. The popularity of adopting wild animals among people living in these states, or other parts of the world where wild animals can be legally kept, has increased dramatically in recent years. Unfortunately, the decision to adopt these animals is often short-sighted. Adopting a wild animal is not the same as having a pet, and as a result, these animals are often mishandled or abandoned once the adopter realizes how substantial the responsibility is. There are also many instances of adopted wild animals harming humans, either directly or unknowingly through the diseases they carry. With that in mind, here is a list of some of the many animals we wish we could keep as pets.
  • Jenna Deedy
    Published about a year ago
    When the Water Turns Red: How Red Tide Affects Florida’s Marine Animals

    When the Water Turns Red: How Red Tide Affects Florida’s Marine Animals

    Karenia brevis is a type of dinoflagellate that is known to produce toxins that can accumulate in marine organisms like shellfish, which can lead to poisoning when eaten by other animals. It’s adapted to get nutrients on the West Florida Shelf Oligotrophic where it feeds on copepods and their feces. In order for it to thrive, it also needs low light and an upwelling to initiate a bloom. The bloom occurs in four stages which include initiation, growth, maintenance and termination. Yet researchers have yet to determine which stage could serve as a primary factor to a bloom maintenance since there are multiple sources that are involved in the process. What is known, though, is that once a bloom begins, a combination of winds and current push the newly formed red tide to shore. As a result, the dangers it can have on animals begins to arise when K. brevis gets ingested because after all, they do produce a neurotoxin that bioaccumulate up the food chain of Florida’s marine ecosystem. This toxin can also be airborne when the cell breaks up from wave activity.
  • Beth Titchmarsh
    Published about a year ago
    Silent No More

    Silent No More

    Loro Parque. Situated in Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, it is apparently considered "the best zoo in the world" according to the park's website and numerous posters plastered across the island. It's hard to ignore the appeal of such a place that offers the world's largest indoor penguin enclosure and Europe's largest shark tunnel, whilst also playing host to a variety of different animal shows throughout the day. So, having been in Tenerife myself recently on holiday with family it seemed only right that which should pay a visit of our own to such a thrilling place. And to be quite honest, from the family-friendly exterior it's hard to imagine that anything could be wrong with a place so driven by the conservation of endangered animals. However, as most people should have come to understand by now, all is not as it seems from the outside looking in and after doing my own research off of knowledge I vaguely had already I discovered something that needs to be uncovered.
  • Lillie Maria
    Published about a year ago
    Behind the Scenes

    Behind the Scenes

    The first elephant to be born in captivity in the western hemisphere went by the name "Packy", he was an Asian elephant who lived until the age of 44, which is premature for this breed of elephant as they normally live up to 60 years. Although Packy was the firstborn in captivity in the US, elephants being subjected to capture and taming started more than 4,000 years ago. Many people assume because an elephant has been tamed that its natural place is with humans, which isn't the case because elephants aren't domesticated animals as it takes generations after generations for an animal to become domesticated. Now there are still over 15,000 elephants in captivity for our own entertainment.
  • Sandra Pollard
    Published about a year ago
    A Puget Sound Orca in Captivity

    A Puget Sound Orca in Captivity

    I refer to the recently published article by Jenna Deedy in PetLife titled Freeing Lolita the Killer Whale is Not an Option, and take issue with a number of matters.
  • Katy Preen
    Published about a year ago
    Top Ten LGBT+ Animals

    Top Ten LGBT+ Animals

    Have you ever heard someone say that being gay isn’t “natural?” Well, I have some bad news for them: nature is gay AF. Our world has numerous examples of animals that change gender, engage in same-sex activity, and throw gender norms out completely. Here’s my top ten animals from across the LGBT+ spectrum.